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Discussion Starter #1
Our fam is thinking about adopting a dog from our nearby humane society and we narrowed it down to 3 we like.

Oliver (German Shepard/Blue Hound Mix)
http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y34/Truesonic/dog/IL6813517266-2-x.jpg
http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y34/Truesonic/dog/IL6813517266-3-x.jpg
http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y34/Truesonic/dog/IL6813517266-1-x.jpg

Oscar (German Shepard/Blue Hound Mix)
http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y34/Truesonic/dog/IL6813517247-3-x.jpg
http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y34/Truesonic/dog/IL6813517247-2-x.jpg
http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y34/Truesonic/dog/IL6813517247-1-x.jpg

Both Oscar and Oliver
http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y34/Truesonic/dog/IL6813517342-1-x.jpg
http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y34/Truesonic/dog/IL6813517342-2-x.jpg

The other dog we are thinking about adopting is a rottie mix pup but the adoption center isn't sure what other breed he's mixed with. Unfortunately they didn't have a picture of him on their site. Is there anything we should know about these breeds specifically? For first time dog owners like ourselves which one would you recommend? We have done research on each of the dog breeds but would like advice from those who might have experience with them.
 

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There's no such breed as a 'blue hound' - maybe you mean Bluetick Coonhound? (this seems really unlikely given what they look like) :p Or Greyhound? (also unlikely) :p To be honest, both those cuties look like good old muttly muts- I doubt they're a mix of two purebred parents. Size, adult energy level, and personality are going to be pretty hard to predict.
 

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There's no such breed as a 'blue hound' - maybe you mean Bluetick Coonhound? (this seems really unlikely given what they look like) :p Or Greyhound? (also unlikely) :p To be honest, both those cuties look like good old muttly muts- I doubt they're a mix of two purebred parents. Size, adult energy level, and personality are going to be pretty hard to predict.
This makes a lot of sense. I think the OP should read (if he/she hasn't already) more general dog books rather than breed-specific ones.

Oh and thank you for considering adopting a good, innocent dog in need of a home. Rescue dogs can be truly wonderful companions. Mine is!
 

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Both puppies are adorable. To me they look Like German Shepherd/ maybe collie mixes. They are wonderfully cute puppies. Good luck to you with whichever one you chose. God bless you for deciding to rescue a pup. :)
 

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Oh, these guys are adorable! Good luck deciding, or is there a chance you'll get both?

I don't have first-hand experience with any of the breeds listed, but I'm sure you'll get good info from others who do.

Let us know what you decide. And thank you for adopting.
 

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Whatever you choose, can I have the other one? :D

Seriously, though, I've no experience with puppies, but the best advice I ever got was that all (well, most) dogs are cute, but not all behave in a way suited to live with you. If you have a choice, pick the one whose behavior is best suited to your home, not the one that melts your heart; the difficulty with puppies is that you're trying to predict their adult personality based on their childhood behavior.
 

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they are adorable! thank you for choosing to adopt.
it is a tie for them both; but i would go with the one that has the better personality. it is hard to tell from the pics, but oscar seems to have a better temperment because of his open mouth shots... try the puppy test to see which one has the better temperment. a simple test is to hold puppy down gently on its back with hand on chest and gently keep your hand there to see if the puppy squirms and fights, does it get angry and try to bite? does it calm down? the ones that fight and bite might be harder to train. this is essential if you are a first time dog owner...
good luck and any pup you take would be very lucky.
 

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I'm not a fan of looking at just specific breeds if all you're looking for is a companion animal. Look for a dog who's energy level is the same or lower than yours. You don't want a dog who wants to run 5 miles a day if you're a couch potato. On the other hand, if you do want to run 5 miles a day you don't want a dog who's a couch potato either. You can find different energy levels within the same breed of dog. I've seen basset hounds who I swore would not sit still.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
All of you guys have given me great advice, we decided to go with adopting since most of those dogs don't get second chances ya know? We're still stuck deciding between Oscar, Oliver and Patrick (the rottie mix pup). I appreciate the responses you all have given.

