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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
How can I teach stay? It seems simple, but I've not found anything in a quick search of the forum. My pups are 7 months, and know some commands- sit, down, shake- but a stay would be really useful. I've been doing the "Protocol for Relxation" as one of my pups is kind of nervous, so I think they're already doing a stay, in a way.
 

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The we learned in class is this -

- place your dog in a sit or down
- say stay and hold your hand out in a "stop" signal (like school crossing guards)
- mark and reinforce almost immediately, assuming your dog doesn't move
- repeat steps, adding time in very small increments between saying / signaling stay and marking / rewarding
- eventually add distance by taking baby steps away from and back towards your dog after he's been asked to stay

I was amazed that this seemed to work; now Katie will (usually) sit and stay while we wait for cars to pass on our walks :) The times she doesn't is when she's already distracted by a scent.

I believe Kikopup has a video: Stay and Simple Safety Stay.

Hope this helps.
 

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You should get yourself a book on puppy training - this is covered in every one that I know of. It is pretty basic dog training and it isn't rocket science, so it shouldn't be hard to apply.

The most common approach uses shaping of one sort or another - which is generally successful with puppies. Here's one description:

Training A Dog To Stay Step by Step Techniques


There are other ways to teach it - mostly to be used on dogs that for one reason or another are not very biddable - but you should try this way first.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
You should get yourself a book on puppy training - this is covered in every one that I know of. It is pretty basic dog training and it isn't rocket science, so it shouldn't be hard to apply.

The most common approach uses shaping of one sort or another - which is generally successful with puppies. Here's one description:
Wanna mail me one to Brazil? :) We don't have any bookstores within a 3 hours drive, and when I did get to a bookstore, there was nothing on dog training. Sadly, they still hit and intimidate a lot here. :-( This forum has taught me everything I know, and my pups are doing really well!
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Thank you cookieface. I think my dogs will easily be able to do what you described.
 

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Wanna mail me one to Brazil? :) We don't have any bookstores within a 3 hours drive, and when I did get to a bookstore, there was nothing on dog training. Sadly, they still hit and intimidate a lot here. :-( This forum has taught me everything I know, and my pups are doing really well!
Can't mail you a book, but check out the sticky at the top of the training section for training videos and Dr. Ian Dunbar's dog training site and Kikopup's site. There's an absolutely amazing amount of information available on the web and these are the best resources I've found. Also, the ASPCA has a "virtual behaviorist" that addresses some common problems with positive training methods - it's a nice resource for those issues that inevitably arise.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
[Also, the ASPCA has a "virtual behaviorist" that addresses some common problems with positive training methods - it's a nice resource for those issues that inevitably arise.[/QUOTE]

Wow! Sure would like to know more about this!

I think one of the problems I've run into is sooooo much information. I wish I just had a chart I could work off of: 1. teach this 2. Teach this.

I did read Dunbar's free e-books, and followed his suggestions- socialized the dogs, potty trained them (quite quickly!), etc.
 

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I haven't taught my dogs "stay", they know "sit until released". It's much easier to use a cue they already know ("sit") than to introduce a new word that only means "keep doing what you're already doing".

It's pretty simple, from now on, when you tell the dog to sit, the dog isn't allowed to move until you give a release cue ("free" or "break" or "ok"). If they get up before released, put them back, and every time they break they have to sit for at least 10 seconds before they are released. If you've been doing the PoR, you're pretty much already doing this, you just need to be consistent and gradually build up duration and distractions.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
This is interesting. So my dogs will sit or lay down for a long time. I guess I need ot just pair it with a verbal command for when I'm farther away? IDK. Any tips?
 

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Not sure what you mean. Sitting at a distance isn't really any different. It's part of proofing the sit, teaching the dog that "sit" means that he is to sit no matter where he is and what he's doing and remain sitting until you give the release cue.

But of course you gradually have to build up distance and distractions. Start at home, tell the dog to sit, only reward the fast ones and the ones where he doesn't move towards you (might have to shape this by only rewarding when he takes 3 steps towards you before sitting and not reward when he takes 5 steps towards you etc), do moving sits, i.e. have them in the heel position, slow down slightly, ask for a sit, then keep moving. You might have to stop completely the first few times, but eventually you want to keep walking or even running, ask for a sit and the dog's butt slams to the ground while you keep going.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Not sure what you mean. Sitting at a distance isn't really any different. It's part of proofing the sit, teaching the dog that "sit" means that he is to sit no matter where he is and what he's doing and remain sitting until you give the release cue.

But of course you gradually have to build up distance and distractions. Start at home, tell the dog to sit, only reward the fast ones and the ones where he doesn't move towards you (might have to shape this by only rewarding when he takes 3 steps towards you before sitting and not reward when he takes 5 steps towards you etc), do moving sits, i.e. have them in the heel position, slow down slightly, ask for a sit, then keep moving. You might have to stop completely the first few times, but eventually you want to keep walking or even running, ask for a sit and the dog's butt slams to the ground while you keep going.
That's exactly what I was asking. Sorry I wasn't clear, but you nailed it!
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Here is my favorite stay video. I think the key is to do it very slowly. You want your dog to be successful.
That's a GREAT video. Thank you! My digs love plastic, also.
 
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