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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
but now I've just realized my border collie spoiled me. This is going to be harder than I thought, lol. Has anyone else ever had this problem?
 

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Yep, Lady always just seemed to know what I wanted. I can practically have a conversation with her to tell her what I want and she will get the command out of it somehow. When I did obedience for awhile and I taught "finish" I didn't even really teach it to her, I just said the command and she know what I wanted, I'm pretty sure she is actually an alien in a dog costume. Kodi on the other hand is stubborn, and very much a puppy at heart.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I don't think there was anything you couldn't teach Piper in a just a few minutes. It makes it hard to have a different breed after that!
 

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kelton border collie.jpg

My first experience with a dog was in 1973. I was in the 3rd grade and found a stray border collie mix. My parents wouldn't let me keep it, but it hung around the neighborhood.

This dog was incredibly calm and easy to train with bits of cold cuts I stole from our fridge. People thought I had a talent. Thus, I thought I had a talent!

Other breeds of dogs immediately demonstrated how untalented I really was.
 

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Muggsy was an Einstein among dogs. He wanted so much to please and he was so smart, I didn't so much train him as explain what I wanted. I could show him something once, come back a year later and he still knew it.

Kabota is, well, average. He needs actual training- it's so weird! Fortunately, I did have to spend quite a long time training Muggsy to control his dog aggression, so I wasn't totally unprepared, but it has been an adjustment.

My husband says that he'd be way more impressed with all those dog trainers if their demo dogs weren't always border collies. If they could get a blood hound to do those things, then he'd be impressed. :lol:
 

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I agree.

When I've heard of expert dog trainers giving a demonstration, I always think, "please don't show up with a Border Collie as the 'demonstration' dog".

My half distracted, 3rd grader brain had an easy time of it with that border collie stray and I had no idea what "heel" meant at the time.

I remember that the dog would do anything for me, but she did not like to be embraced or cuddled... as you can see from her body language. Now, if I had thought to work on that, I bet she would've cuddled on command.

If I had someone staying at home all day, I would probably get a border collie. I'd hate to leave one of those little geniuses home alone too long.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I agree.

When I've heard of expert dog trainers giving a demonstration, I always think, "please don't show up with a Border Collie as the 'demonstration' dog".

My half distracted, 3rd grader brain had an easy time of it with that border collie stray and I had no idea what "heel" meant at the time.

I remember that the dog would do anything for me, but she did not like to be embraced or cuddled... as you can see from her body language. Now, if I had thought to work on that, I bet she would've cuddled on command.

If I had someone staying at home all day, I would probably get a border collie. I'd hate to leave one of those little geniuses home alone too long.
Piper was very loving from a distance. She didn't want to cuddle either, but she never wanted you out of her sight. I thought it was strange, but I wonder if that's a border collie thing now, ha.
 

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The above replies say a lot and sometimes very hard for people to understand, one or two dogs does not make one a competent trainer, amateur or otherwise, but through the years I have met many who thought they were and knew every thing they needed to know and did not mind planting the title of "Dog Trainer" on themselves.

It does not mean they are bad people, unless they are trying to sell their training services (that's fraud) it just means they did a very good job on one or two dogs, no more, no less.
 

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Absolutely! Valen was a Sheltie and picked up on what I wanted from him with very little in the way of actual training. If I'd had any idea of what I was actually doing, he would have been amazing. As it is, he was pretty darned impressive.

Mercy on the other hand, is an Akita/JRT mix, independant to the core. The first thing I needed to teach her was how to learn. Since she's gotten the hang of that, she's been much easier to train.

Of the two of them, Mercy is definitely the more gratifying. I look at her when she's holding her down-stay and think "I taught her that! She's a better dog because of me." Then she loses her mind and tears around the living room and I think "But we've still got a long way to go." :)
 

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100% yes ... I had a couple dogs over the years that were just plain easy dogs, and a few that were very independent thinkers, and some who were just not able to get it ... and one here as of last year that I believe gave me a few more gray hairs! Lol! Much of what you train depends on the individual dog. :)

My newest ... Eddee ... is going to give me a run for my money for sure ... he is one of those independent ones! Lol!
 

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When I was a kid, our rottweiler and I would do everything together... you know, de-root trees, terrorize my father's neatly organized sand heaps on the farm (by flattening them within half an hour)... as a kid it was like he always knew what I wanted. My current rottie Rocky really listened pretty well until he was in his adolescent stage... and that's when you really start feeling like a bad trainer! :D But, patience, time, we got out of it fine. ;) He's a well behaved gentleman who looks after my mother in South Africa, and has very good manners (most of the time) :D
 

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I thought Bichon's were supposed to be trainable as they used to perform in circuses, but not mine! She is so stubborn and independent, she doesn't really care so much about 'pleasing' me as she does about 'what's in it for me??'. This is getting slightly better as we grow closer, but she's always been a strong minded girl
 

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Haha this thread! I'm new to all of this as Bob and Sacha are my first dogs as an adult. I am always so disappointed when I go to a youtube video, and there's a Border Collie, or it's clear the dog already knows the trick really well. kikopup tends to have better videos, but even her results are hard for me to replicate.
 

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The above replies say a lot and sometimes very hard for people to understand, one or two dogs does not make one a competent trainer, amateur or otherwise, but through the years I have met many who thought they were and knew every thing they needed to know and did not mind planting the title of "Dog Trainer" on themselves.

It does not mean they are bad people, unless they are trying to sell their training services (that's fraud) it just means they did a very good job on one or two dogs, no more, no less.

As far as just doing a good job on one dog well, considering where this dog was, I consider that an achievement of sorts. It's obviously much more than his previous owners did for him. People can consider me incompetent if they wish, but if any incompetent person can help a fearful dog - why didn't anyone help Wally before me, considering this incompetent first-time dog owner could do it?

I thought Bichon's were supposed to be trainable as they used to perform in circuses, but not mine! She is so stubborn and independent, she doesn't really care so much about 'pleasing' me as she does about 'what's in it for me??'. This is getting slightly better as we grow closer, but she's always been a strong minded girl

Not stubborn - you haven't found her motivation yet. As far as "what's in it for me??" USE IT. Find something she wants, then hold it hostage.

You'll figure it out - but try to keep that "she's being stubborn" thinking out of it. Find her motivators and you'll have her right where you want her.
 

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I think it's all about understanding what you're doing and not just doing something because "it has worked for my parents and all 4 of my dogs growing up". The latter method is blindly approaching a problem, a little bit like trying to fix a car by banging on the hood. It may or may not work, but just because it works doesn't mean you understand it and certainly doesn't make you a good car mechanic.

Probably, most people don't realize that there is a science and methodology behind dog training. If you understand the concepts, dog behavior and training becomes a much clearer picture.
 

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As far as just doing a good job on one dog well, considering where this dog was, I consider that an achievement of sorts. It's obviously much more than his previous owners did for him.
Of course it's an achievement and I'll bet Wally is thankful somebody cared and acted for him.
 

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I bow to you and Wally, always amazed at the new tricks that Wally learns each week... "Guys, Wally just learned to drive my truck, but I can't figure out how to get him to stick shift ..." Well, I can't even get my dog to drive. But he can see better'n me, so I get him to read the signs for me :)


..... Ouch, I feel that I was just dino-snarked, just missed being a snack :)
 

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but now I've just realized my border collie spoiled me. This is going to be harder than I thought, lol. Has anyone else ever had this problem?
the tough dogs are the ones you truly learn from. If you both survive.(unfortunately the second part is not always a joke)
 
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