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Discussion Starter #1
hi everyone. i'm a first time poster and i was wondering if i could get some help from you guys. i have a 6 year old olde english bulldogge who has always been an outside dog(aside from when its really hot or really cold out and i kennel him). i've been thinking i would like to start bringing him inside more and not have him destroy the house.

i admit, i didn't teach him much so his behavior is entirely my fault. however, he is good at sitting when told so i feel there's some willingness to learn on his part. i was, in fact, trying to teach him to lay down last night and he just wasn't getting it, haha. but it was the first lesson of many.

i suppose i will just get into it. when he gets on a leash, he is constantly pulling to the point of where he chokes himself. i bought a harness but could not figure out how to put it on him. have a buddy coming tonight to help me figure it out. do those reduce his wanting to pull? or how do i stop that?

he likes to jump on people other than myself(he does not attack them, but he can cause minor harm due to his size)

he's obviously not potty trained, is there a different approach i should try as oppose to typical puppy training? i've heard mixed reviews on that

now, he's not neutered and he likes to mark his spot on just about everything new. if i neuter him this late in the game, are some of these habits going to go away or are they so far engrained that its a lost cause?

i'm sure i will have more questions soon but this is a start. i appreciate all the help you guys offer and will continue looking around the rest of this site!
 

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Potty train him just like you would a puppy.
He needs to be in a crate when not being supervised.
You can put a belly band on him to prevent marking for now.
Use an enzyme cleaner like Nature's Miracle if he does have an accident.

AND reward going outside like crazy.

To tackle jumping you can:
spin away from him he looses his footing and puts four on the floor
or
step into his space and he will most likely back up
or
teach him "up" and "off"

The main thing you need to do is reward him when he is firmly planted on the ground. He will learn that's what gets attention. You can also use this to reinforce sit and decrease jumping.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
thanks for the response tofu!

i will definitely look into the belly bands. seems like a band-aid though but better than making a mess!

i'm kind of hoping since he has a bigger bladder than his puppy days that he will be easier to potty train. guess i will be finding out soon, haha.

worked with him on "down" again last night and he's slowly getting it. i get him to sit and a few times he laid down on his own, but every time i tapped his paw and said down he would actually lay down. i consider it solid progress!
 

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The belly band is just a management tool(like harnesses and head collars that prevent pulling) to prevent him from marking while you potty train.

Neutering may or may not rid him of his desire to mark. I wouldn't get him neutered thinking that it will solve the problem.
 

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The training techniques are consistent between puppies and adult dogs. Just keep in mind that in general teaching skills to adult dogs can take longer because you often have to deal with established behavior patterns and conditioning. This would defintely apply to walking on a lead. Sometimes, you will have to accept less-than-ideal outcomes for training, especially when dealing with phobias and fear reactions.

The one major exception is house-training. Adult dogs can usually be house-trained very quickly. A puppy literally takes months to house-train reliably. Most adults, even ones that have been kept outside, can be house-trained in 2-3 weeks or less if you apply the same errorless techniques that you do with puppies.

Of course, I assume you've had your dog to a vet for an examination to rule out any significanr medical issues.
 

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Best tips I ever got for house training:
- make sure you take them outside often, on a schedule, say the same "potty" words, and reward if they do it.
- when they're out and about in the house with you, keep your eyes on them, like seriously on them. It is so easy for a dog to sneak away and pee somewhere where you might not find it til later, or just sneak a pee even in the same room as you, if you're not closely watching. So, until he learns pee and poop only happen outside, keep your eyes on him.

If you do these things, you're not really even giving him a chance to have an accident, so he should learn pretty quickly. If he does have an accident, don't yell or scold, just clean with an enzymatic cleaner, and watch him more closely.

A harness won't stop him from pulling, it will just stop him from choking himself. There are stickies at the top of each forum page. There are several on walking. Two things need to occur, in my opinion. 1)Don't accept pulling on walks. This usually means your walks will be short, as both you and the dog will get frustrated at the lack of progress and distance you'll make on walks if you have to stop every time he pulls. 2)He still needs exercise, especially if you are training him not to pull on your walks. This means he's not getting much actual exercise out of his walks. So, maybe you can find a fenced in, large area, like a school play field that's not being used, and play fetch and ball, and let him have a good, long run to compensate for not getting much exercise from his walks....

A couple things for your walks: when he pulls, you just stop and "be a tree". You don't move til he loosens the tension on the leash. Do this every time, so he knows he isn't going anywhere by pulling. Also, you can turn around and walk with him, 5 or so steps in the opposite direction. Then, when he's not pulling, turn back around in your original direction and keep walking. Basically, says the same thing to your dog: if you're going to pull to go that way, we're not going to go that way. You can also do back aways, which is walking backwards, this causes him to come back to your side, and then he's not pulling.

Jumping, you've got good advice. Something you can do with strangers or guests in your home: have the dog sit, at a distance away from the guest. Let the guest approach. If the dog gets up to jump, back away and try again. For this, you need him on a leash. And, it also helps to have "volunteers" who know they're coming over to help you train your dog, that way you don't get frustrated or embarrassed at not having your dog behave with people who are there for a real visit...
 

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Discussion Starter #7
yes poly, he is up to date on his vet exams.

thanks to all of you for your responses! i'm really learning a lot from this site and am glad i found it!

that was really refreshing to read about the potty training. i will keep an eagle eye on him when i have him out of his kennel and hopefully he can pick it up rather quickly. i will definitely pick up some of the cleaner you all have been referring to.

walking him sounds like it will be a very frustrating time. i have a buddy willing to come over and be my test dummy for his jumping, haha. guess i will just see how things go and keep working with him as often as possible!
 

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got him to lay down by saying "down" and using the hand signal where i have my fingers in front of his face and move them to the ground! i waited about an hour and came back out to see if he would still do it and he did! i'm really proud of him!

i'm thinking its time to work on keeping his attention on me when there's distractions around. anyone have any good advice for that?

its really fun watching him learn and understand things! in fact, i'd say last night he was more interested in being pet and rubbed down than the treat, haha.
 

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You could teach him a "look" command or a "watch me" command. We use "look", and we use it when we're on walks when we need their attention, or when we're introducing something new into our training, or when we are feeding (we have them sit and look before we set their food down, to help with impulse control), and, just randomly.

Say "look!" in an excited voice, when they do, you treat! Repeat over and over. Gradually, you can increase the time the dog looks at you before they get the treat. But, be aware that lots of dogs don't enjoy direct, extended eye contact. It makes them uncomfortable, so you might not ask him to look for too long! :)
 
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