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When I adopted my first chow I ran in to several groomers that wouldn't groom chows. I was wondering if this is common. I would understand if they had a problem after being introduced but being told no when making an appointment over the phone just doesn't seem right.
 

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In the grooming world it's a stereotype. Chows are "notoriously bad" for grooming and a lot of people buy into that and refuse them out right. I've never had a problem with a Chow.

I personally won't take Malamutes, but not because of a stereotype. I am absolutely terrified of them. I love all dogs, and I am trying to get over my fear, but the salon is not an appropriate place for me to do. I am very nervous and weak around them, and when a dog picks up on that they will get upset and can be more difficult. I don't out right refuse an owner, however, I just give them to another groomer.
 

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The reason a lot of groomers won't take chows is because the breed is hard to read and somewhat unpredictable. This is the type of dog that may not give a warning growl, just go from zero to bite. They are notoriously iffy about having their paws groomed.

But, personally, I would give it a shot. If the dog showed any aggression I would have him sedated with the owner's permission.

A groomer can refuse any dog they do not feel comfortable working on. They may have personal reasons like the above poster said - maybe they are just very scared, or perhaps they have already had a bad experience.

One groom job is not worth an injury that may cut your grooming career short. A bite in the wrong spot can put us out of work for days, weeks, months, or forever.

Keep calling around, you will find someone. But, always be honest about your dog's bite history (if applicable) or any displays of aggression.

If you offered me a vet reference on the dog's behavior while being handled, I would feel 100% better about taking the job.
 

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I won't flat out refuse a dog because of the breed, but I do have certain "prejudices" of my own against some breeds..yes, chows is one of them. I have never had a chow that wasn't aggressive. Never. I know they are out there, just haven't seen them and most of the ones I do see, even the owners are afraid of them and can't/won't put a muzzle on them for me. I muzzle every chow I do now (fortunately, there are few)as soon as they walk in the door. Like stated above, they are extremely unpredicable, hard to read, and will wag their tail with your face in their mouths. I have known WAY too many groomers that have been bitten by chows, and know lots of them that flat out refuse them. I also don't care for shephards either..never had one that didn't try to bite at one point for something. Both those breeds are guarding dogs, leery of strangers, (which to them I am a stranger) and don't care for the grooming process...it also doesn't help that the owners of these breeds rarely have them groomed as often as they should be, so grooming is tedious and can be taxing to the dog.

I agree..if you are uncomfortable grooming any dog/breed, you should not groom it, and should not be required to groom it. Dogs sense fear and apprehension, and grooming a dog you are scared of is not going to benefit anyone involved.

Its not worth the risk. Again, like someone stated above, a bite can go thru ligaments, tendons, into joints, etc. and put us out of work for life! Then how are we to support our families? If I don't feel comfortable grooming a dog (or cat) then they are sent home. I feel bad for the owners of chows, because it is hard to find someone to groom them. I think they have the worst rap in the grooming industry...but I do feel they have earned it.
 

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We don't refuse certain breeds, just certain dogs. We do have our prejudices though. Pugs, Bassets, and Corgis are bad for their nails. Wheatons are spazzes. Weims are spazzes. Poodles are idiots. Etc., etc.

Honestly, we don't get a lot of Chows that come in for grooming. I remember two - one had to be sedated, and the other was the friendliest little thing alive.
 

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LOL, I have those same generalizations..I hope no one with these breeds gets mad, cause I have a few idiots of my own. ;) Just broad generalizations I have accumilated over the years. Of course they aren't ALL this way..

Bad for nails: Pugs, doxies, corgis, GSD, chihuahuas, min pins, schnauzers, airedales

Bad for bathing: Huskies, malamutes, GSD and Bichons...(why do so many Bichons want to stand on their rear legs in the tub?)

Bad for Drying: Cockers (just a little poo ;)huskies, malamutes, labs...did I mention cockers? Airedales

Bad for the groom itself: Chows, huskies, malamutes, GSD, corgi's, doodles,airedales

Again, no offense meant...I have an airedale myself..and I admit, he's an idiot for most of the process. If I didn't love my job, I wouldn't be a groomer. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for all the input. I guess what is truly important is that you have someone who is comfortable with your dog handling them. Again thank you for the candid responses
 

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LOL, I have those same generalizations..I hope no one with these breeds gets mad, cause I have a few idiots of my own. ;) Just broad generalizations I have accumilated over the years. Of course they aren't ALL this way..

Bad for nails: Pugs, doxies, corgis, GSD, chihuahuas, min pins, schnauzers, airedales

Bad for bathing: Huskies, malamutes, GSD and Bichons...(why do so many Bichons want to stand on their rear legs in the tub?)

Bad for Drying: Cockers (just a little poo ;)huskies, malamutes, labs...did I mention cockers? Airedales

Bad for the groom itself: Chows, huskies, malamutes, GSD, corgi's, doodles,airedales

Again, no offense meant...I have an airedale myself..and I admit, he's an idiot for most of the process. If I didn't love my job, I wouldn't be a groomer. :)
This really made me laugh, because all salons I've been in have almost the same list. I definitely feel bad making it, but then I remember what idiots my dogs are for a groom. Except our Elkhound, he's a perfect man for every thing, but the shit fits my mutt throws over her nails (and FORGET velocity drying) and how my doxie essentially must be held in a wrestling hold and stroked for his nails.
 

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the only breeds that we refuse are corded dogs (corded poodle, corded havanese, puli, komondor).

i personally love grooming chows and i'm the main groomer to groom them (most everyone else is too scared). just like with any dog you have to know your limitations. i have never had a problem with the breed... and there are certain dogs that don't like having certain things done but mostly to me it just depends on the dog.

i'm sorry chowguy that people haven't even given your baby a chance... as far as i'm concerned they should at least give you a consultation.
 