According to their adoption pages Oscar is a little more laid back than his brother. Oliver is a little more outgoing than his brother.

http://www.petfinder.com/petnote/displaypet.cgi?petid=13517247
http://www.petfinder.com/petnote/displaypet.cgi?petid=13517266
 

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Oscar is so cute, I just wanna squeeze him till he pops! I just adopted my first dog from a shelter and he's a huge sweetheart. Since your pups are little you probably won't have to deal with any personality issues related to being abandoned, but the shelter I got Rufus from let me foster him for a week before signing the papers. It was a good way to see what his personality was like and how he got along with other dogs. Good luck and enjoy the new pup!
 

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Look like nice pups but some things to think about:
- did the shelter say how long they have been separated from their mother and litter mates? If separated too early can have behavior problems.
- any info on health, temperament of parents ? Any chance to see the mother at least? Again, you want to avoid problems

Not trying to rain on your parade, but I always advise first time dog owners to ignore all the 'rescue' palava and make sure they get a pup which is starting with a clean slate - ie healthy good tempered parents and properly brought up by its mother and owners for its first 8 weeks. That usually means going to a breeder, be it a pro or someone in their back yard or farm where you can see the mother at least and the litter. Advice goes double for large breed dogs like GSD (which I love). Its going to be your dog for a long time. If you are 100% confident in yourself in respect of training a dog with problems then go for either one of them but otherwise ........
 

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Not trying to rain on your parade, but I always advise first time dog owners to ignore all the 'rescue' palava and make sure they get a pup which is starting with a clean slate
I could not disagree more with you. I would advise the exact opposite. New owners often are not the most educated and even if they are, they're not the most experienced (by definition) of dog owners. Puppies are a crap shoot. You don't know how big they're going to get. You don't know what behavior tendencies they're going to have. You don't know what motivates them training wise. You don't know anything about them really except that they're cute. The rest is just educated guesses.

When you get an adult dog you know what you're getting. You can adopt one that is housetrained saving you the headache of 3 am trips to the yard and cleaning up messes in the house. You already know their personality and their size. You already know what motivates them training wise. You know what problems (if any) that they have. It's much, much easier for an inexperienced owner to walk into a situation where they know all the variables.
 

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I could not disagree more with you. I would advise the exact opposite. New owners often are not the most educated and even if they are, they're not the most experienced (by definition) of dog owners. Puppies are a crap shoot. You don't know how big they're going to get. You don't know what behavior tendencies they're going to have. You don't know what motivates them training wise. You don't know anything about them really except that they're cute. The rest is just educated guesses.

When you get an adult dog you know what you're getting. You can adopt one that is housetrained saving you the headache of 3 am trips to the yard and cleaning up messes in the house. You already know their personality and their size. You already know what motivates them training wise. You know what problems (if any) that they have. It's much, much easier for an inexperienced owner to walk into a situation where they know all the variables.
I agree and am very glad the first dog I got was a young adult (whose birthday I'm celebrating today actually!)
 

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The OP is getting a puppy not an adult dog. Take a look at the pics. IMHO an adult dog would likely be an even bigger mistake but that's a different debate.
 

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IMHO an adult dog would likely be an even bigger mistake but that's a different debate.
I think you are completely and totally wrong. Why do people typically turn dogs over to shelters? Let's look at the top 10 reasons from petrescue.com and see which of them apply more to puppies and which ones to adult dogs. I use this example because I would bet that most people who relinquish dogs are new and/or inexperienced owners.

Dogs:

1. Moving (7%) - would apply to pups and adults equally.
2. Landlord not allowing pet (6%) - would apply to both equally
3. Too many animals in household (4%) - again, would apply to both equally
4. Cost of pet maintenance (5%) - pups are going to be more expensive. They require more shots and possibly a s/n. They grow so new crates/collars are required periodically. They also tend to be harder on toys as toys that are fine one month suddenly are destroyed as the pup grows and is now a more powerful chewer.
5. Owner having personal problems (4%) - would apply to pups and adults
6. Inadequate facilities (4%) - would possibly apply to adults more as they're larger than puppies. A puppy will run into this barrier eventually though.
7. No homes available for litter mates (3%) - Obviously this wouldn't apply to adults.
8. Having no time for pet (4%) - What is more of a time commitment? A puppy or an adult? Obviously a puppy.
9. Pet illness(es) (4%) - could apply equally to both
10. Biting (3%) - Almost all puppies are biters. Adults are either biters or they aren't and you know it before you adopt one.

