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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
So Isobel is amazing and doing very, VERY well with us in her new home. Giving serious thought to adopting another. Not littermate, but close in age...she is approximately 14-15 weeks, he is 11-12. So opposite genders, both fixed. Will most likely be close in size, she a spanador, him an aussie lab mix.

Advice? Suggestions? We are committed to Isobel and would be as committed to another if we take the plunge. Just a little nervous since things are going soooo well...don't want to make Izzy worried/threatened/etc. So it is a tough decision and not one we're taking lightly.



Would appreciate any feedback or advice. Thanks!
 

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No way would I add a second young dog to a household with another similar age dog under 9-12 months. Honestly, you most likely have not yet entered the most time consuming and energy intensive part of puppy raising yet. You also don't yet have a strong bond with your pup, a strong basis of simple commands even under distraction, nor a good feel for the dog's full adult personality.

Give it a year. Then see where you might imagine another puppy fits (or does not fit) into the household dynamics
 

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I definitely wouldn't be adding another puppy. Two puppies is at least 3 times the work. You will have to make sure you do things with them separately (walks, training, outings, etc). Google littermate syndrome.

Take that motivation for another puppy and dump it into the current one you have now. Sign up for classes, work on house manners, etc. You'll be thankful when you have a very nice adult dog in a year or two. And THEN think about another puppy :)

And, as a final thought... don't fix what isn't broken ;)
 

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Littermate syndrome can still occur even if the pups aren't littermates. It can occur in dogs who are close together in age, just like the second you are considering adopting.

And two puppies are like four times the work, not two! You would have to do absolutely everything separately to ensure they develop a bond with their humans, not each other. They might be okay to deal with when they're itty bitty, but when they hit that 6-9 month old stage....good god almighty. One is plenty! If you still want two dogs when Izzy is around 1.5-2 years old and you know pretty well what kind of adult she will be, then you might consider it.
 

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I would wait until the first one is past the teenage stage, housebroken/not getting into anything anymore. We got our second pup when the first one was 7 months and it was totally fine, but he was past the chewing everything stage, housebroken etc.

We waited until our last one was 18 months before getting another dog, and we got another 1yo instead of a puppy, and a much calmer breed, because it would just have been crazy (she does have some barking issues, I didn't want a pup to pick up from that).
 

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I agree with what everyone else has said. Plus, I'll add that if you get two pups so close in age, you will wind up with two seniors at the same time, which can present its own challenge in dealing with potential "old age" health problems.

My two girls are nearly seven and five, which is actually closer than I prefer, but that's how it happened. I'm considering getting a puppy in 2020.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Well, my husband and I had a long talk last night that stretched into the morning. We might get a male pup down the road but decided to wait at least 6 months. Isobel is doing amazingly well with training, and is a real cuddlebug, and we don't want to risk any setbacks for now. She was taken from her mommy too soon and needs a little more TLC, we think, to really feel secure.

It's tough because the little guy we were looking at seems terrific, but it just might be too much for now...not for us necessarily, but for Izzy.
 

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Well, my husband and I had a long talk last night that stretched into the morning. We might get a male pup down the road but decided to wait at least 6 months. Isobel is doing amazingly well with training, and is a real cuddlebug, and we don't want to risk any setbacks for now. She was taken from her mommy too soon and needs a little more TLC, we think, to really feel secure.

It's tough because the little guy we were looking at seems terrific, but it just might be too much for now...not for us necessarily, but for Izzy.
I think that's a wise decision.

Puppies are highly adoptable, especially that kind of mix, so I'm sure that pup will get a great home. There will always be puppies that fit your needs/wants when the time is right. No need to rush it. It's easy to fall in love with a picture - you'll do it again at a better time :)
 

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I agree with what everyone else has said. I think you made the right decision to wait.

Pepper had just barely turned 2 when we got Kane. Looking back I wish we had spent more time just enjoying Pepper and her being out of the puppy phase for a while before adding another puppy and getting right back into the whirlwind we were only just getting out of. Two dogs is A LOT more work than one. Way more than you think it will be.

Enjoy these puppy times with your current puppy. There's no rush to get another :)
 

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6 months is still immature they may not be nurturing at all to a new puppy. they can still be in the MINE all about ME and I can take and bully a younger pup stage. 7 months is puppy changing to an adult with still a puppy brain. they not always going to see a new puppy as a baby to be gentle with more like a litter mate, competition and easy to bully. Can be an individual breed or breed or it could be smooth sailing for the two to be best pals for life. It is a critical age for a growing pup. only food for thought. that your pup will need your support on how to be good with the new puppy and help you take care of a new pup in the house. That there would be nothing wrong with your pup being pushy and not nurturing to a new pup.. Just that he needs your help to him gets past that 7 month change to be a good big brother to the new baby as well as insure new baby learns the rules as well.. . Don't leave it all up to your pup to correct the new pup, 7 months old they still correct like litter mates and not like an older dog that has learned and refined restraints to correct for learning.

I've done litter mates and depending on the individual growing pup where they are in their training success I usually for my GSD's feel they ready to help with a new pup at 1 years old. Changing to a more intense breed I've waited until they were over two and were ready to help me raise a new pup. Nothing but chaos and poor foundation learning for both pups when the older pup still needs your full attention and needs more maturing. Not worth it.. Good luck glad your puppy is doing so well and in such a loving home.
 
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