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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Those of you that trained your dogs to do this, what steps did you take? I have been having Faolan sit for his food, but I am now wanting to add "wait". I have him on leash and hold the leash and have him sit, but when I set the food down he automatically lunges to go eat it and is totally oblivious to me saying "wait". It gets to the point to where he is screaming trying to get at his food. Any way I could go about doing this differently that may get me better results?
 

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I put my arm between the dog and the food, and they can't go until I remove my arm. And of course they must be sitting before I even put the bowl on the ground.
 

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What I did was command my dogs to sit, then put down their food bowls. If they lunged forward for it, I grabbed the bowl and lifted it back up in the air until they sat again. Then I put it down again and if they lunged, I picked it up again. Quite a pain in the butt, honestly, but after a week they picked up on the fact that if they lunged forward to eat, they didn't get to, whereas if they sat and waited until I said "ok", they got dinner :)
 

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Have you read the NILF stickie? Its a great philosophy and would be beneficial for you.

When asking your dog to wait you are basically implementing the concept of Nothing In Life Is Free (NILF).

This is actually very simple and easy. Set aside at least a half hour to feed your dog. If you have more than one dog, its possible to teach them together but much easier if you separate the dogs and work with one at a time. Fix your dogs food and get his attention. Have him sit about 5 feet away from where the bowl is usually set down. Do not do anything if he won't sit. Wait until he sits then put take one step towards where the bowl will be set down. If he gets up, return to him. and have him sit. Repeat. Eventually, he will understand that in order for you to put the bowl down, he has to sit and wait. Do not give in if he moves. Not once or you will make this a lot more difficult than it needs to be. I wouldn't use a leash and it really isn't important where the dog is waiting or if he is in a down or sit. Whats important is that he waits until you say 'okay' and he doesn't invade your space.

The whole 'trick' to this is not getting frustrated. You will have planned so there will be no where you need to be. It is kind of like a test of wills. It might take a while, a long while, but really once he gets it, the next time you go to do it you will be amazed at how fast he understands.

I did this from day one with my Boys. Now, at 3 years, I can put a full bowl of meat and kibble down and they won't touch it until I say 'okay'. I think this training works in other aspects of life for them as well because they won't touch human food that is out, even if its easily accessible. They also never touch the trash or anything really they aren't suppose to. It allows them to have more freedom because I trust them to have the run of the house and yard. But... we have been doing this (and leave it) for over 3 years now... (disclaimer: please dont leave your puppy out and expect it to leave your stuff alone)
 

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I think everyone nailed it with making the dogs sit until the release word is said. You're basically teaching the dog a "wait" command and could use this opportunity to do so if you wanted. And it will learn that "okay!" is a release word. You can apply this training to other things as well.
 

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I do a variation on the NILF method. The only difference is I don't tell the pup what I want from him. No talking! Just hold the bowl until he sits, then slowly put it down. If he charges the food dish, I take it away until he sits. Do that for 15 minutes or until he figures it out for himself, whichever comes first. If he hasn't gotten the message, try again after a little while. Give the process about an hour and put his food up 'til the next feeding if he isn't using his brain housing group. Even extremely pushy pups will get it long before they are in danger of starvation.
 

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This has to be one of the easiest things to teach a dog. I didn't even ask mine to sit, I just stood still, waited them out, and then they sat, because 'sit' usually gets them what they want. Once they sat, I started lowering the food bowl. If the dog made any move to get up at all, I simply straightened back up. I didn't say anything, they just couldn't have the food. Wait for the dog to sit again, and repeat, until you can put the food on the floor and leave it there for 1-2 seconds, then release the dog to eat. Gradually you can increase the time they have to wait for it.
 

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What I did was command my dogs to sit, then put down their food bowls. If they lunged forward for it, I grabbed the bowl and lifted it back up in the air until they sat again. Then I put it down again and if they lunged, I picked it up again. Quite a pain in the butt, honestly, but after a week they picked up on the fact that if they lunged forward to eat, they didn't get to, whereas if they sat and waited until I said "ok", they got dinner :)
This is almost exactly what we did with Caeda. I can say it worked fantastic. By the time she was 3 months old (we got her at 2 months) she would sit as soon as she saw the bowl (by then we didn't have to say sit). She wouldn't go for it until we said ok. We have also practiced this with treats while she sits....just throw a couple on the floor and she can't go for it until you say a release word. It actually did wonders for her self control overall.
lil_fuzzy mentioned not even saying sit...I personally found telling her sit just sped things along, helping her figure out quicker part of what we wanted, but either way can work. Once she would wait we actually added saying "stay" to give a name to what she was doing. She also caught on to stay fairly quickly in other situations too, and I think this method helped with that. We've started feeding her out of a Kong Genius and she won't go for that either until we say ok.
Good luck!
 

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I teach dogs this similar to dmickle1's method, if the dog doesn't know a stay command.

Otherwise, I just tell them to stay and put it down. But if you don't want to wait for that...

