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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all, I want to start teaching Iggy my 5 month old pit commands and hoping u guys can tell me what works for your dogs best.

He knows:
1.) No lol
2.) Get off, Go,with a arm point combo ;) ( for the bed )
3.) Sit ( usually takes him 5 times or so to actually sit though)
4.) Get out (of the tub-he likes to jump in and search for water droplets :D and bathroom)


Want to teach him:
1.) QUIET! he barks at anything. Should I also teach speak with this, maybe it'll make it easier?
2.) Go to your cage/ bed. We don't know which one to use with this because Blanco ( 2yr old pit/chow) knows go to your cage, he will stop from ANYTHING and do this it's so cute! So should we teach Iggy go to your cage since when we say it Blanco will go to his cage even if we aren't talking to him, and model the behavior?
3.) Work on sit
4.) Wait. Mostly for his food because he jumps in the air about 20 feet like tigger from winnie the pooh. I have to stop and yell at him and say sit because he's knocking into my arm while I'm trying to pour the food. I guess a combo of sit and wait would be good.
5.) Stay ( or should I just use wait for this? )
6.) Come


If u can mention some signals with the command that would be good. Thanks :D
 

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I suggest you check out the free training information available at http://www.clickertraining.com and http://www.dogstardaily.com

I would try to get No out of your vocabulary as it really means nothing. Instead of telling your dog No and focusing on what you don't want your dog to do, focus on training your dog what you want him to do and tell him to do that instead.

If you have to repeat your cues, your dog does not really know them. You want your cue to be "Sit," not "Sit, sit, SIT, siiit, Sit." Once your dog is reliably plopping onto his butt after the first sit in boring, familiar settings such as inside your home, you need to take the time to generalize the behaviors gradually by taking the show on the road and adding more distractions, distance and duration slowly so your dog can be successful. Check out http://www.dragonflyllama.com

I prefer not to teach a "stay" cue as I teach my sit, down and stand cues to mean remain in that position until you are released. As for a dog getting all bouncy for food or walkies, etc., I play impulse control games such as the one I posted that can be found as a sticky here on the Training Forum. I prefer to train each of my dogs individually.
 

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I really have to disagree with taking no out of your vocabulary because really, to a dog everything means nothing until you train them to know what it means. And of course, every dog needs to be taught what is right and wrong so you dont end up with a dog who does as he pleases.

For the quiet command, I don't think teaching speak is neccesary, but try to catch him while he's barking and then say Quiet! in a sharp tone. Its not to scold him for it, but to make him stop making the noise right away and focus on you. Always have a treat at the ready for when he stops of course.

The stay command is easy to do; just repeat stay when he is sitting or whatever with your hand in front of his face. When he gets up calmly, without saying anything put him EXACTLY back where he was and repeat the command. For the first few times make sure you don't make him stay for too long; probably only about 7 seconds or so. When he advances on this command of course you can do it for longer.

I hope you find his useful! Good Luck!:)
 

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Actually saying No to the dog in many instances actually reinforces the bad behavior... Take jumping for example, you need to straight up ignore it and pretend the dog doesn't exist. Saying NO or Get Off to the dog only encourages him to continue the behavior. The dog is simply looking for your attention, and you are giving it to him by saying "no".

The same applies in other instances. If he is chewing slippers and you say "no", he learns "OK, I gotz 2 hyde whenz Iz eatz slipperz", not "Iz shouldn'tz eat those sipperz cause they's Iz not chewz toyz"


The dog doesn't know what the heck no means....
 

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I really have to disagree with taking no out of your vocabulary because really, to a dog everything means nothing until you train them to know what it means. And of course, every dog needs to be taught what is right and wrong so you dont end up with a dog who does as he pleases.
Please, teach me what No means. This should be easy since we speak a common language, unlike people and dogs. First, think of all of the many reasons you might say No to your dog. With that in mind, does No mean: Stop? Don't do that? Leave that alone? Don't leave that alone? Go to you? Don't go to you? Stay? Don't stay? Get up there? Don't get up there? Go? Don't go? Try again? End of story?

