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I recently rescued a female, 8 year old, black pug from a puppy mill that was being shut down by the humane society for cruelty and poor living conditions. She's terrified of me until I get her in my arms and show her its safe. She shivers at the sight of anyone else that comes around her. She's been tortured and forced to live in a small cage purely for breeding purposes basically since she was old enough to breed. She even came along with pointless AKC registration papers.

"Scarlet" isn't doing well. I'm pretty sure she has hip dysplasia and maybe some other hind quarter type problems. I also have a very friendly Shiba Inu female which I also rescued from a puppy mill a year ago and I also just took in a boxer puppy. As overwhelming as that all might sound, its not hard at all to properly care for all of them. Until now.

She moves from the place she's laying maybe 5 times a day and 3 of those are when I have to follow her slowly through the house until she finally gets in a submissive position and allows me to pick her up to take her outside to walk. Walking is becoming harder and harder for her at a rapid pace. I have a vet appointment for her soon. But, until then I could use all the good advice I can get on ways to handle a dog thats been so badly abused for so long. She doesn't have a mean bone in her body. It deeply angers me everytime I see her suffer. I just want to give her as much happiness and love as she can handle for the remainder of her life which from what I understand is up to 4 to 6 more years. But, to look at Scarlet, you'd think she had maybe a week to live. I certainly hope this isn't the case. How can I help her warm up to me and what can I do to carefully make her more active aside from pain meds and such that I'm sure the vet will give me?

I hope that the people who made her this way end up in a cage the same way and for the same length of time as she was if not more. She's only one out of dozens of dogs that were rescued from this hell hole. These dogs deserve justice just as much as a human does. Knowing the way the judicial system works around here though, chances are they'll walk out of the courtroom with fines and some candy ass probation... It just makes me so damn angry and sad to see something so sweet and innocent have to suffer so that people could make money off of her :( I think I'm done ranting for now.
 

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PATIENCE, lots and lots of it. Find a treat she really likes, sit quietly on the floor, turned at a 45* angle to her, looking out of the corner of your eye and toss treats to her so she associates you with good things. Try to avoid standing directly over her, reaching over her head and full front angles for now. Read this and apply it to anything else she seems scared of Desensitizing A Dog To Inanimate Objects Or Noises . I'll type up more tomorrow, I've GOT to get to bed but this should give you a good start.
 

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Carla took the words out of my mouth. Great advice...
 

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Ok Mikol, first thing, let me thank you from the bottom of my heart for taking on such a challenge.

For her joints, aside from the pain meds you should get from your vet, you could start her on a good glucosamine/chondroitin/msm supplement. there are several that are built into treats. Also, is she's a bit overweight trim her down if possible (it may be difficult with her hips though), be sure she has steps to get to high places so she doesn't have to jump around. A good food will help her coat and prevent any ear problems, perhaps something without grains such as DVP Natural Balance fish and sweet potato or Duck and potato or one of the high protien foods with no grains (Call of the Wild or Evo)

What kind of condition are her teeth in ? Her ears? Her nose roll?

As far as her behavior what other problems are you seeing aside from fear? I know you've said there's been no aggression ans that's GREAT.

I highly recommend you get these books to help you and perhaps work with a good positive reinforcement trainer. I'll give you some site to help you find a trainer as well.

FEARFULNESS PAMPHLET Ian Dunbar

HELP FOR YOUR FEARFUL DOG - A STEP-BY-STEP GUIDE TO HELPING YOUR DOG CONQUER HIS FEARS
Nicole Wilde

Trainer resources

www.iaabc.org
www.apdt.com
 
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