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Hey- you forgot WHEATENS!! (for everything)
Yup, don't forget the Wheatens!!!

But that list was pretty much what we see in at the clinic too. I remember one Husky that came in...he screamed at the top of is lungs when we bathed him and was flipped out like no other. Forget blowdrying. When it came time to do his nails, it took four people to hold him down and one to trim all while he was screaming and flipping out. Needless to say, we refused him without sedation the next time.
 

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I'm glad I don't have a dog on this list.

I'd hate for Wally to already get evil looks just because he's one of those breeds. He's not exactly the most confident dog (yet) with the whole grooming thing, last thing he'd need is a groomer that's already wary of him just because he's a certain breed! :D

Fortunately, Wally is always considered one of the best behaved dogs. They just can't stop telling me how good and patient he is every time.

As far as Bichons - I think it's just something they do. Wally isn't a Bichon, but he's related to the Bichon (and is Bichon-sized so sometimes he's called one) and he loves to stand on his hind legs too. He doesn't do it during a bath or while at the groomers, but sometimes I have him put his paws on my head while I'm kneeling so I can get his underside better. He does it like it's a game LOL.
 

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I love German Shepherds (and have two of them myself) and when I first started working in a grooming shop I would get so excited when one would come in for a bath and i'd ask everyone if I could do the dog, I was always surprised when nobody argued and were happy to let me have the dog.

I don't think i've done one well behaved GSD! Mine are fine on nails, drying and the bath (although Pandora does think the dryer is a game and she will bark at it for a minute at first and then be fine)

I now cringe when I see a GSD on the books.

We've had two chows come in regularly that I know of. Both have been excellent dogs and I was pretty surprised. One dog was matted and had to be shaved down and he had that "look" that kept making me think he'd bite me so I did muzzle him for part of the groom just because I was a little leery of the dog. The dog turned out to be a sweetheart.

Two of the groomers in my shop wont do golden or labradoodles. We have several that come in but have to make sure certain people are working who will accept them. I've also heard that the Petsmart across the street from us refuses to do labradoodles. I've had a few people come in with their dog and said petsmart refused because of the breed.

Of all dogs I hate doing labs. I've been bitten badly twice and both times were while bathing a lab and it was sudden, no growling, no nothing just from zero to biting my hand and one lab even latched on. I don't fault the breed so much as backyard breeding with unstable dogs.
 

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Please keep in mind, KB, that because we may know that certain breeds are more difficult to groom, it does mean that we do not like the dog or that we will treat the dog any differently. Everyone gets a fair shot in my shop. Everyone is treated with respect and handled gently. If its not working out, the dog is sent home, unharmed, or we discuss sedation with the vet.

Like Graco said, she knows that dales can be poops for grooming, but she owns one and loves them anyway.
 

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Hey- you forgot WHEATENS!! (for everything)

LMAO! I knew I was forgetting someone!

To the poster that asked what huskies were naughty for besides the bath, just about everything..Again, this is completely generalized from my experience, (every now and then I will get one that is great for everything..just not often) they howl/scream for everything...bathing, drying, brushing (you would think the brush and comb was made of razor blades) spinning on the table, laying in the grooming loop trying to break the grooming arm, pooping, dancing, herky jerky for feet...(they kick like a horse for the back feet)..Scream for ear cleaning, trying to jump off the table..Most huskies I groom do at least 3 of the above, if not all. ;) And like Groovy said, just because we generalize how some breeds are, does NOT mean that they are not all treated kindly and gently regardless. It just means we know what kind of day to expect, how to schedule, etc. because of what types of dogs are on the books. I think if a groomer doesn't like a certain breed, for whatever that reason, and they cannot treat those dogs with the same respect as every other dog, they should be refusing those breeds. Its not fair to the dogs. :) I wish I could find someone willing to hand strip my dale for me, so I wouldn't have to do it! LOL I just bathed him tonite, and he is such a brat for the dryer and his face..and feet...and nails...and ears...hm...well, he is a brat..LOL
 

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When I was working at the Salon we didn't refuse any breed and I worked with each dog. It's hard not to compare one dog of the same breed to the next, but if you do that, it can limit quite a few of your clients.

There were mean Shih tzus, Maltese, Bichons, Labs, etc. but the next one that came along could have been great.

While I was there I only saw one Chow and she was a lover bug. I think it was her first time in to be groomed and she did fantastic all the way through. Not one growl or lift of her lips she stood there through the whole thing.

I was the person that would just go up to the dog whether he had an attitude not, there isn't much that scares me and I've been around enough anti- social dogs to know how to go about handling them. The only dog that really scared me was a 120lbs Akita that was hard to keep on the table. However after working on him a little things cooled down and everything was ok.

Hey- you forgot WHEATENS!! (for everything)
I'm glad I'm not the only one! Every single Wheaten that came in was nutty!
 

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Bad for Drying: Cockers (just a little poo ;)huskies, malamutes, labs...did I mention cockers? Airedales

QUOTE]

Of all dogs I hate doing labs. I've been bitten badly twice and both times were while bathing a lab and it was sudden, no growling, no nothing just from zero to biting my hand and one lab even latched on. I don't fault the breed so much as backyard breeding with unstable dogs.
I think I'm gonna have to video Charlie and Ella's next baths! I open the tub door, they hop up into the tub. They stand for their entire bath, turning when requested. When I switch on the dryer they again stand whilst I power dry them head to toe, no noose required during any of the process. Charlie loves the entire routine, gets very excited if he knows a bath is coming. Ella hates the entire thing, the whole time her head is down and tail is tucked, but she does what I ask when I ask.
 
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