I want all of my cues to have a very specific meaning known to myself and trained to be known by my dogs. Most people who use No fail to train it to have a specific meaning, therefore making it ineffective in telling their dogs what to do. Instead of saying No, I prefer to tell my dogs to Reorient to me (Name of dog), Come, Front, Sit, Down, Stand, Hup, Leave it, Fetch, Go, Quiet, Kennel, Load up, Get it, Tug, Break, etc. and they will know exactly what I mean and how to perform. If they don't perform when cued I can then address the situation, but with more training or management. Saying No would tell them nothing about what I want them to be doing unless it is conditioned as a No Reward Marker (meaning Wrong, or Try again), but even then it would not function as you are suggesting; by keeping the dog from running amok, since the next things they try to do could be just as undesirable as what they were told No for.
 

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When i say that you should say no to your dog, i dont mean just saying no in a normal tone. I mean using a verbal correction. And for it to be effective you have to say it right, not just a plain and simple no, or stop. That isn't effective. When you correct it needs to be something short, sharp and punchy, so that it doesn't matter what word you said, just how you said it so that the dog knows that it is wrong.

By giving a dog another command when it is doing something that you want it to stop doing, how is this telling the dog that it is not okay?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Ok ok buttt in mine and Iggy's defence I say no when he's eating his shit or the garbage and he stops what he's doing and does his "I'm sorry" whine.If he is jumping for food I try to ignore him, but sometimes u can't then I tell him to sit not no. So wut do u say to the dog when he's eatin ur gucci loafers? I don't get it. I think the not sayin no is a bunch of crap. Plenty of people say a sharp shhh or ehhh-ehhh wut does THAT mean to the dog? SAME as no, its just that we know what no is and means.When u tell ur dog ehhhhh ur just saying it for yourself... no sprinkled with glitter. Can I get some suggestions on the other commands instead of the crippeling effects of the word nooooo (gasps!)
 

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I personally find free shaping to be the easiest form of training. It's all there, in most cases, the dog naturally does the behaviors we want to teach them, it's simply a matter of adding a cue so they do it when it is asked of them.
If the dog is already sitting, say "sit". If the dog is already laying down, say "down". You can try luring them into position and adding the cues as well, or catching them AS they are doing the desired behavior, but eventually they'll catch on to what you want them to do.

As far as the come command goes, always reward, and never punish when they come. There's a lot that can "ruin" this command, so be careful with it. If you are upset with him, don't tell it to "come" and then be angry with him (even so much as a raised/harsh voice). Regardless of what the dog did before hand, praise him for coming to you when asked, or he likely won't want to come next time around. Even when say for instance you are at a dog park, and you say "come" when it's time to go. Being taken out of the dog park to them is a punishment for coming when called.

Anyway, simply put, always, ALWAYS reward your dog for coming when called. High value treats are usually the best way to get started so the dog wants to come.
 

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When i say that you should say no to your dog, i dont mean just saying no in a normal tone. I mean using a verbal correction. And for it to be effective you have to say it right, not just a plain and simple no, or stop. That isn't effective. When you correct it needs to be something short, sharp and punchy, so that it doesn't matter what word you said, just how you said it so that the dog knows that it is wrong.

By giving a dog another command when it is doing something that you want it to stop doing, how is this telling the dog that it is not okay?
Like I said. Say no when the dog it eating your gucci loafers, and he'll learn to steal the loafers and hide behind the couch next time and eat them. It is much better to issue a command to them having nothing to do with the behavior you don't want.

To answer laggo, it is quite an easy idea to understand: rewarded behaviors are perpetuated and unrewarded behaviors extinguish over time.

Or, you can put things like chewing on loafers "on cue" then never give the command. So say the dog loves chewing loafers. Train him to only chew loafers when you tell him to. Then, stop telling to forever, and he won't do it again.
 

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1. Quiet is more likely to be successful if you teach it in unison with speak. First, treat him when he barks and associate the action with the word "speak". Then, tell him to speak, and when he stops, give the command "quiet" and treat him. 3 seconds it generally the amount of time you should wait before treating him for quiet, so he knows it's for the silence, not the bark.

2. Start off by treating him every time he shows interest in his crate. If he sniffs it, treat him. He will eventually put a paw in, treat him. He will then go in (and I think he already goes in there, correct?), treat him. Once he is going into the crate to get the treats, start giving the command "go to bed/go to your cage" (whichever you prefer) and treat him when he goes inside or already is.