Ask the dog to sit about 3-4 feet in front of you. Say WAIT very sternly and calmly, hold a hand up at them. SLOWLY start to put the bowl down, if their butt pops up, ask for a sit again and tell them to wait. Slowly put the food bowl back down and once you can get it to the ground and let your hand leave it, make sure you're releasing the dog, not the dog jumping up for it just because it's on the floor. If he goes for it snatch it up again and repeat. I've never had to work with a dog more than twice with this method.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
The thing I am finding most hard is the fact that he barks and barks and barks and barks, louder and louder the longer we wait for him to do what we want. We are in an apartment and we are worried that they will complain about the noise and we'll get in trouble :( If he would just be quiet it would be so much easier. I don't mind if it takes 15 minutes before he actually waits, but the barking really sets my nerves on edge.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I did that and he just followed me whining and barking :( I just tried to start teaching him loose leash walking and he did the same thing. When I stopped walking because he was pulling, he just kept pulling and pulling, barking increasingly louder and more frantic and I stood there for 20 minutes waiting for him to stop and be quiet. And he did occasionally and as soon as I went to reward him he started again. Didn't even get to finish saying the word "good".
 

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Why not tell him no? or quiet.. whatever command you use.

I am not a fan of free shaping or waiting for a behavior to be offered. And that is one of the reasons, I don't have the time nor the paitence (or the sanity) to wait for 20 minutes for my dog to quit barking. That and barking in and of itself is a reinforcing behavior for my dogs and it sounds like in your case (with walking) the dog may even enjoy pulling and barking.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
He doesn't obey when I tell him quiet if its because he wants something =/
 

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Discussion Starter #16 (Edited)
Ha! Breakthrough! Started teaching him the "It's Yer Choice" way and he caught on very quickly. Was able to put his lunch down and he just laid there. May have worked too well cause I told him "Go get it!" and he gave me a look and didn't move XD Had to set it right in front of him and point at it before he understood he was allowed to eat it.
 

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Ha! Breakthrough! Started teaching him the "It's Yer Choice" way and he caught on very quickly. Was able to put his lunch down and he just laid there. May have worked too well cause I told him "Go get it!" and he gave me a look and didn't move XD Had to set it right in front of him and point at it before he understood he was allowed to eat it.
Told ya it was the fastest and easiest way. :wink:
It's a skill worth developing as well, it's better than leave it because there's no cue, and it's an excellent way to build impulse control.
ETA, make sure you use one release cue so you dont confuse him.
 

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Those of you that trained your dogs to do this, what steps did you take? I have been having Faolan sit for his food, but I am now wanting to add "wait". I have him on leash and hold the leash and have him sit, but when I set the food down he automatically lunges to go eat it and is totally oblivious to me saying "wait". It gets to the point to where he is screaming trying to get at his food. Any way I could go about doing this differently that may get me better results?

If the dog breaks, pick the food up.

If he keeps breaking, pick it up and it "disappears" for a while. If he's sitting/lying down, put the food down.

If he breaks, pick it up. He'll figure out that the food stays when he's sitting. He'll probably start to sit and wonder...wtf? How do I get that? He may look at you like "you got any ideas?"

When you get that pause, mark and cue him to eat.

That's how I did it for Wally. I didn't have to block him or anything that might amount to social pressure (granted, he's soft/sensitive, you may not need that consideration). I didn't want him to not want to eat, after all. I let his behavior create a consequence, and let him put things together.

I am not a fan of free shaping or waiting for a behavior to be offered. And that is one of the reasons, I don't have the time nor the paitence (or the sanity) to wait for 20 minutes for my dog to quit barking. That and barking in and of itself is a reinforcing behavior for my dogs and it sounds like in your case (with walking) the dog may even enjoy pulling and barking.
Hmm...

If the dog is barking for food, is barking really rewarding him? He's not getting what he wants (food). The barking is just either an expression of what he wants (and the built up energy in trying to get it) or a way to try to get you to give him food.

It's like if a dog barks to go out - what he WANTS to do is pee. Barking is just him trying to get you to get up and take him out (or at least open the door). Is barking rewarding to him?

Granted, I admit to be a big believer in shaping and have used it as the predominate method for reaching Wally when other things like telling him "no" create anxiety, not learning.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
I was able to get him to sit and wait for the release word for dinner tonight! :D :D :D He only tried to get up once before the bowl touched the floor, and all I had to do was say "ah-ah!" (not in a scolding tone) and he sat right back down and I set the bowl on the floor, waited just one second (don't want to push it) and then said "go get it!" and he hopped up and ate his food :D So proud of my little boy! And only after about half an hour of "It's Yer Choice" training was all it took to get to this point! I want to go snuggle him but he'd just try to chew my face, hahahah.
 

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With NILIF, they talk about "extinction bursts". I think that's what your dog is doing by barking his fool head off when he doesn't get his way, but I'm no trainer.

All of my dogs have to perform some task before they're fed. My Rottweiler, who is being trained for OB, either has to sit, stand or lay in front of his food bowl until I'm done feeding the other dogs and cats. My little terrier mix has to do the same, and our foster GSD just has to wait until I release him. The GSD is hard of hearing, so he's being trained with hand signals and is getting pretty good at knowing what I want.
 
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