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Our 5 year old Sheltie was licking herself a lot. After close inspection, we decided to bring her to the vet ( with a urine sample). She was diagnosed with UTI, her urine contained a lot of crystal oxalate, white blood cells but no blood cell at all. She was put on antibiotics and Xrays where taken. The vet recommend that the stone be removed surgically as his suspicion is crystal oxalate stone according to the urinalysis. He also put her on Royal Canin urinary S/O diet.
Our concern is: Our sheltie has no other signs or symptoms. She drinks, eat, plays, urinate normally.
Do we really need to put her through major surgery or should we do the diet, and wait and see?


Follow up
we had another set of xrays taken and the vet recommended the removal of the stone ( he tought he saw a stone)There were NO stones in her bladder, what they thought was a stone on the xrays was a mucosal fold, like hyperplasia Vet says that the crystal caused that from all the irritation they were causing. He irrigated her bladder really well, and flushed all the crystals out of there. He said we did the right thing going ahead with surgery (if it had been his dog, that's what he would have done) because he got to flush the bladder getting rid of the crystals, something that might have not been entirely possible with diet alone. Now that she's on the diet, this will prevent any future formation of stones or further crystals hopefully With this surgery, we probably prevented stones.
He said if we didn't do the surgery we would have spent much more money chasing after something that wasn't even there in the first place. Even if we had done the ultrasound, and they wouldn't have seen a stone that wasn't there, his recommendation would still have been exploratory surgery.

bottom line, we could have not done it and she would have been fine except that the crystals irritating her vulva would have taken much much longer to flush or not flush at all.
After all this.... did we do the right thing? we only followed our vets trusted advice. I'm not at all sure about all of this now.
 

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yes, in my personal opinion, you did the right thing. Calcium oxalates do not dissolve, even with a prescription diet. they cease formation in an acidic environment, which is why dogs with calcium oxalates still go on a prescription diet. You can some times break them up using ultrasound waves, but that's still risky and painful as they pass.
now you can move forward with a special diet, distilled water, and wet food (for added moisture) and hopefully it will be the end of your urinary distress days!
 

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there was no way to absolutely know for sure. an xray can give you hints but it's not a definite mode of diagnoses. Remember it's "practicing" medicine, its never 100% accurate
 

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Of course you did the right thing! The vet saw something and if the bladder was that irritated those crystals needed to be flushed out.

Look up Fuzzer Food. A pet owner developed it when several of her dogs developed oxalate KIDNEY stones. Feed no oxalatebut there is a wide variety of foods to choose from, distilled water and a certain sort of calcium supplement is all it is. There are some particular supplements that help as well. With oxalates you raise the pH not lower it. They are caused by a faulty system and must be controlled by diet. Keep the pH higher, and the system very well hydrated.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
thank you for your reply. I feel bad looking at her straining to urinate and seeing blood in her urine but the vet assures me it's normal. This site and your replies are reassuring.
 
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