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Can I teach my puppy not to grab and chew on objects that don't belong to her? Sasha has a thing for clothing, dish cloths, towels, etc. If I catch her with the item and say "leave it," she'll drop it immediately. The problem is if I don't see her with it. I can turn my eyes for a minute and discover she's quietly grabbed the dish cloth and is chewing it. She has lots of toys, some in each room including soft ones, and she doesn't have free run of the house. She's either in her puppy pen or in the room I am in, the kitchen or living room.
 

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Puppies demand supervision like that unfortunately. The more you stay on top of it, the less chance she has to grab something and the behavior will eventually stop. It's exhausting but well worth it! It's good to crate, puppy pen, or leash her in a certain spot when you can't be watching- even if it's only 10 minutes for a shower or 5 minutes to wash some dishes. You can also try rotating her toys. Instead of having them all out, give her only 2 or 3 different toys each day. Pick them up at the end of the day. Next day, offer 2 or 3 different ones. Build the value of those toys as much as you can by playing with her with them and making them super exciting toys. When her attention is on a toy, it's not on a forbidden object. It sounds like you're doing a great job, as she will drop the objects for you and you're doing your best to supervise and contain her so she doesn't roam. Puppies are so darn sneaky.
 

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Sibe gave some good advice that I agree with. Puppies are like children and they will often grab things they're not supposed to have. What you're doing is good. 'Leave it' a fanntasstticcc command. It's my favorite xD Just keep on top of her. When you catch her with things she's not supposed to have, just consistently take them from her, give her a firm 'no'. Like Sibe said, make the toys more interesting, basically show her that toys are more fun than the things she's not allowed to omnom on.

My Sibe is 5 and still had a problem with grabbing things that aren't hers. She's a little brat, and will often take toys from the other dogs and move them to a place where they can't reach. My pit mix, who is 4, will grab my plushies and try to eat them to the best of his ability. I, unfortunately, did not keep onto them as babies. It's biting me in the rear now.
 

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Puppies demand supervision like that unfortunately. The more you stay on top of it, the less chance she has to grab something and the behavior will eventually stop. It's exhausting but well worth it! It's good to crate, puppy pen, or leash her in a certain spot when you can't be watching- even if it's only 10 minutes for a shower or 5 minutes to wash some dishes. You can also try rotating her toys. Instead of having them all out, give her only 2 or 3 different toys each day. Pick them up at the end of the day. Next day, offer 2 or 3 different ones. Build the value of those toys as much as you can by playing with her with them and making them super exciting toys. When her attention is on a toy, it's not on a forbidden object. It sounds like you're doing a great job, as she will drop the objects for you and you're doing your best to supervise and contain her so she doesn't roam. Puppies are so darn sneaky.
Sibe gave you very good advice!
I really like the part that is bolded. My mother was notorious for buying TONS of toys for her poodle, then getting upset (and buying more toys) because he didn't play with any of them. At one of our get togethers, my boyfriend started playing fetch and seek with our older GSD and all of a sudden, poodle was playing too! He just had to be shown that the toys were of value and something that he could get praise and attention from. Now he is a total goof with that particular toy and will sometimes even toss other toys around too.

Another thing you can do, is simply management. Try to keep all of these desired objects out of her reach. This may involve changing some habits. When we first got our little one, I had to start storing the garbage bin outside and temporarily keep all of our electronics unplugged, with the cords out of reach unless they were being used at that instant. It was tedious, but only temporary. Managment, coupled with redirecting, supervision and training worked well for me. Now that he is a bit older, things are much more relaxed.
 

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Always substitute something they CAN chew on, for the forbidden item. Teach not just what you don't want them to do, but teach them what to do.
 
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