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I am just full of questions for you guys lately.

Here in just under two weeks I will be driving up to the Great White North for a two week camp with my 8 month old lab, Murphy. He's a great camp dog and I'm really excited for the trip!

What I'm unsure about is the giant drive up. It's about 12 hours from here, and I'm doing it in a day (I'm still young :) ). I know we'll need to stop every few hours for some exercise and a potty break. Other questions though:

-How do you actually let your dog exercise at a rest stop? Walking around on a leash isn't that demanding.
-Do you decrease food/water or anything, to compensate for the amount of time he'll just be laying down in the backseat?
-Anyone have experience taking their dog across the US/Canada border? From what I've read I just need his rabies certificate.
-What are good things to take to keep him busy?

Any other stories/experiences to share? I know he'll be great once we arrive, I am just a little anxious about him in the car for that long.
 

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I travel a lot with dogs. Normally they don't eat as much, but water is still important. Be sure he drinks bottled water before the trip, since you shouldn't rely on local water sources.

Exercise is minimal, usually just a brief walk to potty until we get to where we are going.

You should need proof of vaccinations, and also a health certificate. Your vet can verify what paperwork you need before going. Depending on the receiving state/country, usually within 30 to 10 days health certificates are good.

Hate a safe fun trip!
 

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Take your own water if your dog has a sensitive tummy. Crate your dog in the car to keep him safe. Stop every couple of hours, let him potty and stretch his legs for about 10 minutes or so, depending on the size/activity needs of your dog. I feed a normal breakfast before leaving, but my dogs' tummies aren't sensitive. If your dog has an iffy tummy, you might want to give just a small snack for breakfast, or just let him fast - it won't kill him. No food is given on the road; just water.
 

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Pretty much what they said. I travel a lot with my dogs between Alabama and Florida, it's about a 10 hour trip. I usually stop just when I need gas and let them out then. I have a gas guzzler so it's about every 3 to 4 hours. My dogs are older though and are used to it. I tend to search for stations with lots of grassy area and walk them for about 5 to 10 minutes. They do fine, but usually the next day they are a bit more hyper than usual. They travel in their crates. One of mine gets car sick so I don't feed him before we leave. I always bring my own water, but I have ran out a few times and they have been fine.

I have never taken them into Canada. Last time I drove into Canada it was fine, it was getting back into he States that was an ordeal.
 

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We just did our first longer car ride with our puppy. It was under 3 hrs though, so waaaay different in that respect. We exercised him like crazy before we left, and brought assorted stuffed kongs for him for the drive. We also put his sleep crate in the car instead of his normal car crate. Turns out - we didn't need the kongs! He just slept in his bed the whole way.

I would check exactly what you need to get in and out of Canada before you leave! Last thing you need is trouble at the border.
 

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I probably wouldn't take away water. I had an hour trip for Kodi's neutering and even though we had taken up water the night before (it was well into noon by the time I got on the road) he still vomited (less than a mile before we got to the vet, ugh.) It was worse than water vomit, it was mucus, slimy, white, make ME vomit mucus.

My bottom line, I would rather have water vomit than slime vomit.
 

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Microchip and register the chip before leaving. Put a collar w/id tags with your cell ph # and a friend's landline# in it in case he were to get loose. Attach the leash to a harness or a 2nd collar that doen't have the tags on it. Nothing worse than having a dog slip his collar and you are left holding a leash with the collar and ID tags.

Frozen ice packs are great to take along on a long trip for them to lay on in teh summer.

Bring a gallon of water from home to mix in with new water. Sometimes new water tastes different and they won't drink.

Make sure you are ok on flea/tick treatments. Some areas have lots of ticks/fleas.

Pack paper towels/enzyme cleaner/Resolve cleaner in car. Keep a few small trash bags with you in case he throws up in car.

Pack dog food in ziplock bags. Bring more than you think you need in case you run into any delays. You might not be able to get his usual food where you are going, and the last thing you want is to switch foods and have upset stomach to deal with.

Bring doggie first aid kit (Neosporin, Betadine, gauze, Vetwrap, tweezers, scissors, saline solution, Benadryl, aspirin). A pair of dog boots is nice to have in case he were to step on a glass bottle or something while hiking.

Bring extra leash and collar and a 50 foot long line (for more exercise while traveling.)

Bring any meds dog is on, and if he has special med needs, copy of those vet records, and copy of any recent bloodwork if avail. That way if he were to get ill, the vet has something to compare his normal bloodwork with.

Check with vet, and USDA site to determine what paperwork he needs to cross the border into canada, and back into US. It can be different going each way.
 
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