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Discussion Starter #1
hello
ive just taken ownership of a choc lab puppy, 14 weeks old and loves to chew toys.

i'm a rubber technologist by trade and i'm concerned that the rubber toys on the market may contain highly toxic nitrosamines. i've tried to get information on line and from manufacturers without success.

i have found information about heavy metals, but nothing at all about cancer causing nitrosamines. in human contact rubber goods, i.e medical devices, condoms, baby teats, toy balloons the nitrosamine levels are controlled to very low levels or banned completely. for analogous reading see the recent publicity on the canon camera recall, where type IV allergies were caused by the use of toxic materials in the camera rubber grip.

there are alternatives for the rubber toy manufacturers to use, i know, the company i work for makes them!

any advice? i'm not buying a rubber toy until i get some some evidence to say that the product is nitrosamine free!

thanks
kelvyn
 

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Hi,
I do not buy any rubber toys for my dogs. I supervise any play with the stuffed ones as my one dog tends to rip them open and upstuff them. She will also chew off legs, embroidered eyes etc. So toys are not left laying around the house. I would be interested in what your findings are in the future.
 

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Hello and welcome! :)

I also would be interested in your findings ... as the Kong toys are listed as 100% all natural rubber. What does that consist of? I use these as my dogs are also big stuffie manglers.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
my gut feeling is that most natural rubber toys will be made using ingredients(accelerators) called dithiocarbamates, thiazoles, sulphenamides. in some cases a cocktail of accelerators is used. these are not nice materials.

the problem is when the accelerator, particularly the dithiocarbamates are doing their job in the natural rubber i.e forming a product with correct physical properties they break down to nitrosamines. some nitrosamines are really quite nasty. for example in the shoe industry, the largest brand in sportwear has moved its products away from toxic accelerators to safer alternatives.

kelvyn
 

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You could use fabric toys. they do make some super durable fabric toys if you're willing to pay for them. They make wooden treat dispensing puzzles, too. For chewing, there's always antlers and good old fashioned bones (not cooked, of course.)
 

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I mainly go with rope toys. Rubber toys don't interest my dogs and fabric toys aren't worth the money as they are shredded in 2 minutes. 'Mammoth' brand has been the best and sturdiest ime, the 'flossy chews' ropes.
 

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(I hope it's okay to bump this up.)

A few years ago I started looking into the toxicity of dog toys. Honestly, it was really difficult to find much information at all. I contacted a handful of companies and mostly received form responses that didn't address my questions or nothing at all. The mostly helpful source I came across was an article in Whole Dog Journal. It mostly discussed lead and other metals, phthalates and parabens. There were a couple of recommended brands (Planet Dog and Kong) mentioned and those companies were very responsive and seemed knowledgeable when I contacted them. I've mostly just stuck with them ever since.

It's been a while though, and I it never hurts to reevaluate. With the recent outcry about the same toxins in people products maybe there's more information available. I have to admit that my knowledge of chemistry is weak, but I try! It's easy enough to look at the labels on chew toys and only pick the one's that say 100% natural rubber, but that can't be the whole story. How can they be different colors without added dye? If different textures are achieved in the manufacturing process, do the agents used leave significant residue that doesn't legally have to be listed? As for plush toys, how do I find out about the fabric dyes and printing ink? Does "made in the USA" realistically mean it's a safer product, or that the materials were sourced in the USA?

I don't pretend that I can avoid everything. My dogs have plenty of toys, some of which I'm sure are better than others. Still, I'd love to hear others' opinions. What do you buy? What companies are you comfortable with? Can anyone point me towards recent information on any of this?
 

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(I hope it's okay to bump this up.)
Perfectly okay when you have something to add and the thread isn't 5 years old.

People sometimes dredge up threads that are older than I am - before most dogs (and the Internet) were invented - and we kinda frown on that.
 
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