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Anyone see it, or read it? I saw the movie tonight and thought it was pretty darn good. I love a movie that can be sad, happy, angering and wonderful all at the same time. I didn't read the book yet but I want to read it more now that I saw the movie.

Anyone?
 

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It made me sad that there was ever life and people like that, but great movie.
There still are people like that in the world. It is sad and there simply is no excuse for it. I loved it and I loved it because there was growth in some of the characters and I always love happiness in sad situations. Watching people over come obstacles in their lives is always uplifting. My favorite movies of all times are movies that manage to run me through all different emotions. This isn't my favorite of all times but it did run me through a few different emotions. Did you read the book? If so, did you read it before or after watching the movie?
 

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I read the book a month or so ago and loved it. I usually find a book better than a movie. Marley and me ...the movie was really disappointing compared to the book. Another great book is Little Bee!
 

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Read the book, going to be seeing the movie soon. The book was GREAT!
 

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I read the book a month or so ago and loved it. I usually find a book better than a movie. Marley and me ...the movie was really disappointing compared to the book. Another great book is Little Bee!
I agree with that. I am not sure a movie has ever been better then a good book. Let's face it we add our own imagination to books and it is always better to us then a strangers view of things would be. I find character casting a general disappointment in most cases as well. In the case of "The Help" I didn't read the book first so, I loved the movie. Now I am looking forward to reading the book.
 

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The book is on my "To Read" list and I want to wait to see the movie until after I read it.

Also I think there are a few movie that are better than the books. The Shawshank Redemption and Stardust come to mind immediately.
 

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I loved the book but haven't seen the movie. I try to never watch a movie before I have read the book because the book is always better and I don't want the movie spoiling my imagination while reading. I like to make up my own visuals for characters, not have some actor in my head mucking up the works.....
 

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I have read the book but haven't seen the movie yet. The book was very good and I plan to see the movie at some point. The book handled a very painful time in American history in a moving and realistic way. I live in the south and have all my life. I was born in the midst of the Civil Rights era so luckily have no memory of how bad it was then. Also I am in Virginia and it was a slightly better here than in the deep south. Still I read these things and am so ashamed and appalled at the sheer ugliness and brutality of the racism. While there is still much room for improvement we are still so far from those days.
 

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I loved the book but haven't seen the movie. I try to never watch a movie before I have read the book because the book is always better and I don't want the movie spoiling my imagination while reading. I like to make up my own visuals for characters, not have some actor in my head mucking up the works.....
Me too. What Hollywood thinks is attractive or scary or whatever, I might not see the same. Casting is often a big let down for me. This especially when the author goes into detail and the person cast doesn't come close to it.


I have read the book but haven't seen the movie yet. The book was very good and I plan to see the movie at some point. The book handled a very painful time in American history in a moving and realistic way. I live in the south and have all my life. I was born in the midst of the Civil Rights era so luckily have no memory of how bad it was then. Also I am in Virginia and it was a slightly better here than in the deep south. Still I read these things and am so ashamed and appalled at the sheer ugliness and brutality of the racism. While there is still much room for improvement we are still so far from those days.
I agree.
While watching the movie with friends we were all disgusted with the nastiness against black people. I would like to say that I would never have behaved in that manner but then, If we were raised with it, we might have.
Growing up, I was in a Lily White area and the only black people were usually the Football players so they were often looked at in high regard by many. My parents taught us from early on that the color of ones skin does not define who we are. My grandmother on my fathers side however was NOT a fan of colored people and didn't want us children around them. I was fairly small yet when I realized that her comments were based in fear. She had some very bad experiences with people of color and sadly, no good experiences to balance the scales. My sister who is 20 years older then I am began dating and eventually married a black man. Back then, it wasn't common by any means to have a white woman married to a black man. I found that my parents who had taught us that we were equal did have slight reservations about the marriage. My Father who is older when he had me, had been married before. My sister was a product of his first marriage and his ex wife was also re-married. Jerry (my black brother in law) was never even allowed in my sisters mothers house. My parents welcomed him in but I could feel slight tension the first few times. After that, we all began feeling quite comfortable with him. He wasn't someone I would have chose for a husband but it had nothing to do with the color of his skin. For all the predictions that this marriage would never last and my sister would be sorry, it lasted 30+ years. They remained married until he passed away this last year.

My point was that growing up in an area where there was indeed prejudice of varying degrees, I was still able to judge each person by their character rather then their skin color. I am thankful for my parents who taught me to love rather then hate and to give people a chance. It seems so ridiculous to me that anyone could think that they would get diseased just for using the same facilities as a person with different skin color. It also seems so ridiculous that these small minded fools thought it alright that the people they looked down on were fine to raise their children but not alright to use their same toilet? Sounds more like lack of brain power then anything. I agree that their is a long way to go from an equality standpoint, but we have come a long way and Thank God for that.
 

