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I love this dog. Let me say it again because it might not sound like it... i love this dog!
I wouldnt trade him for anything in the world.

I've had Skyler for a couple of years now. And those who have met him told me that there is no way I can explain how Skyler is without someone seeing him for themselves. Skyler is a special dog unlike any other that has crossed my path.

He is a border collie mix. I rescued him from the pound, he was about 2 years old. I wanted a border collie or a high percent border collie mix because I had border collies before and i LOVE how smart they are. how active they are, and how they herd other dogs when they play and give "the eye" :)

Well, Skyler is the laziest dog I have ever seen in my life. He sleeps a lot, or lays on his back with a ball in his mouth with all his legs out into the air. His border collie switch rarely turns on, but sometimes he will herd something.

He always has a look on his face. I cant explain it but its kinda a "duh" sort of look.

I foster dogs and have taught many many dogs sit, down, stay, come, etc etc. However in all this time... Skyler knows sit. and thats all.
Lots of dogs respond to you talking to them, but Skyler usually doesnt respond to any words you say unless its "walk" he can pick that out of a sentence.

Its like Skyler is mostly in his own little world. and he knows nothing unless its right in front of him a few inches from his nose. He can see, unsure how well. and he can hear.

for example....
Skyler is never around kids, we just dont have any around...
we were walking one day at a subdivision and a group of kids (5) ran up and wanted to pet skyler. I told them sure.. Skyler is very laid back.
so all the kids run up to him and start hugging on him (very inappropriate i know!) they talked to him and petting him. and skyler never wagged his tail. Skyler never looked at them. it was as if he didnt even notice them!

Skyler licks everything. the wall, the floor, he will even lick a giant wet spot on furniture. and sometimes he puts so much force behind his tongue that he gets stuck and just sorta sets there with his tongue out.

He is not toy motivated, or treat motivated. He doesnt respond to praise.

My boy is so sweet and such a snuggly dog. He will keep his head in your lap most of the day if you let him. :)

this isnt really a training question...
but have you ever known a dog sorta like how i am trying to describe skyler?
 

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Having had many dogs over the years, I can attest to the fact that they can run the gamut, intelligence-wise, ranging from box-of-hair all the way up to nuclear scientist. Perhaps the reasons for this 'apparent' phenomenon are a topic for different discussion.


While reading your post though, these two parts seemed to jump out at me as the most noteworthy imho, ... BY FAR ....

i love this dog!
I wouldnt trade him for anything in the world.
My boy is so sweet and such a snuggly dog. He will keep his head in your lap most of the day if you let him. :)
Yes, as handlers, a well-trained and social dog is one thing we all should probably aspire to, of course. But at the same time, there are certain occassions where I believe it's important to bear in mind, if you'll pardon the cliche, ...

It is what it is. We are what we are.

:)
 

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I haven't had a dog like this, but I have a cat who is dumber than a box of rocks. Not that I work with my cats the same way I work with my dogs, but I do a wee bit of fooling around with seeing what kind of stuff I can teach them and there is just nothing going on in there with her.

But she's sweet as can be, so who cares?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
oh yeah, i love him i dont care.
he is just the dumbest dog i've ever seen :)
one of the reasons i love him so much.
 

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Please note - this story takes place in the late 70s, or very-early 80s, when I was a kid.

As I've said before, I grew up with hunting hounds. My dad had one old (OLD) beagle who graduated from being a hunting dog, to a training buddy for young pups, to eventually just being a laze around the yard and sleep all the time pet. Who wasn't spayed. Who was lazing around the yard, of a home that had other beagles - where this is going is obvious, right? My dad apparently thought she was too old to go into heat, but - nope.

She had ONE puppy, of that litter. A puppy I named Crystal. That dog was... not right. A lot of what you're saying is stuff I remember. The sort of vacant expression, the licking everything, the absolute lack of ANY sense of danger - I don't mean she was brave, I mean she didn't seem to realize stuff was THERE, and would either stare or walk through it (or off it). She just wasn't right. SWEET AS HECK, but really, really, not okay.
 

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I had a cat like that. Sweetest cat ever, he would sit in your lap all day if he could, but just not right in the head.

Really, humans come in everything from developmentally disabled to Einstein, why not animals? The nicest guy I know can't count past five, but I'd take him over all the smart, a-hole lawyers I work with any day.
 

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Really, humans come in everything from developmentally disabled to Einstein, why not animals?
This is what I was thinking. Dogs are individuals, and most people get so caught up in breed characteristics, they fail to see that.

Case in point: my BC mix went to the vet for a checkup yesterday. From the moment we walked thru the door until the moment we left, she was "on". She's just incredibly busy. She came in with her feet going a million miles an hour (but body not going anywhere because of the leash and slippery floor). The tech had to back away so that she would quit wiggling long enough to get an accurate weight. Then into the exam room. She greeted the tech enthusiastically and counter surfed the exam table several times. When we were left alone in the room, she took the opportunity to sniff the entire room and then stood and stared at the door waiting for someone to walk thru it and tilting her head in confusion at the slightest noise from behind it. The sound of a cat from somewhere in the depths of the office set her off. When the vet came in, she greeted her enthusiastically and started offering tricks for treats. She held still long enough for the eye and ear check, sensing that that was what was needed. She tolerated being poked and then promptly forgot. When it was time to leave, she retrieved her leash, "shopped" the dry food and treats in the waiting room, and barked a farewell to all.

Individual differences in dogs are one good reason for avoiding puppies, IMO. I love a busy, highly intelligent dog, and so that's what I chose for myself. This is easy if you're choosing from a bunch of dogs 6mo or older, but much harder if you're choosing from 8wk old puppies.
 

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My dog has allergies, which exacerbate ear infections. So, my Vet suggested allergy meds and gave me a dosage chart. I bought some generic Claritin and it seems to help. I'm also very careful about washing his ears, when I wash him, b/c it seems like a normal wash disrupts the normal (healthy?) bacterial mix (?). I do try to use ear washes on his ears, and when he has an infection in one ear, I anticipate an infection in the other... for what it's worth...
 

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Trey was very odd. He was a sheltie, passed away 3 years ago. He did eventually lose part of his eyesight but not till he was pretty old.

I can never accurately describe him to anyone but the vets, people that met him, would all comment on hwo weird he was. We called him the robot dog as he never really would show personality. Did not like being petted or held, would rarely look you in the eye. Didn't seem to understand human or dog body language and would almost always react innapropriately. He'd try to play with the other dogs but would scare them and confuse them every time. If we had guests over he would sit in the corner and face the wall. He couldn't go on walks because he would just sit down and not move after we got ut of the driveway. I am pretty sure part of that was just fearfullness. But he was just so stoic you would not see any outward expressions that he was fearful.

He wasn't driveless either. He heel nipped more than our other shelties did and would attack the vacuum. Trey was trainable though but I didn't work much with him. He knew sit, down, stay, shake, and speak.

He could not adapt well either. If he had to wear a cone, he would just get it stuck on the wall and not know how to rescue himself. If you put a blanket or towel on his head, he'd stand there forever until you came and removed it.

He did get better as he got older or maybe I just got more used to him. He did eventually get to where you could hold him and pet him and he wouldn't be stiff as a board. It took until he was about 8 years old to really start feeling like we had much of a bond. After then, he would follow me around 24/7 and just gaze up at me. I loved that dog so much and miss him immensely.
 
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