3. For sit, hold a treat in your hand and move it toward him, above his head, and backwards. If he backs up, start over. Eventually, if you are holding the treat low enough to his face, he will sit. As soon as his butt touches the ground, give him the treat and use the word "sit". Repeat, repeat, repeat. Once he knows it, have him sit BEFORE you begin getting his food ready. If he jumps up, make him sit again. He does not get his food until he is sitting calmly and you RELEASE him from sit. If you put the food down and he jumps up to get it, pick it up before he gets to it. Make him sit, repeat. He will eventually remain in sit for his food.

4.To teach wait, put him into a sit (he can be standing, but I've found it more beneficial to have them sit) and put your hand up in front of him. Give the command "wait". Begin to back away from him. If he gets up, move forward with your hand out and calmly restate the command. Remember, no fast/emotional movements as it will excite him. He will eventually understand that if he remains in the same place, you will release him and he gets what he wants. When you want to release him, say "okay" or some other word and encourage him to move.

5. Stay is very similar to wait, only they should be in a sit/down position and NOT stand. It's taught pretty much the same way as wait.

6. To do come, have Iggy on a leash. Have your boyfriend lead him by his collar to the other end of the room with you holding the opposite end of the leash. Call Iggy's name, and when he looks at you, immediately give the command "Come!". Hold the leash and begin to back up to entice him to come to you. Your boyfriend should release him just as you say "come". If Iggy does not immediately run to you, start to reel him in with the leash. Treat him when he reaches you.

Annnd, that's all, I think. Remember to repeat all of this DAILY. Preferably several short sessions a day.
 

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"Stay is very similar to wait, only they should be in a sit/down position and NOT stand. It's taught pretty much the same way as wait."


There are stand/stays in Obedience and Rally O. It's also handy to have in Agility for the start line. Stacked dogs in conformation are standing and staying in position. Of course stand/stays can also be useful outside of the showring, too. There is no rule that says you can't teach your dog to stay or wait in any position they can maintain, even standing and staying with such extreme criteria as this: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WT6M01gVrWM&feature=related
 

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Discussion Starter #12
"Like I said. Say no when the dog it eating your gucci loafers, and he'll learn to steal the loafers and hide behind the couch next time and eat them. It is much better to issue a command to them having nothing to do with the behavior you don't want.

To answer laggo, it is quite an easy idea to understand: rewarded behaviors are perpetuated and unrewarded behaviors extinguish over time.

Or, you can put things like chewing on loafers "on cue" then never give the command. So say the dog loves chewing loafers. Train him to only chew loafers when you tell him to. Then, stop telling to forever, and he won't do it again."

lol I'm dunno about that, but I think if he REALLY wants my shoes or garbage he will go hide and do it, but I know he doesn't. Iggy isn't the type of dog that chews on shoes or really wants the garbage he would rather a bully stickor be on my lap. He's just doing it cause he doesn't know it's wrong basically just trying it out, but I want to let him know it's not good. I don't think theres anyother way to let him know that.

1. Quiet is more likely to be successful if you teach it in unison with speak. First, treat him when he barks and associate the action with the word "speak". Then, tell him to speak, and when he stops, give the command "quiet" and treat him. 3 seconds it generally the amount of time you should wait before treating him for quiet, so he knows it's for the silence, not the bark.


That's a good idea because he can barely be distracted when he's barking for me to say quiet, I usually have to tap him ( which sometimes doesn't even work) or grab him to get his attention just to say quiet.

2. Start off by treating him every time he shows interest in his crate. If he sniffs it, treat him. He will eventually put a paw in, treat him. He will then go in (and I think he already goes in there, correct?), treat him. Once he is going into the crate to get the treats, start giving the command "go to bed/go to your cage" (whichever you prefer) and treat him when he goes inside or already is.

Today we we're practing this, he did good! =) I kinda skipped the first part and said go to your cage, he went in and as soon as he did I treated him. I kinda did this in unison w/ wait and come I think it was a little much for him to remember at the same time so I'll prob do it seperately next time, but it went together so well lol. So I then made him stay in his cage with the door open. When he tried to come out I put my arm and said wait, moved back a bit, said wait, then gave him the treat. Then I moved back again and said wait. Then I waited a few seconds and said come and treated him. Did this a bunch of times, he did good though, I got pretty far back

3. For sit, hold a treat in your hand and move it toward him, above his head, and backwards. If he backs up, start over. Eventually, if you are holding the treat low enough to his face, he will sit. As soon as his butt touches the ground, give him the treat and use the word "sit". Repeat, repeat, repeat. Once he knows it, have him sit BEFORE you begin getting his food ready. If he jumps up, make him sit again. He does not get his food until he is sitting calmly and you RELEASE him from sit. If you put the food down and he jumps up to get it, pick it up before he gets to it. Make him sit, repeat. He will eventually remain in sit for his food.

