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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm having a dilemma. I've been looking for a dog for a long time. I wanted one particular breed but every time I got involved with a breeder, something happened and I didn't get a dog.
I have also been looking at another breed, which, on paper, satisfies all of my criteria. However, I'm hung up on the other breed because it is, in my opinion, a better looking dog and I have developed an irrational fixation with wanting to have a dog that is relatively rare. I knew about this breed before a lot of other people who have already gotten one.

I don't know when I'd be able to get one of these dogs. It could be at the end of the year, or, possibly, not until the middle of next year. I have been wanting and trying to get a dog for a LONG time (years). I have the opportunity to get the other type of dog (less attractive breed) from a very good and experienced breeder. However, if I do, and the opportunity presents itself for me to get one of the other dogs, I'll be kicking myself for not waiting. On the other hand, if I end up waiting until the middle of next year, I'll probably be kicking myself for not getting the dog that was available.

Sometimes I think I'm too hung up on the idea of having a dog that other people will complement me o and make a fuss over. I picture myself in the vet's office with the one dog and somebody with the other type, with everybody gushing about how cute it is and myself sitting there thinking, I should have had that kind of dog first. They are very good looking dogs. Crazy, I know but being relatively rare, I guess I don't want to wait until everybody already has one and the novelty is worn off. I should mention that I did research this breed THOROUGHLY.
Never having owned either type of dog, I have no idea, if, in reality, I'd be any more or less happy with one or the other.

I don't know what to do.
 

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There is nothing wrong with finding a dog's look pleasing to the eye. Most people have preferred coat colors or body structure types.

But a dog is far more than a novelty of its looks, far more than what other people think (or don't think as really most people are just like "aww, cute pup" for every dog they see), and if for some reason you care about what other people think then a well trained and well mannered dog will get far more compliments then a physically unique dog on the whole.

10-15 years of your life and the whole of the dog's life. Personality, temperament, that feeling of just fitting into each others space the right way. Imagine the dog curled up on the couch with you, imagine walking alone with him through the woods, imagine caring for him if he is sick or injured, imagine day to day life and pick what fits that.

If you want to turn heads on the street, get a motorcycle or flashy car.
 

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I understand the irrational feelings of wanting a dog for how they look etc. It really just depends if it goes deeper than that. Owning that breed will definitely be different than your fantasy. I wouldn't even kind of worry about them not being rare anymore and everyone else having them. I've had those kinds of over the top thoughts though (as in like.. everyone will think my dog is soo pretty and I'll be the crap with how well I've trained it.. still not completely reality haha..)

I've wanted an Aussie since I was 10 years old. No other breed captured my heart like this breed. Aesthetically or in character. As soon as I was moved out and on my own, the first breed I went looking for was an Aussie. Looking back now.. had it been any other breed it just would not have been the same. I've always liked Border Collies.. but had my BC been my first dog I would have still been yearning for the Aussie. My Aussie is still my everything and my poor BC takes a little bit of a backseat sometimes (it's okay, she has my husband who clearly favors her.)

I always go with my gut now.. which for me is waiting. You can only do what you feel is best for you.
 

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I just want to know which two breeds you are talking about? PM me or something lol.

The little merle on the left turns heads now and I know she is going to look regal as all heck as an adult... My wife loves to take pictures of her and people always ask "Oh is that an Aussie!?" and then comment on her eyes, but what makes me happy is when she behaves and does what I ask. Having a pretty dog speaks to your taste, having a well behaved dog speaks to your dedication. She's also my first purebred and I feel a little guilty over it sometimes (I feel like some people assume I got the dog for vanity), I put myself at ease by pushing her to be the best she can be/showing off the reasons I went out of my way to get and raise (a crazy high energy) herding pup.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I have always wanted an Aussie. I’d have one already, if not for allergy issues in the family and this dilemma would not exist.
 

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I completely understand.

I've loved newfs my whole life. I was that kid who had to pet every single one she saw when I was 8 (that, honestly, hasn't changed LOL). It's look and personality for me, it doesn't help that every owner tells me what wonderful family dogs they are, and the breed always shows up in the top matches when I do those 'breed selector' quizzes.

