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Discussion Starter #1
Hello,
The breeder told me today that my future pup - an English Cocker Spaniel -does not hear in one ear.
Her vet assured her that the pup is perfectly fine otherwise but he is deaf in one ear.
Does anyone has a uni dog? Could he lose his hearing in the good ear in the long run ?

What would you do if you were me?
Would you take him? He isn't cheap at all.

Thank you in advance for your help.
 

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He'll most likely function like a normal dog. Plenty of completely deaf dogs can follow directions by watching their owner's hand signals or learning to respond to an e-collar, so a dog who still has partial hearing could do it just fine. You probably won't notice much of a difference between your dog and dogs with full hearing.

Yes, he could lose hearing in the other ear, but many dogs become hard of hearing or deaf as seniors. It's a natural part of aging.

I may ask for a discount, but I would probably still take him, provided the breeder was reputable. Does this breeder health test, do something with her dogs to prove their breeding worthiness? Like conformation, obedience, agility? If this pup is from a backyard breeder, then I would probably skip it...

Really, its up to you. If you don't feel comfortable taking a partially deaf dog, then don't do it.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
she is one of the best breeders in the country.
I met her at the Nationals of ECS where my pup's older sibling from a previous litter of same parents won a prize.
I do not care about prizes or shows. All I wanted was a healthy pup that would live with us for a long time
I am literary broken in two right now. Not sure she would be willing to drop the price. Many others asked about him on Facebook when they saw his pictures
 

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Honestly, I would expect just about zero trouble from that. At most he'll have difficulty locating the source of a sound - ie: Knowing which side it's coming from. That's literally it. It isn't going to shorten his life or impact his quality of life. It certainly won't really require you make any accommodations in your training style or interactions with him. MOST dogs end up hard of hearing/deaf as they get old anyway.

It's not a big deal. It's really really not. I wouldn't even think twice.

I've even done agility with a deaf dog -- totally deaf - and I have a friend doing agility and rally and obedience with a dog who is deaf in one ear. It's literally a non-issue/not a thing. Unilaterally deaf doesn't mean 'hears everything less acutely' it just means the dog doesn't hear in stereo.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thank you for your encouragement.
Do you think it would be OK to ask for a price reduction.
I know now for a fact that I will have to visit the Vet more often to make sure that the good ear is still good.

Thank you
 

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No.

You are purchasing this puppy as a pet. The price you were paying is based on the puppy being sold as a pet. The puppy's ability to be a pet, with a normal life span and normal life are not at all impacted by being deaf in one ear.

The way this puppy was found to be deaf in that ear is Baer testing. The breeder has paid for that. It is not something that needs to be repeated - it's a one time thing. There is no need for vet visits above and beyond normal checkups you would normally be doing with a puppy going forward, and certainly no more than regular exams.

So basically: There is no added expense to you, except that which you choose to take on because of your own anxiety, and there is no negative impact/reduction in the dog's ability to fulfill the purpose for which it is being sold at the price it is being sold at. For me? That means absolute no on lower cost.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
THANK YOU.
Again, I am asking these questions because I have never bought a dog from a breeder and I have never had to deal with a uni dog.
 

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she is one of the best breeders in the country.
I met her at the Nationals of ECS where my pup's older sibling from a previous litter of same parents won a prize.
I do not care about prizes or shows. All I wanted was a healthy pup that would live with us for a long time
I am literary broken in two right now. Not sure she would be willing to drop the price. Many others asked about him on Facebook when they saw his pictures
Then yeah, I would still take him. I agree with CptJack. If she's a top breeder, I wouldn't pass up her puppy!
 

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I have had two completely deaf dogs that started with moderate hearing issues; they did just fine and even so after they became completely deaf; I just added that note to their ID tags. Personally I would take the dog too, agree with Lillith and CptJack.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I have had two completely deaf dogs that started with moderate hearing issues; they did just fine and even so after they became completely deaf; I just added that note to their ID tags. Personally I would take the dog too, agree with Lillith and CptJack.
Thank you. We will get him. We'll bring him home one week from today. He is ...my boy now. No kids here, so he really is my boy. :)
 
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