I don't know if he doesn't get this or just doesn't want to do it sometimes. Sometimes I say sit and he goes right down. Other times I have to say it a million times and he stares at me like he has no clue. We practiced this too.

4.To teach wait, put him into a sit (he can be standing, but I've found it more beneficial to have them sit) and put your hand up in front of him. Give the command "wait". Begin to back away from him. If he gets up, move forward with your hand out and calmly restate the command. Remember, no fast/emotional movements as it will excite him. He will eventually understand that if he remains in the same place, you will release him and he gets what he wants. When you want to release him, say "okay" or some other word and encourage him to move.

I did this with a treat too. I made him sit there as I brought the treat closer, he would reach to get it and I would say wait and push his face back with his nose very lightly to reg position. Then i would do this over and over until the treat was very close to him and then I finally gave it to him.

Thanks so much =) very helpful!



Ya british that's true I have to make sure I don't slip up. He's good with come in the house...with no distractions of course =) I'm going to try to start doing it at the park. We we're at the park the other day and there was a remote control race car. It went by and we let him chased it because I wanted to see if he would come if I called, he usually thinks he's on a string he can never go past about 5 feet from us, Blanco will be running with a stick about 20ft ahead and Iggy will have to stop at his 5 ft mark. I had to call him a few times, but he came. But that was just a test I'm going to keep practicing this with less extreme distractions.
 

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Ok ok buttt in mine and Iggy's defence I say no when he's eating his shit or the garbage and he stops what he's doing and does his "I'm sorry" whine.If he is jumping for food I try to ignore him, but sometimes u can't then I tell him to sit not no. So wut do u say to the dog when he's eatin ur gucci loafers? I don't get it. I think the not sayin no is a bunch of crap. Plenty of people say a sharp shhh or ehhh-ehhh wut does THAT mean to the dog? SAME as no, its just that we know what no is and means.When u tell ur dog ehhhhh ur just saying it for yourself... no sprinkled with glitter. Can I get some suggestions on the other commands instead of the crippeling effects of the word nooooo (gasps!)
Why not train an incompatible behaviour and cue that behaviour instead? Say, in the unlikely chance that I come home and Spunky is eating the garbage, I would ask her to come. She can't come to me and eat the garbage at the same time; so she comes to me, and the garbage eating stops. I walk into the kitchen and Honey has her paws up on the counter. I go over and ask for a sit. She sits. The counter-surfing stops.

Likewise, I catch my dog eating my Gucci loafers (not that I own any). I ask for a "give it" -- she gives me the loafer, and the loafer-eating stops.

1.) QUIET! he barks at anything. Should I also teach speak with this, maybe it'll make it easier?
You can teach both together. Start by waiting for him to bark at something. When he barks, wait for him to be quiet. The minute he is quiet, click and treat. Do not say "quiet" yet. Just click and treat when he stops barking. Eventually he will come to expect a reward for being quiet -- you will recognise this point when he barks, keeps quiet and then looks at you. This is when you can add the "quiet" cue.

2.) Go to your cage/ bed. We don't know which one to use with this because Blanco ( 2yr old pit/chow) knows go to your cage, he will stop from ANYTHING and do this it's so cute! So should we teach Iggy go to your cage since when we say it Blanco will go to his cage even if we aren't talking to him, and model the behavior?
You could always teach Iggy a different cue for this. For Honey I use "go to bed" and for Spunky I use "sleep time". That way neither dog is confused.

3.) Work on sit
Sounds like you know what to do with this one... just practise, practise, practise. Practise in different settings, with different distraction levels... with a stranger around, with another dog around, in the park, in the store, etc. This is known as proofing and it's essential. How good is his sit right now?

4.) Wait. Mostly for his food because he jumps in the air about 20 feet like tigger from winnie the pooh. I have to stop and yell at him and say sit because he's knocking into my arm while I'm trying to pour the food. I guess a combo of sit and wait would be good.
Read the Doggy Zen sticky in the training forum -- it addresses this problem perfectly.

5.) Stay ( or should I just use wait for this? )
Some people distinguish between "stay" and "wait". Personally, I don't.