But my first dog wasn't a newf (I didn't know much about breeders and good breeders and puppy mills at the time). My second dog was a rescue because I couldn't spend too much money on a dog. Then later year (13 years later) I looked at newfs too... but I was impatient, and honestly, none of the breeders I contacted had anything planned for a while (most didn't even reply to me), a couple of them tried to turn me off the breed (but they're expensive to take care of, they don't like hiking etc). So I went the rescue route again and got a puppy there. Love her to death even if she absolutely NOT what I was looking for (she's very leash-reactive so it's very hard to walk her, and she scares all our guests by barking like crazy at them... when a nice, social dog is really what I wanted, lol). But anyway, 1.5 year later, I'm ready to get another dog, and I'm back looking at newfs... the first breeding I was on the list for didn't work, I almost got a 8 month old pup but he got snatched before I got to him, and now I'm on a list again for a breeding that should happen shortly, and really hoping this one will work out AND they will have at least 3 males (I'm 3rd for a male). I actually put a deposit this time. But with everything that's gone wrong so far, I'm still not sure it's actually going to work out (but I suppose that as long as I'm patient, I'll get one.. eventually).

The dilemma for us really is that EVERYONE is trying to convince me not to get one... they're big, they drool, they shed a lot, they love water (it's a bit hard to find places to make dogs swim in central NJ, and most beaches are not dog-friendly)... and as much as I love puppies, they're exhausting, and my 18 month old can finally be let in the house alone and let me sleep in until 8am, so that's why I was hoping for that 8 month old to work out... So I was considering an adult rescue, too... which seemed like a much easier/faster option (rescues are a pain, but most adults don't have so many people interested in them)... but then I had to consider how to introduce and adult dog to my dogs (especially my leash reactive 18 month old) and puppies are just easier to introduce to adult dogs...

My point though is that you'll ALWAYS come back to your first choice. Always. But, unless you're 60+ or something, chances are that you'll get other opportunities to get a dog too (I mean, this is going to be our 3rd dog, but our first dog is 14 and it's pretty obvious that he's not going to be around forever). I mean, I don't regret one instant getting my last dog... I wouldn't trade her for anything! But I still want a newf. So really, you could get the second breed you're looking at, and get the next opportunity to get the other one too (in 3 years or whatever). Obviously, that's if it's even possible for you to get two dogs. But why not? I mean, it's easier to wait when you already have a dog, honestly (I'm going to enjoy those few months with just my two).

That being said, I wouldn't worry too much about what OTHERS will say. I do agree with the others that people are more likely to compliment you on a well behaved dog than one that barks at them (like mine... even though she's very original looking and GORGEOUS). And to be honest, as long as a dog is cute, personally, I don't care how common they are, I WILL fuss all over them.

But keep looking. I'm sure you are, but the breeder I just put a deposit on, I didn't even know of 2 years ago. So it's worth looking around more, expanding your search area in case they are willing to ship as well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
The big issues is that if I am offered a puppy by rhis one prestigious breeder, and that’s a BIG if, and I pass it up because I got another dog, I probably will never get back on her list. Because her dogs are so in demand and she gets so many inquiries, it’s not possible to soeak with her to see if I’m even going to be considered.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
As a aidenote, I had a Newfy. I don’t know if i would everr get one again, unless I had a very very good vet. Until you’re a situation where you need a good vet, you don’t know if you have one. I also was unaware of some of the horrific medical issies that can afflict giant breeds. Otherwise, they are very nice dogs.
 

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You need to try and separate the desire/expectation for the dog getting attention and what you find aesthetically appealing yourself (assuming both dogs truly are suitable for you and your lifestyle in other regards).

