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I know you aren't supposed to let your dog walk on asphalt on hot days. I try not to, but Chloe walks on pavement when there is grass right next to it. It is almost like the heat feels good.
Anyone else have a dog like that?
Last year I left my car in a noon sun on a 90F day with the windows closed for 90 minutes. (no dog in it). No clouds or wind. The car is brown with black interior. It was 110F at the end. Really hot, but not the 150F everything says it will be. With some windows open it would presumably be even less. (and if I weren't stupid enough to get a black interior...)
Just wondering what other people's experiences are.
 

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Well...a woman at our agility club left her dogs in the car on a hot, sunny day after a trial while she ate at a sit-down restaurant, presumably approximately an hour. The vehicle was on, air conditioning blasting. She checked on the dogs midway through the meal. Everything was fine. When she returned at the end of the meal, the air conditioning in her vehicle had gone out, and all four of her dogs were in serious heat distress. Only one of those dogs ended up surviving despite receiving emergency care within minutes. It was an absolute tragedy and profoundly impacted the entire club.

So...yes, leaving dogs or children in hot cars absolutely can kill, if that's what you're wondering...and no, I have not left a thermometer in my car to measure the interior temperature on a hot day, either. I just trust it can kill.
 

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The vehicle was on, air conditioning blasting. She checked on the dogs midway through the meal. Everything was fine. When she returned at the end of the meal, the air conditioning in her vehicle had gone out, and all four of her dogs were in serious heat distress.
In my experience, a lot of car AC works better when the vehicle is in motion. Usually when I'm parked for awhile the air is a lot less effective.

Several years ago, I spent the summer doing delivery driving just as a second side hustle, so there was a lot of sitting in my car. I wouldn't want to leave it idling, so I would turn it off. Even in the shade, and even on a "nice" day, if the windows were up the car became nearly unbearable really quickly. Like, sunny and 70 and I'd feel stifled within about five minutes. Any hotter and rolling down the windows may help, but once you get over 85 or so it doesn't help a whole lot.

Personally, I don't mess with it. I keep my dog in the grass and don't leave him in the car unless he's with a human who can feel the heat themselves and can remove them both from the car if needed.
 

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In my experience, a lot of car AC works better when the vehicle is in motion. Usually when I'm parked for awhile the air is a lot less effective.
Yes, I agree, but she also took her vehicle to a mechanic after the incident and the AC was fully non-operational/malfunctioning and required repair, aside from the fans just blowing air around. She did later learn it was a fairly common problem in the make and model of her vehicle, too, and it just manifested at a really horrible time. I don't know if the vehicle idling for a long time had anything to do with it. It was a lesson for all of us...a simple AC failure can cause tragedy in minutes.
 

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It's not something I'm willing to play with. Unless it would be pleasant for me to sit in the car I don't leave the dogs in it even for a short time. As to the walking on asphalt, on warm days I feel it. If it feels hot, I keep them off. In OP's situation, my dog would be on the grass when the asphalt was hot, whether it preferred the asphalt or not.
 

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I don't take chances with my dogs. They love going for car rides - even if it just means they wait in the car while I run errands. I don't take them if the temps are over 85 OR lower temps if there is no breeze. I also time my trips for morning or evenings when the sun is not at its zenith.

As for asphalt, it really depends on how hot it is and how long. Sometimes, putting your barefeet on hot pavement feels good for a few minutes - but not for a 20-30 minute walk. I would likely let the dog switch back and forth - letting him walk on the pavement for a minute or two (depending on heat) between longer stretches on the grass.

Personally, I do not handle heat well. I get sick if I'm out too long in it. I don't want my pets getting sick like that.
 

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In IGP we train and trial outside. Snow, rain, cold, heat....
We mitigate the heat with reflective shades, battery operated fans, frozen 2qt water bottles, ice, fresh water available....

Yet, when the dogs work on the field heat exhaustion is a real thing. Someone I know did all the mitigation.. and the very good, high level dog got heat exhaustion and bloated. In spite of immediate veterinary attention the dog died.

Two weeks ago I pulled my dog from a trial due to heat concerns....

I would not play Russian Roulette with a hot car.
 

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I have a small round thermometer that resides in the middle HVAC vent. It helps me evaluate how well the AC is working.

It is not uncommon to enter the car, after it has sat in the sun with windows up and find 120F. Highest temperature I have seen? 130F

I would never risk the life of a living creature, human or animal on my car´s air conditioner. There are simply too many single points of failure. Never risk more than you are prepared to lose.


Uncle Foster
 

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I ratted someone out in the Costco parking lot the other week. It was blistering out, the windows were barely down an inch & their short nosed shihtzu was visibly uncomfortable & upset barking. Employee took a photo encompassing both the dog & the licence plate. Costco is not an in and out errand. I don’t understand this behaviour.
 

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A lot of times when a dog dies in a hot car, you hear people saying "but I've done it before!". It's one of those things that could seem 'fine' right up until it's not - and don't forget that your dog's own body heat and moisture will be adding to the sauna inside the vehicle. Not worth the risk.

If the dog has the option of walking on a cooler surface and chooses to walk on a warmer one, I'm not too bothered by that. Obviously if you see signs of burns or tenderness, you may need to enforce only walking on grass for that specific dog, and I would try to be aware of environments that might unintentionally encourage your dog to walk on hotter surfaces than are safe (eg there's a farm across the street and your dog is really interested in the animal smells, so is on the asphalt to get closer to that even though it's painful). There are definitely some dogs who will ignore discomfort and pain if they're in drive or overstimulated. But in most cases, I'd expect them to be able to self regulate so long as they have a cool, safe option available to them, like grass.
 

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Last year I left my car in a noon sun on a 90F day with the windows closed for 90 minutes. (no dog in it). No clouds or wind. The car is brown with black interior. It was 110F at the end. Really hot, but not the 150F everything says it will be. With some windows open it would presumably be even less. (and if I weren't stupid enough to get a black interior...)
Just wondering what other people's experiences are.
Couple of points.

Virtually all cars are currently manufactured with black interiors only. There really are no options, they're either black or dark charcoal grey because those 'go' with whatever colour the exterior happens to be. This is done to save manufacturing costs and streamline production. The days of white, red, green, and tan interiors are pretty much long gone.

As far as temperature in the interior. If you don't think 110F or 120F is all that hot, it would be a more accurate experiment to get into the car yourself and actually just sit there for 20 + minutes with the windows still 'up'. You might even want to try putting on a fur coat, first. I bet your perception will change.
 

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Years ago, when I had my giant black lab, we took my daughter to O'Hare airport very early in the morning to go visit her aunt. The dog was in the car and we expected to be gone before the sun came up.

There was a significant delay in the flight and we couldn't very well leave a 9-year-old girl alone at the gate. By the time we got out, the sun was up and it was hot. The dog had gone through the water we left and was distressed but not yet dangerously so. I think he was getting close.

There was an airport cop driving around looking at cars. I'm guessing someone had called them already.
 

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Yesterday it was 90 degrees here. (32 Celsius.) I was out and encountered a black car with the windows cracked about an inch. Inside was a mostly black dog. Maybe a border collie. No sign of an owner. The car was parked in front of a hair salon, so no reason to think it was going to be a quick in-and-out.

It was parked 20 yards from the police department so I called them and waited until they showed up just minutes later. I was happy to let them deal with it. I would likely have committed several illegal acts. Justified, but still iilegal.
 
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