I'm gonna copy this from an old post of mine...

I think the most common mistake in training "stay" is asking too much, too early. There are a few criteria when it comes to a good "stay" -- in other words, a few things that you're asking your dog for: duration (a long stay), distance (a stay from afar) and distraction level (a stay in the dog park as opposed to a stay in your backyard). Train only ONE criteria at a time, and when you start out training "stay" for the first time, all three criteria should be as low as possible.

That means you put the dog in a sit right in front of you, in a low-distraction environment, and expect the butt to stay on the ground for all of maybe one second. If the dog tries to get up, you can either use a no reward marker or say "ah ah"; stick your hands out in a stop sign and put the dog back into a sit. Remember, you only want ONE second of sitting, not more. If the dog can do this one second, praise and treat. Don't add a "stay" cue yet.

As your dog masters the 1-second stay, right in front of you, you can start increasing the criteria. For example, you may ask for a 3-second stay right in front of you. But remember, when you want to start tightening one criteria, all the others must go back to zero (or as low as possible). For example, you want to work on distance -- then you go back to 1-second stays, 2 metres away from you, in a low-distraction environment. Or if you want to work on distraction level, you go back to 1-second stays, right in front of you, in a higher-distraction environment.

(from this thread: http://www.dogforums.com/3-dog-training-forum/46997-can-someone-tell-me.html)

This thread should be very helpful.
http://www.dogforums.com/3-dog-training-forum/48024-problems-off-lead.html
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Why not train an incompatible behaviour and cue that behaviour instead? Say, in the unlikely chance that I come home and Spunky is eating the garbage, I would ask her to come. She can't come to me and eat the garbage at the same time; so she comes to me, and the garbage eating stops. I walk into the kitchen and Honey has her paws up on the counter. I go over and ask for a sit. She sits. The counter-surfing stops.

Likewise, I catch my dog eating my Gucci loafers (not that I own any). I ask for a "give it" -- she gives me the loafer, and the loafer-eating stops.


Lol I don't own any either, just adding drama!!! Ya, but will the dog really know it isn't okay to do that then? Ya maybe I am distracting him, but say a little kid is writing on the wall, will me saying "Billy come sit" let him know it's not okay, or just distract him where he will go back to his "fun" new art pad later? If I tell him Billy no don't do that, if he is a very good boy he won't, if he wants to be a pain and is determined to do it he will.( just an example, obviously not exactley the same lol ) I want to let him know it's bad and upsets me and like I said I think he is like a new little kid he doesn't know better. Basically he sees " Oh a big bag with food, yummm, lemme go look!" I want him to know, noooo that is the garbage and you don't go in there. Like I said I don't really think he wants the garbage and is determined to go back later, he just wants to see what it is. For example, we left their bags of food right on the kitchen floor in the corner for a while( not secured tight, just rolled u kno). He smelled it and I told him, "Iggy no" in a calm, firm voice. He has never gotten into his food and it was there for weeks after that. I think since I stopped him and let him know it was bad before he saw all the food in there he didn't care too much after that. I dunno, I just think no can be useful with some things ;).


You can teach both together. Start by waiting for him to bark at something. When he barks, wait for him to be quiet. The minute he is quiet, click and treat. Do not say "quiet" yet. Just click and treat when he stops barking. Eventually he will come to expect a reward for being quiet -- you will recognise this point when he barks, keeps quiet and then looks at you. This is when you can add the "quiet" cue.


You could always teach Iggy a different cue for this. For Honey I use "go to bed" and for Spunky I use "sleep time". That way neither dog is confused.



Sounds like you know what to do with this one... just practise, practise, practise. Practise in different settings, with different distraction levels... with a stranger around, with another dog around, in the park, in the store, etc. This is known as proofing and it's essential. How good is his sit right now?


It's not too good. He sits right away sometimes and other times he takes forever, we just need to practice that one more.



Read the Doggy Zen sticky in the training forum -- it addresses this problem perfectly.



Some people distinguish between "stay" and "wait". Personally, I don't.

I'm gonna copy this from an old post of mine...

I think the most common mistake in training "stay" is asking too much, too early. There are a few criteria when it comes to a good "stay" -- in other words, a few things that you're asking your dog for: duration (a long stay), distance (a stay from afar) and distraction level (a stay in the dog park as opposed to a stay in your backyard). Train only ONE criteria at a time, and when you start out training "stay" for the first time, all three criteria should be as low as possible.