Obviously far more of these reasons apply to puppies than adults. If you adopt a puppy you must be prepared to spend more money than with an adult. You must be prepared to endure 3 am trips to the yard for the first 3-6 mos or more. You must crate train from ground zero, house train from ground zero, and do basic obedience training (recall, sit, leash walking, etc..) or pay someone to do this for you. You have to teach the puppy not to chew on the furniture, jump on the guests, etc.... In return, you get nothing that you couldn't get from an adult dog. If you adopt an adult dog you can get a dog who is already housebroken, crate trained, leash trained, knows basic obedience as well as basic canine manners. You get the same love, affection and companionship that you would get from a puppy. Plus, with the adult dog you know how big he/she is going to be, how much they will shed, etc... If they have behavioral issues, you know all of them in advance and can prepare yourself to deal with them instead of having them surprise you.

I adopted a 1.5 yr old cocker spaniel. I never had to deal with puppy headaches and got a loyal companion to boot. He already knew not to dig in the trash, drink from the toilet, pee in the house, chew on the furniture, etc... I would not recommend that anyone adopt a puppy unless they can afford to spend 6-8 hours a day at least supervising the puppy. That's a big time commitment.
 

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If they [an adult dog you are adopting] have behavioral issues, you know all of them in advance and can prepare yourself to deal with them instead of having them surprise you.
Well that is where you are wrong and that is one of the biggest reasons to get a pup. But as I said, it is a different debate and I don't want to hijack this thread.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Thank you all for your advice and kind words, unfortunately the shelter said Oscar and Oliver were adopted despite them not being available until May 5th. This saddens me because we asked them if we could put our names on a waiting list for them or if there was a certain time we were supposed to come back to find out about their availability, to which they said no. Turns out on Monday some people came in and adopted them much to our surprise today...

Our last option was the rottie mix pup, he's 3 and a half months old. He's a bit on the chubby side and is adorable. The shelter isn't sure what breed he is mixed with or what the mother or father was. I wish I had his picture to show you guys but we lack a good scanner.

This is his page but still no picture.
http://www.petfinder.com/petnote/displaypet.cgi?petid=13559978

We have a few concerns because they said his brother and sister died of parvo, but they said he was separated from them so he wasn't effected. Also we love the little guy now but since we (not counting our mother) has never had dog experience we're concerned about getting a large breed even if he is a rottie mix.

We put a holding fee on him so he doesn't get adopted or put down before we can make our decision and we have until Wednesday to either take the money back or adopt him. Can anyone please give some advice about rotts/rottie mixes?

PS: We'll try to get a picture of him scanned online ASAP.
 

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Well, I can give you some information on Rotties as I have owned them for 30 years now. :) I think they are an amazing breed of dog. In the RIGHT home, when they are properly trained and socialized, I believe there is no better family dog. That said, you need to be honest as to whether or not you ARE that RIGHT home. Rottweiler's require constant socialization throughout their lives. They also need firm but positive training from an early age and continuing much beyond puppy classes.

Getting a Rottie mix from a shelter is pretty hard to say what his temperament might be like. I have rescued many adults and puppies and never had any problems beyond need for training and socializing. (a LOT of it)

The one thing about getting a Rottie mix from shelters is that ..... more often then not, it seems, they are wrong in identifying the breeds. It seems, everything that comes in that is black and tan is a Rottie or Rottie mix. Unless the mother was the Rottie and they were born there, it is a good possibility that it is a different mix. Pictures will help. :) I can't wait to see them. Nothing cuter then a Rottweiler puppy. IMO

How much time are you willing to dedicate to the training and socializing of this puppy? This is definitely NOT a breed that does well tied up in the back yard or left on it's own too much. They are extremely dedicated to their people and want to be around them all the time. Yup, even when you go in the bathroom puppy will more then likely wish to come along with you. I move from room to room of my house with 2 Rotties following behind every move. I take my dogs to training classes a few days a week and socialize them at pet stores, parks etc... on weekends. I cannot stress enough the need for that. Getting puppy of any breed into classes with a good positive trainer is very important.
Check with your home owners insurance as to whether or not they have any NO Rottweiler clauses. Though if he looks like a mix, you can usually get away with just saying "Mix"

I know there are like 1000 or more folks on here that might argue with me on this, but I think Rottweiler's are the best breed there is. :) Mixes included. Look at Mudra's Xena. she is a Rottweiler mix and is a lovely puppy.
 
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