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We brought Minnie the mini-schnauzer home 5 weeks ago, so she is now about 11wks old. She is housetrained. Learned that really quick. I think she is a smart dog, however...

1- Biting/nipping- really awful. Bites at the back of your heels as you walk by, and jumps over any toy to latch onto your hand/wrist/arm. Saw the one video with the guy training with a handful of treats and saying "Off" that seems to (maybe?) be helping. Unfortunately I seem to be the only one working with her. DH just expects her to immediately do what he says?! He does not even try to work with her.

2- Sadly the 4yr old and to a lesser extent the 6yr old are just too afraid of the biting to want to interact with Minnie. The 6yr old is getting better, but still has her moments. The 4yr old, has problems. The dog I think has learned that 4yo needs chasing to the couch anytime she comes to the room. Early on, the kids started running and jumping on the couch in order to get away from dog.

How do I get dog to stop chasing 4yr old? 4yr old gets so worked up she can't quit crying and can't understand that what she is doing is making biting worse. I have tried to get her to have a treat ready to give to dog when walking into kitchen but she just refuses to move unless I pick dog up and hold her.

My last mini-schnauzer died 3 years ago. I have missed her terribly. Frankly I don't remember her being in a biting puppy stage, but then again I was a single gal and didn't run screaming across the room to jump on the couch.

Sorry this is so long for a first post, I am desperate....
 

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Read the sticky The Bite Stops Here.
If I read that right you got the pup at 6wks old? That's two weeks of practicing bite inhibition with mom and litter mates that the puppy missed out on. In many places, it's illegal to sell a puppy before eight weeks of age. These laws are in place for a reason.

If the four year old can't understand that she needs to hold still, then the puppy shouldn't be loose around her.
Yes, you need to work on impulse control with the puppy but she is still just a puppy. This does sound like normal puppy behavior to me.
Maybe you can practice rewarding calm behavior from the puppy on-leash while the kids run around in the yard. Hopefully, one of the parents here will chime in.

Start looking for puppy classes now. Some trainers are nice enough to allow children to participate with THEIR dog only too. But your DH should definitely be there.
 

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I appreciate your input and will again read The Bite Stops Here. I keep telling DH she is acting like a normal puppy. He is not much help with this. We will look for puppy classes. In the meantime- anyone with kids- how can I help 4yr old and dog to interact better?
 

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- Keep pup on a leash. Tethered to you when the 4 y/o is around so the pup can't chase her.
- Reward calm behavior
- Slowly reintroduce the 4 y/o and the pup. Reward both for calm, quiet behavior. You may have to "train" the children as well as the dog. They need to understand that running and screaming only serves to make it worse not better. Perhaps have them near each other where they cannot reach other. Slowly move closer as each is calm.

A high pitched running child only serves to fuel the pup's prey drive (the dog is a terrier). Getting the 4 y/o to act calm and quiet around the pup will help.
Remember that the dog is just a puppy - it is going to act like a puppy. Also the pup doesn't speak english and isn't a mind reader - if you haven't trained a word to mean anything than the pup will not know what it means no matter how many times you say it. This also means you cannot expect behaviors you haven't trained.

Discourage any rough play with the pup. With as young as the pup is - it won't be able to comprehend to only play rough with one person and may try with the children - only fueling their fears.

As much as they are able/it is possible involve the children in the training. Explain the pup is just a baby and doesn't know any better and you must all work together to teach the puppy.

A thought to help with the running and screaming - perhaps sitting stationary chairs (in the case the pup escapes off the leash) around the area and telling them if the puppy begins to play rough/chase to calmly climb into one of the chairs. If the chairs are all around there will be less need to run and therefore less need to scream and fuel the pup's prey drive.

Patience - one of the biggest keys to dog training.
 

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First of all, I’m all for treat based training and that’s how I trained Josie. On the other hand, there were a few behaviors that I considered unacceptable and she was “punished” for those. We used the bite stops here method to teach bite inhibition and it really made a difference in her interactions with us as well as with my cats.

My bf has a teenage son that comes over on the weekend and Josie would get so excited to see him that she went out of control licking and biting him everywhere. Most of the time she didn’t bite to hard but once in a while I would hear him say no bite and she wouldn’t slow down at all. That’s when she got the water bottle which she hates. As soon as I sprayed her, she stopped what she was doing and turned around to me. I only had to do this a couple of times before she listened when he said no. Same went for ankle biting. I walked around with a water bottle and said no, if she didn’t listen, she was sprayed. The key is to use it sparingly and only when your serious. Everything else we tried like the noise and stuff didn’t faze her because she figured out real quick that the noise was the extent of the punishment. Once she got around 4 months old, even no stopped working for a couple of weeks until we followed it up with the bottle. Now she listens, most of the time 
 

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THANK YOU!!! Thank you both for your great advice! I will definitely work on re-introducing the 4yr old and dog. The kitchen chairs scattered around could really be helpful.
LenaCara- when you say water bottle, do you mean a squirt bottle?

Thank you again!
 

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When we first brought home our first dog, she was a little puppy. She did well with my older three kids, but not the littlest one. Him, she was get all over, not listen to him, nip and bite at him. After a couple weeks, we could see this pattern -- he'd walk in the room, the puppy would run to him, nip/bite, he would scream, start flapping his arms and run like crazy. I think from her perspective, she was thinking, "ok, heres that kid, I bite him, then we all play this great game!awesome!" lol.
So to begin with, any time she bit him, I would grab her up and immediately put her in the kitchen for a minute, and shut the door. Also, I really worked with my son to teach him to turn away from her, either stand still or walk slowly away from her, not the whole running, screaming deal. After awhile of this, she started to realize there was no more game after biting, everyone ignored her, that was no fun, and after about a month of persistence, she stopped.

good luck, dont give up. it can just take time to teach both the pup and the child how to react to each other.
 

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I'd NOT recommend using the spray bottle. Yes, it can work. But, if the spray of water scares the dog, it can cause the puppy to have issues with bathing and water in general. Plus, it's an aversive, which I don't recommend using on a puppy this young. The puppy is 11 weeks old!

So, I'd say pretty much the same thing as Charis.

Here's what we did for biting/nipping:
- puppy bites, we say ouch loudly, but not angrily.
- puppy will probably bite again, immediately, as it's natural to the puppy.
- say ouch again, and this time, leave the room for 20-30 seconds. Any longer than that and the puppy forgets why you left, so the connection is lost.
[If the whole family is in the room, it really doesn't do any good for just the one person that got nipped to leave the room. The point is, when they nip/bite, human contact ends. So, in this case, you might put the PUPPY in another puppy safe room for 20-30 seconds.]
- repeat, repeat, repeat.

Biting is the way puppies play. It's the same as how babies and toddlers put everything in their mouthes. So, you're actually trying to TEACH her, not just STOP her.
It takes time, patience, and most of all, consistency. Every one has to be on the same page, and do the same exact thing every time she bites/nips. For our Harper, it took 4 weeks. For Abby, 2 weeks, for Oliver, about 6 weeks.

Since your puppy missed out on the time mama and siblings would have starting teaching him about bite inhibition, it might take longer.

As for your daugher, it's been said before, but a screaming child, running quickly is just seen as prey or a fun thing to chase. I know, it's hard, she's a child, but, work on this from two different angles, teaching the puppy, and teaching her how to act around the puppy.

And, tethering the puppy to you with a leash is a great idea. That way, he can't chase after your daughter when she enters the room. You could also put an ex-pen in the corner of the room so the puppy has a play area, but can't chase your daugher.

Good luck!!!
 
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