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Discussion Starter #1
My 3 yr. old beagle mix (female) has had some greeting issues for the last three days (she has been outside in her pin). Every time a person would walk up to look at stuff or if just passing by she goes nuts. Barking, jumping and howling. I have tried everything including muzzle (this has worked in the past), mixing vinegar and water and spraying it around her and doing what works inside; just telling her the quit down. I do not know if it is because she fears of something happening me or if its just that she wants all the attention.
 

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You're making things much worse by punishing her. The problem is this...she has not been taught how to meet and greet people. Most people have their dogs sit politely for petting and the greeting...basically, laying down the rules of how the dog is supposed to say Hi to people. If you let the dog make up their own rules, they're not really going to know how to act.

And, yes, part of this is for the attention as dogs are highly social but, that doesn't always mean they are well mannered or have all the good social graces...that's where your training comes in.
 

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I need some clarification here.
How much time does she spend out in her pen?
How much exercise/one on one training time and fun does she get with you each day?
Does she sleep in the pen as well?
Does the barking only happen when she is in the pen?

More info is needed..and I agree with Tooney...punishing the barking without working out WHY she is barking (fear, excitement, barrier frustration, alarm barking etc) is not going to solve your problems.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
She is only out in the pin when I do yard work or when bbqing. The time out in the pin has increased due to the weather. I play with her alot inside. Her barking is not just in the pin..she will even try to look outside through a window just to try and find something to bark at. For toys she has pile of them and she just picks and plays.
 

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Okay.
One, she's a beagle mix...hounds are "announcers"..LOOK a dog! LOOK a person! LOOK a car! LOL.
I was recently working with a beagle who howls incessantly when someone is at the door. I used a clicker. The dog was allowed ONE bark/howl and then was clicked and rewarded (interrupting the bark and then rewarded..hard to bark when you are eating). Once the one bark, stop and look at me (waiting for the click/treat) was happening I started to delay the click..one second at a time. This is so the click and reward is now happening for the QUIET,not the initial bark itself. With time, the bark became a sort of permanent "one bark" signal. Then I added the "quiet" cue and click/treated. The idea is that (with practice and consistency on behalf of the owner) the dog will learn to alert them someone is at the door with one bark and then STOP.
It takes some time, but is much nicer than punishment and really reinforces the quiet cue..eventually you can preempt the bark completely (if you see the trigger coming) and have a dog that will not bark all the time.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I will give it a try. I still have the clicker that past trainer gave us to use. But, would you prefer one of the older ones or a newer one..there is a pet store a few blocks from here if you think the newer ones are better.
 

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Okay.
One, she's a beagle mix...hounds are "announcers"..LOOK a dog! LOOK a person! LOOK a car! LOL.
I was recently working with a beagle who howls incessantly when someone is at the door. I used a clicker. The dog was allowed ONE bark/howl and then was clicked and rewarded (interrupting the bark and then rewarded..hard to bark when you are eating). Once the one bark, stop and look at me (waiting for the click/treat) was happening I started to delay the click..one second at a time. This is so the click and reward is now happening for the QUIET,not the initial bark itself. With time, the bark became a sort of permanent "one bark" signal. Then I added the "quiet" cue and click/treated. The idea is that (with practice and consistency on behalf of the owner) the dog will learn to alert them someone is at the door with one bark and then STOP.
It takes some time, but is much nicer than punishment and really reinforces the quiet cue..eventually you can preempt the bark completely (if you see the trigger coming) and have a dog that will not bark all the time.
I might try this with my hound, but I'm skeptical. I have tried over and over and over to teach him and in 4 months have not taught him a single thing. He's either stubborn and independent or just isn't motivated. He sees the treat though and goes nuts.
 

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LOL..yeah hounds are a lot of work. Mine is a foxhound mix so I "get it"..but food really is your friend here.
It takes practice and timing, a hungry dog and a zillion little tiny pieces of REALLY stinky treats.

And any clicker will do. I like the "button" type rather than the "box type" clickers just because I find it easier to click..I always get my fingers stuck in the box.
 
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