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I have had all of my dogs, past and present, purebred and mixed breeds and they have all come back exactly as I expected, pure we're pure, mixes we're what vets and I guessed, with a few traces of random breeds mixed in. Wisdom panel cheek swab and one blood test done by vet, also wisdom panel
 

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I'm just curious what Daisy is since the litter owners (surrendered them to the Animal Shelter) said American Bull Dog and German Shepherd yet Daisy looks like a Beagle mix I'd like to get an idea what to expect, size wise. I prefer big dogs and will be disappointed if she remains short and small, tho I'll love her dearly.

With this being rural Georgia, she's probably got more breeds mixed in her lines than would fit on an 8 X 11 sheet of paper!
 

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I'm just curious what Daisy is since the litter owners (surrendered them to the Animal Shelter) said American Bull Dog and German Shepherd yet Daisy looks like a Beagle mix I'd like to get an idea what to expect, size wise. I prefer big dogs and will be disappointed if she remains short and small, tho I'll love her dearly.

With this being rural Georgia, she's probably got more breeds mixed in her lines than would fit on an 8 X 11 sheet of paper!
the DNA tests in this thread are not testing for what mix is your dog they are for testing specific health conditions.
 

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Okay Thanks! I thought it was like the DNA they're pushing on Ancestry

Diane
 

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I guess you weren't alive during the start of WW2, and didn't pay attention in history class. A declaration of war isn't what defines a war; a course of aggression against other countries is. The French and British formally engaged in the war after Germany invaded the Rhineland, Austria, Czechoslovakia, and Poland, breaking numerous negotiated agreements. Geographically, they had no other choice; they expected Germany's course of unchecked aggression to lead their eventual invasion.

Yes, human experiments in selective breeding of humans, started long before the nut that started WW2 promoted racial purity, ignoring all past failures and his own highly suspect genetic heritage.

As far as questionable dog breeding goals go, you can't blame the Clubs for staring it. Competitive dog shows preceded their organization. Few working dog breeders prior to that time were especially concerned with "pure" breeding - they valued demonstrated ability and health over "pure" parentage.

Sportsmen started the Kennel Club (UK) after British Victorians in the mid-19th century, had already started the trend away from useful/working dog breeding toward fad breeding of show dogs, starting with the conformation Dog Show of 1859. The explosion of breeds can be directly tracked back to that time and culture. The Kennel Club (UK) was founded more than a decade later in 1873, with the stated purposes of establishing consistent set of rules for governing the popular new activities of dog showing and field trials ( http://www.thekennelclub.org.uk/our-resources/about-the-kennel-club/history-of-the-kennel-club/#sthash.U3zXf7Nk.dpuf ). The AKC was founded a decade after the Kennel Club.

Neither organization directly encourages development of new breeds, but merely recognizes some of them by a combination of their external physical characteristics and parentage - perpetuating the unhealthy Victorian attitude that appearance and parentage is more important than actual integrity. Only recently has there been an effort by clubs to block registration of dogs known to be carriers of generic health problems that don't affect morphology /typology (appearance). The KC has compulsory health tests for only 2 of the 200+ registered breeds- the Irish Setter and Irish Red and White Setter.

Most "designer" cross breeds (cockapoo, labradoodle, etc) come from puppy mills and owners who aren't KC or AKC members. Few are breeds registered (recognized) by the Clubs, and are eligible for competition/conformation showing.
 

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Through forced evolution the dog has several variants in its genes, some by design and others as side effects.

Humans breed like rats (sorry) with little or no concern for genes.

I'm just saying that it is unrealistic to assume a similarity.
The mechanics of mutation are more or less the same for all mammals. There is no particular reason to think mutations are more or less common in dogs than in humans. Once a non-lethal mutation is into a breeding population, it is hard to get it out, particularly if it is recessive. What is different between dogs and humans is that selective breeding, especially inbreeding, in dogs reduces the diversity within a single breed, and increases the frequency of homozygous alleles in the average animal. Result: rare recessive mutations are more likely to be expressed in dogs than in humans. Some of these are harmless, some not.
 

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I did this with my girl. I thought she was just a super mutt but turned out that she had 3 almost pure dogs. One side was pure and he other was until he generation right before her. I can see the behavior and physical body of all three breeds. Everyone knew she was a cattle dog mix, from her face, so I was happy to see that was a main one. All working dogs, yippee... Much exercise..
 

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I did this with my girl. I thought she was just a super mutt but turned out that she had 3 almost pure dogs. One side was pure and he other was until he generation right before her. I can see the behavior and physical body of all three breeds. Everyone knew she was a cattle dog mix, from her face, so I was happy to see that was a main one. All working dogs, yippee... Much exercise..
These tests are not the same test you did on your girl these are DNA health tests which are totally different than Guess the mix tests.
 

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The thread was started as a place to list what genetic health testing is available for dogs, not the breed tests like Wisdom panel. Although it has sort of drifted in that direction.
 

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What do you mean? It sounds like it's the same thing. I sent a swab test and all. Isn't that it?
No, they are not the same.
DNA health tests are for finding genetic markers in specific breeds to avoid passing on health issues when breeding.
DNA breed tests like you are talking about are for attempting to find out what breeds are in your mixed breed.

Both DNA health tests and DNA breed tests are done with cheek swabs or blood draws but the information desired is very different, this thread is specifically intended for the health tests not the breed tests.


For example my purebred Australian Shepherds have been DNA health tested to check for hereditary cataracts and for the MDR1 mutation gene. I do these DNA tests to help make breeding decisions to make the next generation of dogs healthier.
 

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I like the idea of genetic testing and am happy to do it for diseases that I think are important, but I find the proliferation of tests a little frightening. Will breeders end up being expected to send of 20 swabs to different laboratories? Are we going to end up testing for things where the probability of a carrier is only a few percent (eg, narcolepsy).
Another worry: How good is quality control?
I know there are problems because I once used a dog (Labrador) who had been genetically color tested and was said to carry chocolate. When I used him over a chocolate girl there were no chocolate pups, and no chocolate points in a litter of 10. The odds of this are about 1000:1. I had a swab from this dog sent to another laboratory and he came out negative for chocolate. Color is trivial, and there wal little harm done in this case. But a false negative on some diseases could result in some awful outcomes . . .like a litter of pups where half went blind. Not to mention possible propagation of error where breeders use 'negative by inheritance' reasoning.
I hope some day some lab will offer a service that does a whole panel of tests from one sample . . . as happens with some blood tests . . . and comes up with a coherent genetic outline.
 

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Breeding carrierxcarrier could equal normal/normal, normal/affected (carrier) or affected/affected. Ever hear of a Punnett square? http://anthro.palomar.edu/mendel/mendel_2.htm
Smarter than breeding carrierxcarrier would be breeding normal/carrier or even an exceptional dog who is affected to a normal, though it would take more generations to breed all normal dogs.
I found nice schemes with explanations here:http://www.animalabs.com/introduction-to-dog-genetics-modes-of-inheritance/
 
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