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Hi everyone,

I have a three year old mix that I found on the street a year ago. He has always had gastric issues due to eating bad or toxic things during his street years, but never very serious issues and he is always rushed straight to the vet when anything is out of the normal. At 4:30 AM today he had a full grand mawl seizure. He was fine all day, nothing different and then a seizure. I immediately rushed him to the ER vet and again today to have bloodwork & urine testing done. So far the urine testing showed normal and we should get the bloodwork back tonight.

Has anyone ever had a dog with tonic clonic seizures that was not epilepsy? At this point, it seems like epilepsy is the best option. The rest looks pretty grim. Would love to hear about any pet that has experienced something similar.

Thank you so much.
 

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My heart dog had fairly mild seizures that only lasted a few minutes between 2 and 4 years of age then no more. I remember 6 in that time frame. His were due to stress plus something else. One time he had a snarl fest [stress] with the other dog about a joint supplement [chemical] and he won that extra supplement. Another time I took him for a walk without the other dog after a bath [stress big time] and he stepped on NPK fertilizer [chemical] which isn't toxic. Maybe your dog will be lucky like mine. Since his seizures were so infrequent no medication was ever prescribed.
 

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Remmy, my Shih Tzu x Maltese, had his first seizure at about four years of age. He had them off and on again for about four years, never enough to go on medication and never actually found the cause. They stopped for the next four or five years, then he has had the occasional one. They are the type of seizure where he goes stiff, then thrashes around, comes out of it in a few moments and is back to normal. They never stopped him from competing in Agility and having a normal life.
 

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My last pooch, a German Shepherd mix, had epilepsy. I don't recall the age he was diagnosed, but he was young. My best guess would be 2 or 3 years of age. He had other medical issues as well. He had an allergic reaction to his puppy vaccinations. The first set of shots we did not notice anything. The second set, however, his face and head became severely swollen and we had to make an after hours visit to an animal hospital in a neighboring city. From then on, he was given an antihistamine injection immediately before any of his vaccinations. Whether this has anything to do with his epilepsy, I don't know.

He had his first seizure on a day when I made chocolate chip cookies. I panicked, because I thought I'd dropped a piece of chocolate and poisoned him. Our vet could not say for sure what caused the seizure and we were sent home with instructions to keep him away from chocolate and for us to keep an eye on him. Months went by and we thought his seizures were a thing of the past. Just as we got comfortable with his health, he had a seizure followed by a more severe, long-lasting seizure minutes later.

My dog did not fall over or lay down to have his seizure. Instead, he planted his feet wide apart and stiffly swayed. The doctor said my dog was not conscious during these seizures, but it sure looked like my dog was working very hard to stay on his feet and keep his eyes focused on me. His seizures looked a bit like the seizure this tiny dog is having: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W1IVfzi4Lmo

Our vet prescribed phenobarbitol (a controlled substance). I gave our dog medication every morning and every evening for the rest of his life. Over the next 9 or so years, he had a couple of mild (short duration) seizures but the medication mostly kept them under control. In addition to regular medication, which cost about $65 every two months, our dog had to visit the vet twice a year for blood work to ensure he had the right amount of meds in his system and to monitor for any organ damage.

I wrapped his tablets in a 1/4 slice of sandwich cheese, which he looked forward to with great anticipation. If I was a little late with his nighttime meds, he would stare at me until he got my attention, then run to the kitchen and look up at the fridge to let me know it was medicine time. :) Aside from the occasional seizure, my beautiful mutt-dog was a happy, healthy, intelligent, rambunctious dog.
 
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