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I really like pugs. I was wondering if you could give me any information that is specific to this breed such as general health concerns or temperament issues.
 

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Heya!

I actually just adopted a 4 year old spayed Pug from a reputable breeder.

They are generally a very friendly, out-going breed that loves affection. So, a Pug would not be a very ideal watch dog ;)

However, they do have a good bit of health issues due to being bred down to their size. They are actually the smallest Mastiff. They normally make a lot of noise when they breath with their mouth open. Kind of like constant grunts. They are known for snorts, grunts, and snoring. If you want a dog that sleeps with you, but don't like snoring...might wanna steer clear. They can develop certain breathing related heath problems later on in life as well, but this shouldn't be much of an issue if your Pug comes from a good genetic background. They are also more prone to eye related injuries and ailments because of their bulging eyes. Their face wrinkles need to be cleaned very often or the skin in the wrinkle can become irritated and lead to illness. They are also known for their flatulence and being a bit more smellier than other breeds. Their nails can grow real fast, so they have to be trimmed regularly.
Oh, they also drool and shed A LOT. Expect to be covered in hair all the time.

But if you really want a constant, loving companion, then this breed is awesome. We love ours! Actually, she's snoring now!

Good luck and try going to some Pug rescues and seeing if there's an older Pug for you. All the awesomeness of a Pug minus the "puppy years"! =D
 

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I have always heard they are awesome dogs! Great info given already, only thing I can think of is they are not tolerant of heat. They can overheat very easy because of their short nose, all squished face dogs have some problem with heat. My griff can't stay outside but about 10 minutes after it gets really hot or he starts having trouble breathing.

Good luck!
 

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I don't have much time to write here, but yes Pugs are fabulous dogs. They do have health issues just like any other breed.

I have to clarify something said above - my pug never drools - ever. Neither do any of the other pugs I know. That is certainly NOT a common trait! Well bred pugs also don't snort, snore or breathe heavy all the time either. Chloe will snore sometimes, but only if laying in a funny position.

They are prone to MCT's, PDE, eye problems and luxtating patellas (sp???). They shed a ton but you get used to it. They require a lot more exercise than you'll read about! Chloe is very active and can easily walk 2 miles and be up for more.

They can be couch potatoes when they want to, but they DO require regular daily exercise as they can become overweight fast. Chloe was very easy to housetrain and train in general. She is a great dog! Do a ton more research on them and find a quality breeder through the Pug Dog Club of America or adopt through a reputable rescue.

Good luck! If you have any more specific questions, post them and I'll log in later to answer.
 

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However, they do have a good bit of health issues due to being bred down to their size. They are actually the smallest Mastiff
Not true, though I'm not suprised you've read this. There are a few Pug books out there that insist on repeating this myth. I've quoted an article detailing the real history of the Pug here:
The Pug, one of the oldest breeds, has flourished true to his breed down through the ages from before 400 B.C. He has always been domesticated and has endeared himself to mankind.

The truth of how the Pug came into existence is shrouded in mystery, but authorities are agreed that he is of Oriental origin with some basic similarities to the Pekingese. China, where the breed was the pet of the Buddhist monasteries in Tibet, is its earliest known source. It next appeared in Japan, and then in Europe, where it became the favorite for various royal courts.
I agree with everything Sunshyne has said, Pugs definitely don't drool, but they can snort, snuffle and snore. Kuma only snorts when he's very excited, but he does snore at times. They are much higher energy then most people realize, and do shed enormously, 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. I've mostly given up wearing black and dark brown due to the shedding, just not worth the lint brushing, lol.

While Sunshyne had a great experience in housetraining Chloe, they do tend to be a challenge to house train, and on average it takes a good year before they can be considered fully reliable. They are very intelligent and respond well to positive reinforcement, but be aware, it still takes a lot of creative training to have a well behaved Pug. They are master manipulators, and definitely can have a "what's in it for me?" attitude. They also love to attempt to manipulate any training you've done to get the most treats, lol. As an example, we taught Kuma to drop anything he has when we tell him "off". It took him about 5 minutes to figure out that he could get more treats if he stole more items, lol. A sense of humour when training Pugs is an absolute must!

They do have a number of potential health issues, as Sunshyne mentioned, so going to a reputable breeder is an absolute must!

Here is a good link with a great deal of great information on Pugs, their pro's and cons, potential health issues, etc. The only thing I would disagree with is the labeling of Pugs as sedentary, my experience is that Pugs are actually very energetic dogs, only slowing down with age. There is also a great forum available at this link with some wonderfully knowledageable people who would more than willing to answer any questions you might have. http://pugvillage.com/

Phew, sorry about the letter had a lot to say, lol. I love Pugs dearly, I'll never be without at least one in my life, but they're not the right dog for everyone. Do tons of research, make sure you go to either a reputable breeder or rescue organization, and you'll be fine. :) Any other questions, give me or Sunshyne a shout, we'll be happy to help. :)
 

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ill tell you this as a pug owner of about a week now :) i rescued a 3 year old boy from the shelter and i couldt be happier. i read up about pugs for a loooong time before looking at shelter and rescues for one and now that hes home everything ive read he is and does. something that i did notice was not an understatement was about the shedding...wow they werent kidding, its not about getting not to shed so much as just containment, just a little vac here and a little lint roller there and its not that bad. they do make aot of funny noises and when they sleep so if u cant handle snorting, snoring, at night when u sleep then keep researching breeds. im overall very very happy, snoopy is very loving and loyal and so smart and obedient and a quick learner.
 

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Thanks, Kuma. I hadn't realized the Mastiff thing is just a myth.

Also, I should have clarified what I meant by "drooling". I just know that Cambria normally drools from water getting trapped in her folds after she has drank. We normally end up finding little puddles of water left from her napping on the hard floor after a nice drink of water. ;)

Cambria comes from excellent breeding stock and she still grunts and snorts as she breaths. Only when her mouth is open though. I'm sure each Pug can be a little different with their noises. Ours makes a lot, but we find it very endearing. =D
 

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Oh, ok, you're right on that then! Chloe leaves some drips after drinking too. I thought you meant full on drooling!

Chloe was purchased by me from a responsible breeder (shows, health tests for everything, etc) and she still has had some health problems. They are not in the genetic history anywhere. Vet is at a loss, and I have easily spend thousands of dollars on her care the past year and a half. So, you're taking a chance no matter where you get a dog from. But please do not buy a pug from a pet store as they can have health issues even through responsible breeding.

I'll say again, they are fun little dogs! They can hold their own with big dogs and certainly are not your typical toy breed. They live for their humans, and crave attention. Not prone to SA, but usually they will be your shadow in the house. I compare her to a cat sometimes, she is always at my feet. Most pugs are food motivated so training them can be easy. I haven't found Chloe to be stubborn but I have heard that about the breed. She'll do just about anything for a piece of cheese, and we've taught her some funny tricks using it! She is actually a lot better trained and better behaved than the lab next door. They are known to be great with kids and people in general (my experience as well).

Depending on where you live, spay/neutering can be more expensive because they are a small breed. I paid about $410 for Chloe's spay. Grooming is easy, but you have to keep up with brushing. They seem to never stop shedding, but brushing daily helps a little.

You also have to clean the nose roll, eyes and ears on an at least weekly basis as infection can present itself quickly due to the wrinkles. It has just become part of our routine, though, and it's no big deal anymore.
 
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