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I just came back from a trip to the Emergency Vet and I thought I'd share this with all of you.

When I brought the boys in after a trip outside, Buck started coughing like he had something in his throat, then crying which he never does. I stuck my finger in his mouth and felt around and discovered a splinter. It was imbedded in his palette and I couldn't get it out. It kept sliding back and forth.

Off to the E-vet we went. The doctor had a hard time getting the splinter out even with Buck sedated. When he finally removed it, it was slightly over 1" long.

Now, some of you may have seen videos I've posted of Buck running laps with his sticks. He never chews them, just likes to carry them around. Don't know exactly how this happened but it did.

If this can happen to him, it can happen to any dog especially if they like to chew on the sticks.

New rule in this house: NO MORE STICKS!!!!!

Just a word of caution.
 

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Poor baby! I'm so glad he's ok, though!

My friend was just telling me the other day that she was checking her puppy's mouth because he's teething and she found a stick wedged like a bridge across the top of his mouth :(
 

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That is very scary! and I'm glad that Buck's OK. Yes, I can well imagine you'd be pretty much a mess after going through that with him!
Sticks worry me a lot & my youngest dog is always finding sticks & chewing on them! I hate it, but he has gotten much better about leaving them.
 

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i have had a "NO STICK" policy for my dogs for over about 8 yrs now....i almost lost my Lacey-girl b/c of one.....when she was about 2 1/2 we were playing w/ one and as she went to retrieve it for the umpteenth time, it must have jabbed her in the mouth....heard a slight yelp and checked her when she came back to me but found nothing so figured she was ok....about 2 wks later (we had not played w/ sticks in that whole time) she was having a hard time breathing and swallowing and was kinda gagging at times and didn't want to play (this was on a Sunday)....i called my vet and they recommended giving her and aspirin to take any swelling down and if she wasn't better by a.m. to bring her in.....i was up w/ her most the night keeping her breathing by repositioning her when she got in bad positions and had her in the vet at 8 a.m. the next morning....she had a hole in the soft part of the roof of her mouth, about an inch across, that was massively infected.....1 hr of surgery later and she was "better".....if i had waited even till that afternoon, she would have been gone.....(we didn't have an E-vet here at that time, they came about a yr or 2 later)....

NO MORE STICKS....
 

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I'm glad your pooch is doing better now!

Thanks for the warning. Hunter sometimes fetches sticks and I always made sure they were big enough that he couldn't swallow it and get it logged in his throat, but I never thought of splinters. New rule: no sticks. Tennis balls: yes.
 

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I'm so glad your pup is ok. I cringe when I see dogs chewing on sticks. They can get lodged in their mouths, throats, stomach, intestines, etc. -- all the way down. Splinters from sticks killed one of my childhood dogs. So we don't allow Poca to chew any kind of wood.

My friend was just telling me the other day that she was checking her puppy's mouth because he's teething and she found a stick wedged like a bridge across the top of his mouth :(
This happened to our dog at the beach. One minute she was fine and the next she had snatched a stick off the beach, bitten down on it and a piece got wedged between her upper teeth. I had a devil of a time getting it out. She was whining horribly and so was I since I had to get past her grinding teeth to get the piece out. Ouch! We were inches from going to the emergency room.

Hunter sometimes fetches sticks and I always made sure they were big enough that he couldn't swallow it and get it logged in his throat, but I never thought of splinters. New rule: no sticks. Tennis balls: yes.

I hate to break this to you about tennis balls....http://www.avds-online.org/info/wornteeth.html
 

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I hate to break this to you about tennis balls....http://www.avds-online.org/info/wornteeth.html
I can't imagine tennis ball fetch games causing the same amount of wear as daily chewing would, though. Unless the dog is really gnashing on the ball as it runs back and forth - but even then, that would only be seconds of chewing as opposed to possible hours if the ball is available at all times.

Then again, I'm not overly experienced with tennis balls. Dakota never really took to them.

As for the sticks, yeah I don't fetch with them either. I've seen or heard too many stories about sticks lodged in throats, splinters, stabbings, etc. to really be comfortable throwing one around. Dakota does like to carry sticks though. We have really smooth driftwood branches on the banks of a river we frequent and she loves to just like...hold them. No chewing or nibbling, she just keeps it in her mouth :rolleyes:
 

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I'm glad he's ok. My sister's stock dog had a stick go through his throat one time. Luckily it missed anything vital but that was the last time Brewski ever was permitted to play stick. It just was not worth the risk. I just wish Hollywood would stop showing dogs happily playing with sticks.
 

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Thanks everyone. Buck is fine this morning, although he's still feeling some of the effects of the Ace.

I'm now tasked with finding him a replacement 'trophy' for his lap running.

Any suggestions? I have some ideas, but I'd like to hear what others come up with as well.
 

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Way to go Buck it's hard to conquer Murphy's Law. I like this thread as it's a nice wake-up call to newbies. It's like that old TV show Lost In Space where the robot would yell "Danger Will Robinson, Danger" Good job Renoman it's nice to have an E-Vet handy, we don't have one in our area.
 

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Glad He's okay, Reno--I was worried about pretty boy!
Otis likes to carry sticks..err...logs around a little bit, but he really likes to carry around about a 3 foot piece of plastic PVC pipe --maybe Buck would take to a piece of that?? It's like a huge Nylabone haha --You could Paint it brown and spray it with pine scent--he'll never know the difference ;)
 

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I'm so glad your pup is ok. I cringe when I see dogs chewing on sticks. They can get lodged in their mouths, throats, stomach, intestines, etc. -- all the way down. Splinters from sticks killed one of my childhood dogs. So we don't allow Poca to chew any kind of wood.



This happened to our dog at the beach. One minute she was fine and the next she had snatched a stick off the beach, bitten down on it and a piece got wedged between her upper teeth. I had a devil of a time getting it out. She was whining horribly and so was I since I had to get past her grinding teeth to get the piece out. Ouch! We were inches from going to the emergency room.




I hate to break this to you about tennis balls....http://www.avds-online.org/info/wornteeth.html
Lol, well there will always be SOMETHING about everything a dog can get in it's mouth. But, as Dakota said, I think with the limited amount of time it's in the mouth and such, Hunter should be fine with his tennis balls. :D
 

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So scary!! Our dogs LOVE sticks and it's hard to keep them from finding them and running around with them. Even worse, they adore pine cones too... and yes, they try to eat them if I don't take them away immediately... I can only imagine the damage a piece of pine cone could do!! :(
 

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The determine the danger of things like sticks you have to consider the relative danger. The number of injuries caused by sticks relative to the number of instances of dogs playing with sticks.

By this measure the danger of playing with sticks is statistically insignificant.
 

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The determine the danger of things like sticks you have to consider the relative danger. The number of injuries caused by sticks relative to the number of instances of dogs playing with sticks.

By this measure the danger of playing with sticks is statistically insignificant.
There's really no way to measure that for either side...unless you have some kind of stick injury survey.

Though even if it is insignificant, given how serious the injuries can be...it's not really worth the risk, IMO. There are plenty of alternative toys that don't pose any risk of stabbing your dog in the mouth.
 
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