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I've been trying to train Milo to walk to heel on a loose lead but its proving difficult. We go to a training class but we haven't done much on walking, more so the beginnings of it. He'll sit in the heel position and walk a short distance inside without a lead and usually with but when it gets to outside, it's a whole other story. Though he pulls a lot I have to gently tug as well because he's so curious he stays behind to look at a leaf. He seems to find it hard to give me attention when out on a walk and never looks at me, even when I say his name, click, give the recall sound, etc. Other than that his recall is pretty good. I'm just so frustrated!!! I don't know where to even start and every tutorial I look at or watch seems to say something different. Suggestions? :(
 

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Well first, are you looking to teach him a formal heel or loose leash walking?

When Luna 'forgets' how to walk nicely, I've found that immediately turning and going the opposite direction has helped a lot.
 

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Well first, are you looking to teach him a formal heel or loose leash walking?

When Luna 'forgets' how to walk nicely, I've found that immediately turning and going the opposite direction has helped a lot.
I just want for him to happily trot along beside me, so I guess loose leash walking.

We've found it difficult in the past because no matter what direction we turn or walk he just swings himself around and zig zags. We'll keep trying it though to see if it helps a bit more. Thank you for the suggestion!
 

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I just want for him to happily trot along beside me, so I guess loose leash walking.

We've found it difficult in the past because no matter what direction we turn or walk he just swings himself around and zig zags. We'll keep trying it though to see if it helps a bit more. Thank you for the suggestion!
Have you looked into the "Silky Leash" technique? It's something you can train on your own quite easily and I have never seen it fail if properly done, even with rescue dogs that can be set in their ways. It's not an overnight thing but if you put in the time it works. Just do a web search on "Silky Leash" and you'll find many examples.

It isn't formal heeling nor is it intended to be. It is purely pet walking.
 

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Have you looked into the "Silky Leash" technique? It's something you can train on your own quite easily and I have never seen it fail if properly done, even with rescue dogs that can be set in their ways. It's not an overnight thing but if you put in the time it works. Just do a web search on "Silky Leash" and you'll find many examples.

It isn't formal heeling nor is it intended to be. It is purely pet walking.
I haven't heard of it before but I'm definitely going to try it, thanks. :) From what I can see it sounds like it'd work for him. Is it a technique you can use on a normal leash or does it require one specifically?
 

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I haven't heard of it before but I'm definitely going to try it, thanks. :) From what I can see it sounds like it'd work for him. Is it a technique you can use on a normal leash or does it require one specifically?
You can apply the technique with a flat collar, prong collar, martingale collar, slip leash, anything that goes around the neck.
 

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We go to a training class but we haven't done much on walking, more so the beginnings of it. He'll sit in the heel position and walk a short distance inside without a lead and usually with but when it gets to outside, it's a whole other story.
Unless there's a good reason not to, my suggestion would be listen to your instructor and follow their game plan. Some people's method of teaching LLW takes time, by laying a strong, yet very minimalist foundation at first and then building on it gradually, week-by-week. Sometimes it may *seem* to you as if you're not progressing fast enough in your training, but it could all be part of the bigger picture. That's what's important. Perhaps it's even covered more thoroughly and more in-depth in a Level 2 set of classes. If that's the case be prepared to sign up for that too if it helps you to meet your goals. And above all, just be patient.
 

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You can apply the technique with a flat collar, prong collar, martingale collar, slip leash, anything that goes around the neck.
Okay, thanks!

Unless there's a good reason not to, my suggestion would be listen to your instructor and follow their game plan. Some people's method of teaching LLW takes time, by laying a strong, yet very minimalist foundation at first and then building on it gradually, week-by-week. Sometimes it may *seem* to you as if you're not progressing fast enough in your training, but it could all be part of the bigger picture. That's what's important. Perhaps it's even covered more thoroughly and more in-depth in a Level 2 set of classes. If that's the case be prepared to sign up for that too if it helps you to meet your goals. And above all, just be patient.
We're in level two classes right now (just started) and we might be covering it again, we just never really went over it for more than five minutes previously. You're completely right though, thank you for your advice!
 

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Our instructor did say to change direction, act like a tree (didn't work for us) and/or hold a treat close to their nose - walk a little with them smelling it and reward them. We always started and ended form a sit position. The treat way makes them almost at the heel position; we've never perfected the loose leash walk where Zoey is walking alongside. But she will walk in front of me and not pull me around ... close enough for my needs.

Maybe I'll look up that silky leash technique myself!
 

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Try to remember you are walking him because he enjoys it. If he wants to stop and smell occasionally, why not let him? I walk my dog about 2 miles everyday. She will stop about 5 or 6 times to smell something really interesting. I give her a minute, then tell her it is time to go.
 
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