The reality there is that most people who are going to fuss over dogs are going to fuss over dogs, and most of the ones that will aren't going to know whether it's a rare purebred or an interesting looking mutt, either (and most will assume mutt, or another similar and more common breed or mix),and the ones who aren't going to fuss over dogs aren't going to fuss over dogs, regardless of how striking, pretty or unusual it is. The number of people who will want to a-) fuss over the dog and b-) recognize it as a relatively uncommon breed are VERY VERY FEW.

Franci is also very right that the dog who will draw the most attention is going to be the sweet, well behaved, social dog. That said, intimidating looking and/or large dogs often don't get as much attention as a small or medium sized one, and certainly you can make any dog more likely to be approached with things like a cute bandana.

And I find a lot of people sort of intuitively read dogs on a basic level; the dogs who truly love people tend to be people magnets. Yeah, the odd person decides they really want to be friendly to my 'keep your hands to yourself, thanks' border collie, but in general people give us space - because she's sending zero signals that she wants to engage them. The BC/ACD-X is a freaking magnet - because something as simple as looking at a person and wagging his tail for a second tells them he's open to be approached. So they, you know, approach.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
If I said that one of the breeds was a Standard Poodle, would that change anything? I would not go around with a Poodle in show groom because I would not be showing. I am not fond of that look anyway.
However, Standards are not the most aesthetic dogs and there is a great misconception about Poodles in general.
 

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If I said that one of the breeds was a Standard Poodle, would that change anything? I would not go around with a Poodle in show groom because I would not be showing. I am not fond of that look anyway.
However, Standards are not the most aesthetic dogs and there is a great misconception about Poodles in general.
I will tell you that if you're looking at things like POrtugese Water Dogs or Curly Coated Retrievers, everyone I know who has one gripes a lot about them being mistaken for a-) doodles and b-) Poodles, anyway :p I do prefer the PWD, though. Less bounce.
 

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The big issues is that if I am offered a puppy by rhis one prestigious breeder, and that’s a BIG if, and I pass it up because I got another dog, I probably will never get back on her list. Because her dogs are so in demand and she gets so many inquiries, it’s not possible to soeak with her to see if I’m even going to be considered.
Are you on the list or not? If you can't even get an answer to that question, frankly, I'd just move on, because you're waiting for nothing.

And standard poodles are cool. My brother in law has one. Great dog. I really don't see why you care so much about what people think about your dog. They don't care.

I will tell you that if you're looking at things like POrtugese Water Dogs or Curly Coated Retrievers, everyone I know who has one gripes a lot about them being mistaken for a-) doodles and b-) Poodles, anyway :p I do prefer the PWD, though. Less bounce.
Everything's a 'doodle' nowadays, lol.
 

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I will tell you that if you're looking at things like POrtugese Water Dogs or Curly Coated Retrievers, everyone I know who has one gripes a lot about them being mistaken for a-) doodles and b-) Poodles, anyway :p I do prefer the PWD, though. Less bounce.
Funny enough, my (15lb) doodle mutt got pegged as a PWD at Tractor Supply yesterday. I agree though that anything with curly hair is either a poodle or a doodle to most of the general public.
 

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I didn't get my dream breed as my first dog, and tbh I really don't regret it. I also am really in love with a rare breed, but for me it came down to availability and cost. Not that I couldn't have saved up and waited for the rare breed, but we had an opportunity to get Samwise and it was more practical at the time to set that money aside for vet/supplies.

Sam's a mini poodle, a breed that also fits our criteria and lifestyle well, and a wonderful dog. He wound up being an amazing first dog for us for a lot of reasons, but I still have my heart set on my dream breed for our next puppy. Honestly? Outside of dog events, I'll be surprised if more than a couple people a year recognize the breed (it's Lagotto Romagnolo. 99% of people are going to assume doodle). I'm basing this mostly on the fact that I am that dog nerd who IDs people's rare breeds on the street, and more often than not the reaction is some combination of shock and pleasant surprise - I often get comments about how rare it is that anyone knows the breed!

