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I have a siberian husky and a dogo argentino roughly same age at 18 weeks. The dogo listens very well and learns all his trick good as the husky is super duper stubborn. Now I do husky in particular are very stubborn because of the intelligence, but in my case my pup was from a bad home it seems like and she's very scared and nervous of everything. even with things shes see and been around before me included (sometimes). Is there anyways i can go and about to help her with her nervousness? i think it could be the reason for the stubbornness. or could it simply be because she no longer likes her treat?
 

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What, specifically, is she being stubborn about? Won't sit? Won't down? What exactly is she doing? It could be that she doesn't fully understand the command, which wouldn't be unusual at only 18 weeks. It could also be that she's too nervous to perform the command. It could also be that the reward is not really that enticing for her.
 

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What, specifically, is she being stubborn about? Won't sit? Won't down? What exactly is she doing? It could be that she doesn't fully understand the command, which wouldn't be unusual at only 18 weeks. It could also be that she's too nervous to perform the command. It could also be that the reward is not really that enticing for her.
she knows the commands I’m sure because when she’s hungry she listens to just about everything or when she’s happy she listens very well but she has those moments at times where I would wait 10 minutes just for a sit. I’ve tried cheese and boiled chicken as treats are there any other healthy treats out there?
 

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Also if you say it’s nervousness what can I do to help her? I think I could be that also based on her tails being tuck at times. She never gets yelled at by me but not sure about previous owner. But she does tuck her tail at times for noises she’s heard of. Or could it be my other pup scaring her when I’m not there?
 

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The fear and nervousness is likely genetic. It may be exacerbated by her going through a fear period (18 weeks is about right for a fear period). When she is fearful, don't buy into it and simply act and be calm and cool. Your concern will increase her concern.

Repetitious training, even with food, can be uninteresting. She is not being stubborn. She likely does not understand of finds you uninteresting. I do not know of ANY "stubborn" dogs.
 

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The fear and nervousness is likely genetic. It may be exacerbated by her going through a fear period (18 weeks is about right for a fear period). When she is fearful, don't buy into it and simply act and be calm and cool. Your concern will increase her concern.

Repetitious training, even with food, can be uninteresting. She is not being stubborn. She likely does not understand of finds you uninteresting. I do not know of ANY "stubborn" dogs.
if that’s the case what else can I do to train her?
 

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Keep training sessions short. 5 minutes. No more. If the dog does what you want, reward immediately and heavily. Food, toy whatever. Be sure the dog is hungry. MARK the correct behavior with YES and then feed. YES releases the dog for the reward. MAKE TRAINING FUN. If you get something you want in 3 minutes, then stop there.

For every minute of training you need to play for two minutes. Keep it fun. Keep it happy. KEEP IT SHORT. This dog is a BABY at 18 weeks. She is easily distracted and her attention spans are very very short. Just like a Toddler...
 

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In order to be "stubborn" a dog has to absolutely, without question, know what you want, and then willfully not do it. At 18 weeks, she's not stubborn, she just hasn't learned yet. If you are "waiting 10 minutes for a sit", then your training is the issue, not her being stubborn.

Keep sessions short. Five minutes is a long time at that age. It's much better to do a minute here and a minute there throughout the day than to have a single 30 minute long session.

If you don't get a behavior within 10 seconds or so, help her by luring her into position. Mark and reward all attempts to do what you ask. Jackpot when she does something especially well.

Remember that dogs don't generalize well. Just because you have a "sit" in the kitchen doesn't mean she knows that "sit" means the same thing in the dining room, the living room , the bedroom, the back yard, the front yard.... well, you get the picture. You have to practice in lots of different places to help them realize that "sit" means" "plant your butt on the ground" no matter where you are.

The nervousness can be at least partly genetic, but it can also stem from not being properly handled during some critical developmental stages. When you are socializing her, don't force her to interact with things or people if she doesn't want to. Let her look at them from a distance she is comfortable with.

Also, since you have two pups that are the same age, look into littermate syndrome. It doesn't apply to just littermates, but to all dogs that are close in age.

If you don't have access to a good, positive based in-person trainer to work with, or even in conjunction with them, there are a couple of online classes that I think would help you. The first one is running live starting October 1, called Performance Fundamentals. https://fenzidogsportsacademy.com/index.php/courses/49 The second is a self-study class called Raising a Performance Puppy. https://fenzidogsportsacademy.com/index.php/courses/24 ALthough they both say "performance", they are good, basic classes that all dogs can benefit from.
 

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I agree that she doesn't sound stubborn. It might be that she's unsure what you are asking so keep training short and simple till she is older. Also train her without the Dogo around to minimize distractions.

I know it's hard but do not react to nervous/scared behavior such as a tucked in tail, flattened ears etc... Reacting might subconsciously reinforce it. If she show that kind of behavior stop training for a while. My reasoning behind this is that while she's nervous she might be mentally preoccupied with whatever is causing it and won't concentrate on the exercise.
 
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