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How are you teaching him? What do you do when he does something right, and what do you do when he does something wrong?

Often dogs that are called 'stubborn' either don't fully understand the training yet, or haven't been provided with appropriate motivation.
 

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He sounds young and confused, not stubborn. I’m a new dog owner who used to wonder why traditional obedience classes tend not to take puppies younger than 16 weeks.

My pup turned 16 weeks yesterday. I don’t wonder anymore. A few days before she suddenly started doing all the puppy school exercises we’d struggled with. We were the worst team in the class. If it had have been graded, we’d have been flunking out.

It was shocking. Now, the only thing I wonder is how old the other pups are. I learned last week that one is 6 months. No wonder we were struggling!

I focus on what my pup does well (come, brushing & being scooped up), then intersperse these with things she hasn’t yet mastered. It works. She’s now downing immediately after sit in anticipation of being asked during puppy push ups.

Beyond a routine and soothing toy in her pen, the best, most elusive advice I’ve gotten is to encourage my pup to sleep. Suddenly things like biting practically died out. I was told 16-18 hours, but not consecutively. I had no idea. This would need monitoring in a family situation.

I also found that training and treats don’t work for my pup. She gets plenty of treats, but not for doing anything. I use regular kibble. This may also be due to her young age. Treats make her haywire.

How old approximately is your pup and how long have you had him? :)
 

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That's very young and a very short amount of time to expect a puppy to understand and perform a lot of commands! Puppies aren't born understanding human language, and are also baby animals with limited ability to focus and have self control - it takes time to teach them what you want them to do when you give them a command. Just like you wouldn't expect a human toddler to wash dishes or do the laundry just because you ask them to - those are skills they need time and maturity to fully understand and be capable of performing.

What are you teaching him, and how is he being "moody and stubborn"? If you explain exactly what the issue is,
 

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It took a ton of time to teach Ruby to sit. She’ll currently only for a treat. And she’s learned that down is the second stage of sit. She won’t down unless she’s sat first.

When you think about it, it’s a lot to expect them to figure out that it’s their body you want in a certain position.

Have you tried come on a long line? It might perk you both up. It’s easy. Get a favourite squeaky toy. Let him explore to the end of his leash. Squat > open your arms wide > squeak > say come once > continuously praise. You’ll be surprised! She took to it immediately. Now, if she sees me squat or especially spread my arms, she makes a beeline for me.

Fetch seems harder. About half the time she’ll give the donut or ball back. The other half she prances about with it. Probably easier with a sporting breed. Do you know what type of puppy you have? You could tailor tricks to it.
 

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Don't expect much from such a young dog. The dog may actually know what you want, but because of its age is simply seeing what it can get away with in terms of bad behavior.

Be consistent, be patient, and don't give up. The pup has to learn everything you want of it at this point. Although playing fetch may not be in the cards for your dog. Some dogs have no drive or desire to play fetch.
 

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In 10 days, a 13 week old puppy is very unlikely to know what you want.

You need to put in the effort to teach him.

Hold a favorite toy in your hands. Talk to the toy, turn it over looking at it. When puppy tries to take the toy, ignore puppy. AS SOON AS puppy sits, give him the toy and praise him. Repeat often. As puppy starts sitting quickly, add the word "sit" - hold the toy and talk to the toy and turnit over looking at it; when puppy comes over, say "sit", as soon as puppy sits, give him the toy and praise him. Repeat often. Now start asking him to sit for other things - treats, before going outside, putting on his leash, etc. Always praise him when he sits. He'll catch on quickly.

Most likely right now, you are telling him to sit as an end to his fun. He's playing with the ball and you tell him to sit so you can take the ball away from him. In YOUR mind, you are doing it so you can throw the ball again. In HIS mind, you are taking away his toy.

You want to teach him that your taking the ball doesn't mean an end to the fun. Using the process above, you're going to add a step. When he has a toy, simply take hold of an end. Don't pull on it or fight for it. Just hold it and say "let me see it". At some point, he will loosen his grip to get a better hold. At that time, pull it away from it calmly. Hold the toy up and talk to it and turn it over looking at it. As soon as he sits, give it back and praise him.

Dogs are like kids, they want you to want what they have - but they don't want you to take it away. You are using the above game to teach him that you love his toy but won't take it away. As you repeat the game, he will start to bring his toys to you to see - because he knows you will give them back when he asks politely (sits).

With ball playing, many dogs never enjoy fetching. They want to chase the ball, but don't want to give it back. You can try offering him a treat for giving up the ball. You can play the "let me see it" game above. You can get a second ball and when he comes close with the first ball, throw the second ball. When he goes to get the second ball, pick up the first ball. Repeat.

You don't want to grab for the ball. This becomes a game of keep away for the dog. And it's a fun game for them.

My own Tornado-dog will play "go ahead, try to take it" with me as much as we play fetch. I'll throw the ball, he'll go get it and bring it back, then he spends several minutes dropping it in front of me and grabbing it back if I try to pick it up. It's a fun game. I just wait patiently until he decides he's ready for me to throw the ball again. Sometimes he does that just so he can catch his breath before continuing the fetch game. As fetch is a game, not a job, I don't stress that he doesn't do it exactly "right" each time. As long as he's having fun, we play it his way.
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I teach him by having a toy in my hand and ask the toy to sit show him how to sit these all tricks I'm using but my pup don't want to learn. He always do what he want to.
it's lil bit strange to me. How you started teaching your pup from day one t now, any of you can explain it please?
 

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Dogs aren't visual learners like we are, so he just doesn't understand that he's supposed to mimic the toy!

Videos might be easier to learn from than us writing out all the steps. Here's a couple to get you started - the first focuses on sit, down, and stay, and the second is a whole bunch of behaviors and skills you can teach a puppy once you're more comfortable with training!

 
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