Researching is one thing, but have you actually met and spent time around dogs of both breeds? That can make a big difference! I've had many more opportunities to meet Lagotti since we've had Sam, and while I'm still positive it's the breed I want, I'm glad I now have more in-person experience with the dogs so I can be sure they really resonate with me. Some breeds look great on paper, but when you meet and interact with them, the magic isn't there. Could be perfectly lovely dogs, but just not for you.
 

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Funny enough, my (15lb) doodle mutt got pegged as a PWD at Tractor Supply yesterday. I agree though that anything with curly hair is either a poodle or a doodle to most of the general public.
I have friends with PWDs and they are awesome and every last one of them is an inch from exploding if someone asks if their dog is a poodle or labradoodle again. I mean good naturedly but the frustration is real. The general public REALLY cannot tell the difference. And does not care, to be honest.
 

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I have friends with PWDs and they are awesome and every last one of them is an inch from exploding if someone asks if their dog is a poodle or labradoodle again. I mean good naturedly but the frustration is real. The general public REALLY cannot tell the difference. And does not care, to be honest.
Yeah they don't, lol. Heck I have a mutt and everyone still thinks she's an Aussie or a border collie, at this point I just ignore it (we did a DNA test and she has no herding dog in her at all).

I didn't know about Lagotti - beautiful dogs. Would totally have confused them with a doodle of some sort too.

Anyway, I agree, getting hung up on one breeder that can't even tell you if you have a chance of being considered for a puppy is not a good thing. Go to dog shows, contact all the breed clubs in the US, get out there to see if there's another opportunity somewhere. And yes, I don't think I've ever met anyone who wish they hadn't got their dog, even if it wasn't the breed they really wanted in the first place... but most people I know don't get dogs they don't feel a bond to either.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Lagotto is the other breed for me as well. I have met some of them as well as Poodles. I have owned dogs before. For a Lagotto, I have a lot of special criteria, so getting a dog from a particular breeder for me is very important. There are a handful of breeders from which I’d actually get one of these dogs and have had bad experiences with quite a few already, which is why I feel this way. There are huge waiting lists for these dogs everywhere but they require a lot of commitment from dedicated breeders to produce stable puppies. So, that’s why if I had a chance to get a puppy from this one breeder, I couldn’t pass it up. However, I can assume that with the number of inquiries she gets, that would be a slim chance.
 

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Honestly, I think people are just gonna assume a Lagotto is a Doodle. Most people've never heard of them, even in the dog world. So I think if you're holding out for the world's reactions, you'll probably be disappointed - in fact, I think there's some prejudice against the breeding of Doodles, yeah? So you're gonna be explaining you've got this rare dog breed, and people are, like, tolerantly nodding...lol.

I mean, all things being equal, I'd take a looker over a more vanilla dog, but all things aren't equal here (price, availability, options, etc). Plus, do you plan to do the grooming yourself? Much easier to find someone who knows how to properly groom a poodle. And don't poodles have fewer genetic health problems? Also, it's not like standard poodles AREN'T eyecatchers.
 

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Honestly, I think people are just gonna assume a Lagotto is a Doodle. Most people've never heard of them, even in the dog world. So I think if you're holding out for the world's reactions, you'll probably be disappointed - in fact, I think there's some prejudice against the breeding of Doodles, yeah? So you're gonna be explaining you've got this rare dog breed, and people are, like, tolerantly nodding...lol.

I mean, all things being equal, I'd take a looker over a more vanilla dog, but all things aren't equal here (price, availability, options, etc). Plus, do you plan to do the grooming yourself? Much easier to find someone who knows how to properly groom a poodle. And don't poodles have fewer genetic health problems? Also, it's not like standard poodles AREN'T eyecatchers.
Yep. I know what a Lagotto is but since its highly unlikely to see one here, I would assume a dog with those looks to be a doodle.

Whereas, a standard poodle does catch my eye (especially with a nice hunting type clip rather than a frufru style cut, personal taste on that but I like the functionally aspect), I think "doodle prejudice" IS a factor and seeing a nice Standard poodle is like an indication that the person got the dog they wanted not the dog that is trendy.

(My boss's wife just bought a Berner-doodle....)
 
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