That means you put the dog in a sit right in front of you, in a low-distraction environment, and expect the butt to stay on the ground for all of maybe one second. If the dog tries to get up, you can either use a no reward marker or say "ah ah"; stick your hands out in a stop sign and put the dog back into a sit. Remember, you only want ONE second of sitting, not more. If the dog can do this one second, praise and treat. Don't add a "stay" cue yet.

As your dog masters the 1-second stay, right in front of you, you can start increasing the criteria. For example, you may ask for a 3-second stay right in front of you. But remember, when you want to start tightening one criteria, all the others must go back to zero (or as low as possible). For example, you want to work on distance -- then you go back to 1-second stays, 2 metres away from you, in a low-distraction environment. Or if you want to work on distraction level, you go back to 1-second stays, right in front of you, in a higher-distraction environment.

(from this thread: http://www.dogforums.com/3-dog-training-forum/46997-can-someone-tell-me.html)



This thread should be very helpful.
http://www.dogforums.com/3-dog-training-forum/48024-problems-off-lead.html[/QUOTE]


Thanks so much
 

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It's not too good. He sits right away sometimes and other times he takes forever, we just need to practice that one more.
Is it that he sometimes sits, and sometimes doesn't? Or is it that he always sits, but sometimes fast and sometimes slow?
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Well sometimes he does right away ( with no treat) and sometimes I have to say it 40 times =). Sometimes I don't reinforce him I just have to treat him all the time I think.
 

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Yeah, I would be reinforcing every good sit for now, and jackpotting him for really good ones (basically, spamming the dog with tons of treats every once in awhile).
 

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Please, teach me what No means. This should be easy since we speak a common language, unlike people and dogs. First, think of all of the many reasons you might say No to your dog. With that in mind, does No mean: Stop? Don't do that? Leave that alone? Don't leave that alone? Go to you? Don't go to you? Stay? Don't stay? Get up there? Don't get up there? Go? Don't go? Try again? End of story?
You could say that for almost any cue, though. Think of all the situations you could use "Here" (or "Come" or whatever) to get the dog to come to you. Does come mean come while sitting on the couch? While chasing a bird? While sniffing? While peeing? While circling to pee? While currently staying? While currently sitting? While currently fetching? While waiting? All of the above?

Most would probably say Come = Abort what you're doing, whatever it is, and get yourself by my side. Now. After all, that's pretty much the definition of a snappy recall, is it not?

For me, "No" is the same thing - Whatever it is, Stop, and give me your default behavior (sitting). And no, I didn't teach him to give me the behavior. He figured that part out. What I did teach was the default behavior (i.e. if you don't know what exactly to do, do this).

So why don't I just say "sit"? Well, it might be doing whatever it is AND sit down at the same time. So I got the sit I asked for, but he's still doing whatever I didn't want him to do (it's hard to say because he really doesn't to a lot of things anymore that I have to say 'No' to). So what do I do then? If I correct him - what am I correcting? The last thing he did was sit, which was what I asked for.

So I say No - halts his current behavior and if I don't give another direction in a few seconds, he'll give me his default behavior (sitting with eye contact).

This was especially good when I first got him when he doesn't know all the cues he does now. I, by fluke, taught him the default behavior of sitting when it was the only cue he knew. I made him sit to get anything. Now that I've read CU - I learned that I helped him develop that as his default behavior. So with a default, he now has something to offer when I said No and he didn't know what I *did* want, so he'll just sit, that's always been a "safe" behavior.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
very well said KB I def agree. Do you think after I say no I should wait a few secs and say sit so he will eventually know to sit down after I tell him no? Like you, I don't use no a lot, but there are just some things ya gotta say no to =).
 

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"Stay is very similar to wait, only they should be in a sit/down position and NOT stand. It's taught pretty much the same way as wait."


There are stand/stays in Obedience and Rally O. It's also handy to have in Agility for the start line. Stacked dogs in conformation are standing and staying in position. Of course stand/stays can also be useful outside of the showring, too. There is no rule that says you can't teach your dog to stay or wait in any position they can maintain, even standing and staying with such extreme criteria as this: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WT6M01gVrWM&feature=related
Ah, my mistake. I was just speaking from what I'm taught in basic obedience. :)
 
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