Puppy Forum and Dog Forums banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
There are set of rules that you need to follow in training your dog but there are also things that you should not do. The following are simple guidelines you can follow to avoid making the training session a disaster.
1. Do not allow your dog to sit on a sofa or sleep in bed. When your dog sits or walks in your front move your dog using your foot. This will show him that he always needs to obey your command as a leader. The dog needs to know that you are the alpha and therefore you should be followed at all times.

2. Do not feed your canine companion with the food from your plate. He should learn that he can only eat after you finish your food. As a member of the pack they could not eat together with you.

3. Never hit your dog for misdemeanor. You can use a disapproving tone in your voice to let him that you are not approving his action. There are leash and collars that you can use to correct some of their behavior.

4. Never permit your dog to chew you socks, shoes or furniture. To prevent your puppy from eating your things use a bitter apple spray. This is an anti-chewing formula that will prevent the dog from chewing the object of his interest. This is proven to be safe and non-toxic. You can simply spray this solution on objects that can easily be reached by your dog. Bitter apple spray is available in the pet store or you can also make your own formula at home.

5. Do not leave your dog alone for a long period of time. Lonely dog can develop hostility towards other dog or people which can be a root cause of dog aggression. Dog are pack animals. They have a required amount of social interaction every day.

6. Do not disregard if your dog licks or bites your fingers. This may develop to a serious behavior problem when they reach their adulthood. Dog biting can start from a light biting habit until it becomes harder. Ignoring this behavior will cause major problem in the future.

7. Exercise is very important to all dogs. So do not let the day pass by without a dog walking. Dogs are very energetic animals they need a vent to out their excess energy.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
693 Posts
Well, 3, 4, and 7 are reasonable... I guess.

1. Dogs do NOT see people as alphas, nor do they buy into the whole "pack mentality" theory that we humans once adopted to understand them. Pack theory is outdated and disproven.
2. Same. Your dog is not a member of your pack.
5. Dogs are not pack animals.
6. Biting and licking is entirely normal for dogs and a way for them to communicate. In no way does that behavior foretell a serious aggression problem later on in life.

Welcome to the forum, petlover84. Perhaps the best way to start here would be to read a few threads and get involved that way, instead of posting your training commandments and expecting everyone to agree?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
475 Posts
I agree with dmickle on the "3, 4, and 7 are reasonable" point. The rest have a lot of flaws and should not be put off as "blanket statements".

1. My dog has access to the sofa and sleeps in the bed at night. I wouldn't have it any other way. It hasn't made training one lick harder and frankly it never will.

2. My dog can have some of what we're having if it is puppy-safe. We practice NILF (nothing in life is free) -- she must do a few of her commands before she gets even one thing from us -- but it can come right off our plate.

5. Because no one with a full-time job should ever own a dog. Not this again.

I've said it about a hundred times since being a member here, but I'll say it again: Our dog is home alone for well over 8 or 9 hours a day, and at night is sometimes alone in the kitchen though for the last few weeks has been sleeping in the bed with us. She is well-adjusted and easy to train.

6. Maybe biting, if the biting is obviously uninhibited and needs to be curbed a bit, but licking? My dog can lick me all she wants. I'll let you know if she ever becomes viscous over it :wink:


Basically this whole post really sounds like someone has watched a few too many of those dog-training shows...
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
11,513 Posts
Here's some general advice for new members who want to participate on the forum.

Start out with an introduction in the new member section. It doesn't have to contain personal details you're not comfortable revealing, but it's nice to know if you have a dog or are thinking about getting one and a bit about your dog background.

Too many opening posts sound like a copy-and-paste from a questionable source (and often they are) and aren't going to be taken seriously - even if you say, "Trust me. I know what I'm talking about."

Trust here comes slowly. While your'e building that trust, there's no reason you can't participate and enjoy the forum. Tell us some stories about your dog(s) and post some photos. It's fine to have opinions, but we don't like to be preached to.

And before anyone points out the irony of that statement, I'm going to pretend that I've earned the right to preach.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,248 Posts
Thank you, almighty petlover84 for setting us all straight in our training methods! Maybe if you'd spent some time lurking on this forum you'd realize this was a silly thing to post, and not only because half of it is not even true.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,534 Posts
Great way to make friends on a forum full of dog savvy people, some of which have been training dogs for 20+ years (and one or two that have been training for 50+years). I'll chalk it up to not reading through first untill proven otherwise.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top