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Discussion Starter #1
I have an opportunity to intern as a trainer/assist-trainer at a poss. reward facility with good ethics and track record. It's something I always wanted to do, but wasn't sure if I was ready. I'm excited about it.

My question is, if this turns out to be something I enjoy and would like to pursue, what are the better certification programs that I should look into? I plan to expand my reading and realize that experience and working with a mentor is key, but for accreditation purposes, are there any tips or suggestions you can offer?
 

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I have an opportunity to intern as a trainer/assist-trainer at a poss. reward facility with good ethics and track record. It's something I always wanted to do, but wasn't sure if I was ready. I'm excited about it.

My question is, if this turns out to be something I enjoy and would like to pursue, what are the better certification programs that I should look into? I plan to expand my reading and realize that experience and working with a mentor is key, but for accreditation purposes, are there any tips or suggestions you can offer?
Well get started with this one 1st so you can actually get into it and then the future will be something to ponder on. The new place may have much more real life info for you to continue on with. You know what they say about long journeys it's that 1st step that starts em-all.
 

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Good advice. I do tend to plan ahead...... you're right though, I should slow down and take it one step at a time.
 

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If I had the money, I'd go with Karen Pryor Academy, or maybe a masters or doctorate in animal behavior.
 

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Good advice. I do tend to plan ahead...... you're right though, I should slow down and take it one step at a time.
Well whether it's dog training, or you name the career it's better to get your feet wet 1st. Believe it or not through the years I have seen a few wannabe dog trainers that once they got into it decided it just was not for them.

Amateur training is a lot of fun with little pressure on person doing the work. Professional training is a different ball game. Training a dog in a planned/contracted amount of time certainly adds pressure to the program. Just throwing a little devil's advocate at you. Not trying to dissuade you, I think you have a good start up plan now, many adjustments can be added to plan.

Now Obedience classes/schools is something else, I never had the people personality needed (my weakness) I always preferred to train the dog and then the owner as it was easier to train one dummy at a time.

Not knocking schools etc, as I said it was my lack of people ability.
 

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Well whether it's dog training, or you name the career it's better to get your feet wet 1st. Believe it or not through the years I have seen a few wannabe dog trainers that once they got into it decided it just was not for them.

Amateur training is a lot of fun with little pressure on person doing the work. Professional training is a different ball game. Training a dog in a planned/contracted amount of time certainly adds pressure to the program. Just throwing a little devil's advocate at you. Not trying to dissuade you, I think you have a good start up plan now, many adjustments can be added to plan.

Now Obedience classes/schools is something else, I never had the people personality needed (my weakness) I always preferred to train the dog and then the owner as it was easier to train one dummy at a time.

Not knocking schools etc, as I said it was my lack of people ability.
You touched on all of my chief concerns. When asked why I haven't pursued training, I typically say that training dogs is fun, but teaching people to train and communicate with their dogs is much more challenging. Add to that, a set of goals a professional is paid to achieve, and you have added pressure. Definitely something to consider.

The best trainers I've encountered say little, and convey a great deal. Others who have inspired me are creative and tend to think outside the box. These are tall orders to live up to in my mind, as I don't think I fall in either category, so I do think it's important to take it one step at a time. I would like to think that education and experience can go a long way in developing those skills. But I also think it's high time I got off my arse and see if this lives up to what I hoped it would be.

My true, long-term dream, is to open a facility that provides an environment where dogs have an opportunity to participate in activities and training geared towards what they naturally enjoy. Not quite sure how to describe it, except, you know when you've found that one thing that really, really makes your dog light up. I love watching that and I love when an owner sees that joy.
 

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I saw my 1st bird-dog competition field trial and lost it. The Pro trainers, the horses, the staked out dogs etc, etc, etc. I said in 10 yrs I was gonna be one of those trainers. 3 yrs later I placed 3rd in the largest GSP national championship trial run back in Jurassic era. It was huge amounts of work, but then again it was not work it was a most enjoyable labor of love.

I never had a doubt in my mind that I could not do it. It was a done deal.
 

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...On the other hand, I don't think I have the 'patience' to train hunting or working dogs... but my training experience was always volunteer work. There are lots of people who would be overjoyed if their puppy would pee and potty outside, wouldn't nip, would walk on a leash ("you mean you can teach him not to pull!!!"), would Sit, Down, and Come (some of the time). Canine Good Citizen (CGC) training is advanced for the average family pet, and people are amazed when you show them the potential.

I don't know if you can make much money, but I like working with people to show them how to communicate with their dog.
 

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...On the other hand, I don't think I have the 'patience' to train hunting or working dogs... but my training experience was always volunteer work. There are lots of people who would be overjoyed if their puppy would pee and potty outside, wouldn't nip, would walk on a leash ("you mean you can teach him not to pull!!!"), would Sit, Down, and Come (some of the time). Canine Good Citizen (CGC) training is advanced for the average family pet, and people are amazed when you show them the potential.

I don't know if you can make much money, but I like working with people to show them how to communicate with their dog.
Thanks for the input. I do love it when people see the potential in their dogs. Changes their perspective.

I have a lot of respect for trainers when I see someone in a class struggling with a concept. I figure I'll have to stay present to the thought that some trainers may have been frustrated with me at times too.
 

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Ive been training for about 10 years now (grooming for 4years), positive reinforcement and I love it. I recommend getting your CPDT (certified Pet Dog Trainer). I like Karen Pryor but I think its pretty expensive and no more of a prestigious title than APDT or CPDT. Victoria Stilwell also has a program like Karen Pryors. :) Good luck on your journey!
 
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