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I was of the opinion that my dog was deaf. At 12 weeks he didn't show ANY reaction to a shotgun blast, didn't wake up with a clap a whistle or pots clanging. I have had LOTS of pups and have hunted over most. NEVER have I seen a hearing puppy NOT react in some way.
Sooooo we went to NY City where they did a BAER test on the pup.A BAER test is the only 100% reliable method for determining that a dog is deaf (or for measuring the extent of its hearing loss). BAER (pronounced "bear") stands for "Brainstem Auditory Evoked Response" and is a procedure using computers to record the electrical activity of the brain in response to sound stimulation. They do the same test on human infants. It was worth every penny for the consult and the test. The results? He has a brain response when subjected to sound. That is, the sound is picked up by the nerves and transmitted to the brain. What the brain does with it cannot be determined. The veterinary neurologist was amazed at his lack of response to auditory stimuli (whistle & hand clap) and has no idea whether the brain is "processing" sounds into meaning or not. Recently, although his aloof attitude remains, I am getting clear indications that he can hear and that he can respond. The cookie jar opening can be heard. If he's sleeping he won't wake up but if he's awake, he hears it. If I say a sharp "NO!" he seems to get it. Still the vet is surprised at his lack of reaction to any noise.

My question for you all is whether you have run across a situation where a young pup just didn't give a "bleep" about sounds, noises, shotgun blasts and commands etc. Behaving like he was deaf but wasn't. Was that dog harder to train than others?
This guy's housebreaking is pretty tough, I take him out, run him around and sometimes as soon as he walks into the house, he will pee. Generally, he will go to the door when he needs to go out but it's surprising that he might wait till he gets back in to go.
This guy is perplexing.

Any observations?
 

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you know, this is actually interesting. I wonder if dogs that do not have physical response to sound stimuli but have neurological response can be trained in operant conditioning using sound markers.
 

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If he's just not processing sound correctly (humans can have auditory processing disorders, dogs probably can, too), you'll need to train him as a deaf dog. Whether his aural nerves work or not is irrelevant if his brain isn't processing the stimuli.

I suppose it's possible the housetraining difficulties are related, in that if it is a neurological disorder causing his auditory processing problem, that neurological disorder could also cause problems with feeling the need to go or controlling the need to go. However, some dogs are harder to housetrain than others and regression is common in puppies, so I'd say just read the housetraining stickies above and keep at it.
 
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