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Well I think my dog is doomed to a life on a leash. You will never meet a dog more determined to run away. If and when he succeeds at slipping out the front door his gone long gone. I don't know where it comes from this is his Only obedience flaw. On a leash or in a securely fenced yard or field or in the house he has perfect recall. I never let him walk me through a door way and I don't treat him like he is human. I don't understand how a dog that has perfect recall any where act like he has no training as soon as he gets loose. He knows when he is off a leash and he knows when he isn't wearing the E collar and he knows when there is a fence. And he also knows when there is nothing hold him back. I have tried the use of food, collars, toys, treats and love for recall. And no electric boundary fences don't work he also knows if runs fast enough he can run past the shock line. im at my wits end i had this stupid trainer from pet smart tell me that if i just let him off the leash and offered him a treat he would stay. Trapper managed to run out of the store and almost got killed on the high way. I have hired probably ten trainers who failed because there all convinced it me and not the dog and try to use basic methods and most them have lost all control. GRRR Any one have a suggestion that i haven't already tried?:doh::doh::doh::doh:
 

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That is really frustrating and I feel your pain!!! My dogs both wanted to exit any door opened as well, but here are some things to consider (if you haven't already done so, which you probably did lol)

1. Is he neutered? Neutering supposedly helps with the "roaming" issue - particularly if there's a female dog in the neighbourhood in heat ;)
2. Does he get out enough? Do you take him outside to the park, petsmart, walks, etc. enough for him to burn his energy and come home tired? Sometimes if a dog is cooped up even for just a workday, he just wants to run out and go nuts - if you are taking him out consistently, then this probably isn't a solution..
3. Try some training with the door (all the doors he's bolting out of) - I've seen a private lesson done with a trainer, where you basically have the dog on the opposite side of the door as you. Then you open the door a little, if he tries to go out the door, close it again abruptly. He will learn that as soon as he tries to go near an open door, it will shut in his face. Then, open it again, and if he stays, open it wider. He will try to bolt again, then shut the door again (you're pretending that you're entering the door in this scenario, not on the same side of your dog). Then, keep repeating, and he'll learn that anytime the door is open, he must be in a stay position. When he's in a full stay position, and the door is full wide, you can give him permission to cross it, with a command "come" or anything you like to use, and also reward him each time he does a successful stay.

The thing I do with my dog before I let him out the door for walks, going to the park, etc. is make him do a sit-stay at door, and you should not let him exit the house until you are able to leave the door first without him, and he's waiting patiently on the inside of the door, and then you let him come out. It's one thing to just be the first to exit, it's another to fully exit, and make your dog wait in a sit-stay until you give him the release command to cross the doorway.

The other method in alternative to the first one is you open the door, and stand outside (blocking the door way) - of course keep your dog leashed at all times when doing any training at all - then as soon as he looks like he's going to bolt (or becomes still and you know he's thinking of doing it), give a correction and the command to "stay". Treat him if he stays even for a millisecond. keep treating him when he's in the stay position. he will learn it's more worthwhile it sit nicely by the door and receive tons of treats then to bolt out..

I'm not sure if any of these will work, but it's just what I heard a trainer suggest - he's actually quite excellent and has a 4 year degree in Canine Behaviouralism, or smt like that.

Meanwhile, definitely keep a long lead on him at all times just to keep him safe :)
 
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