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My mother-in-law grew up in the south and was cared for by a black nanny whom she loved more than her own mother. The nanny was not allowed to pee in their indoor bathroom. The nanny once told her that her black skin had a zipper and, when she pulled it off, she was just like her underneath. I think it was her best attempt to help a little girl understand prejudice and discrimination for what it is. From then on, she and her sister were forever trying to peek into the out house to see her take her skin off :)

So, my mother-in-law is rabidly anti-prejudicial but, just last week, she commented that the town she lives in (Williamstown, MA) is terrible because there are no black people except the ones at the college that are only paid to go there by scholarship to make fake diversity. I question her assumption that none of the black kids could be smart enough or rich enough or uptight enough to want to go there without being paid by the college.
 

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My mother-in-law grew up in the south and was cared for by a black nanny whom she loved more than her own mother. The nanny was not allowed to pee in their indoor bathroom. The nanny once told her that her black skin had a zipper and, when she pulled it off, she was just like her underneath. I think it was her best attempt to help a little girl understand prejudice and discrimination for what it is. From then on, she and her sister were forever trying to peek into the out house to see her take her skin off :)

So, my mother-in-law is rabidly anti-prejudicial but, just last week, she commented that the town she lives in (Williamstown, MA) is terrible because there are no black people except the ones at the college that are only paid to go there by scholarship to make fake diversity. I question her assumption that none of the black kids could be smart enough or rich enough or uptight enough to want to go there without being paid by the college.
We all have some prejudices regardless of how much we say we believe in equality. The prejudices are unintentional in many cases but they are still there. It might not be a matter of liking or not liking a color of skin, it might simply be a preconceived notion about what those colors mean. In your mother in laws case, she assumes that they are either poor, uneducated or unable to think for themselves in some way. She sounds as though she is still way out in front of the equality cart. Good for her. :)

That was actually one of the things I found the most irritating. You would think that more of the people could think for themselves but so few did. I know that peer pressure is huge but if you were raised by and loved a black nanny, how could you grow up to be such a jerk to colored people? I was so impressed in the movie with the nanny who kept telling the little white girl "You are beautiful, you are kind and you are important" Or something like that, I don't remember exactly the words. I just think it speaks volumes for the character of a person that is valued so little themselves to realize the importance of making others feel valued. I see this every day in the hospital. So many of the Doctors and Nurses have a God complex. Society puts them on pedestals like Gods, Rock stars, pro-athletes so they believe they are above others. (not all of them, obviously) "The Help" isn't just black vs. white, it is educated vs. uneducated, Rich vs. Poor, Lucky vs. unlucky. I have been in charting rooms where health care providers are discussing personal info about patients when housekeeping walks in. The chatter continues because many of these professionals, cannot even see the housekeepers. They behave as though they do not exist at all. They all look down on housekeepers, doctors look down on nurses, surgeons look down on general practitioners etc.. There is pressure to climb the ladder not just because it is something you believe you want to do but because you don't want to be looked down on.

I know that the bible says there will always be war, there will always be rich and poor but I wish it were not so. If everyone were truly equal, I wonder what that would look like? Yup, I have too many thoughts.
 

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I loved Ms. Hilly's mother, and I dearly loved "The Terrible Awful", and I wanted to climb into the screen to make friends with Miss Celia, and mostly through the entire movie I wanted to just stab Ms. Hilly in the neck with a sharp fork.
Rarely do my 14 and 15 yr old girls want to sit and watch a movie with me, but they both watched this with me last weekend and enjoyed it.

Skeeter was great, but I noticed that for all her interest in helping the maids, bc of how she was raised, she doesnt realize that some of the things she does reflect the same attitude she is fighting against. Ex....all the maids are getting on the bus, Skeeter stops Abilene to talk to her (bc SHE wants her to help with HER book) and Abilene misses the bus. Then she has to walk all the way to where she was going.

I am planning to read the book, and I dont think that the characters will be ruined in any way bc I saw the movie first, bc I think the characters in the movie were spot on.
 

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I loved Ms. Hilly's mother, and I dearly loved "The Terrible Awful", and I wanted to climb into the screen to make friends with Miss Celia, and mostly through the entire movie I wanted to just stab Ms. Hilly in the neck with a sharp fork.
Rarely do my 14 and 15 yr old girls want to sit and watch a movie with me, but they both watched this with me last weekend and enjoyed it.

Skeeter was great, but I noticed that for all her interest in helping the maids, bc of how she was raised, she doesnt realize that some of the things she does reflect the same attitude she is fighting against. Ex....all the maids are getting on the bus, Skeeter stops Abilene to talk to her (bc SHE wants her to help with HER book) and Abilene misses the bus. Then she has to walk all the way to where she was going.

I am planning to read the book, and I dont think that the characters will be ruined in any way bc I saw the movie first, bc I think the characters in the movie were spot on.
I agree about Skeeter. At least she offered her a ride but she didn't seem to get that she was putting Abilene in danger by doing so. She was kind but a little clueless it seemed. Either way, a whole lot better then the rest. I think HER mother was an interesting character as well. I think over all a good person but they showed how the pressure forced her to make a terrible mistake and how she tried to fix it the next day and again by sending her son to fix it but it was too late. Sometimes we pay for our mistakes in judgement. Sometimes we don't, we never know which one will cost us, or others.
 
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