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This might be the first time these comments have been stated in the history of the world but yes, my girl doesn't want to eat much right now.


I had her on this bully max food for a while and she was eating it like a ravenous monster. I ran out of it and bought something else (another good brand - blue buffalo). She hated the food but still ate some of it. Anyways, I got my shipment of bully max and I am still struggling to get her to eat. She's eating more of it than the blue buffalo but it's still a total struggle. I have to feed her one by one and even throw the pieces on the floor in front of her and almost force her to eat. I've been able to get her to eat a bit by putting some peanut butter into the bowl but she still doesn't finish it...she used to finish 2 full of plates and ask for more and more and more.


What do I do? I want her to be a 80 lb monster. I can't have her be skinny. She seems super healthy and full of tons of energy. Her poops are very solid and healthy looking
 

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I've already typed and deleted three replies. I can't even tonight.
 
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How much is she actually eating right now? In cups, grams, calories, whatever you can best estimate. There's a big difference between a puppy 'not eating' as in refusing food after five kibbles and 'not eating' as in now eating one 'plate' and is then full. I'd also be careful about making mealtimes a big production. You could be overpressuring her by going through all these hoops and coaxing her to eat, and causing food time to actually be stressful. I'd put down a portion that's appropriate for supporting her current weight and age, walk away for twenty minutes, then calmly pick up the leftovers and try again next mealtime.

Her parents were not 80lbs. She's a female, which tend on average to be smaller in dogs than males of the same breed. If she does not have the genetics to be 80lbs at her ideal, healthy weight or even her heavily conditioned, most muscular weight, she may just not be interested in eating the same amount a puppy who is going to be 80lbs would. This is good. Overfeeding a puppy does not get you more muscle or a bigger skeletal structure - it gets you a fat puppy. Which can lead to early arthritis, hip and elbow issues, diabetes, heart problems, and more. A dog that is 'bulked up' by overfeeding is a sad thing indeed, and not at all impressive compared to a dog that is actually muscled through careful, safe conditioning exercises.

And yes, I've seen the before vs after Bullymax ads. I am extremely skeptical that it's possible to get those results from diet alone, just like the fakey human diet ads that show someone magically going from scrawny to bodybuilder because they change one 'simple' thing like cutting carbs. I'd bet you anything those dogs are also doing conditioning exercises to get those results. Additionally, even if it's a great food for healthy muscle development, if you feed too much of it you'll still get a fat dog or a ton of poop or both. Just like it's possible for someone who eats lots of healthy veggies and lean meats to gain weight if they're eating massive amounts of calories.

I said it before and I'll say it again. If her hitting a certain number on the scale was that important to you, you needed to have picked a dog from a breed and lineage that almost always reaches 80+lbs. But you didn't, and now you have her. You need to accept her and do what's best for her health, no matter how she develops, and regardless of whether she tends towards being skinny. In fact, she probably will have kind of a scrawny, awkward period during her adolescence, which could last up to a couple years, assuming you do keep her at a healthy weight. Many dogs don't settle into their 'adult' structure until they're two, and the bigger the dog, the longer that can take.
 

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Unless your dog is a mastiff breed, it shouldn't be 80 pounds
there is a huge difference between fat and fit.
big/fat dogs aren't cool.
 

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Agree with DaySleepers

what was "two full plates" in actual cups? Measuring cups, not drinking cups or random dishware.

ABPT females are NOT supposed to be 80 lbs. 40-60 lbs is much more in the appropriate range. My female pit bull is about 62-64 lbs and she's taller than average.

Overfeeding does not make a big (tall and strong) dog. It makes a big (fat) dog.

There are several calorie calculators out there where you can enter her age, breed, sex, spay or not spayed status and activity level to get a ballpark of how many calories you should be feeding.

Blue Buffalo also has a lot of complaints of digestive upset so she may just need some nice plain kibble for a few weeks, like a basic chicken and rice or salmon and rice formula (ProPlan Sensitive Skin and Stomach is a good option)
 

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How much is she actually eating right now? In cups, grams, calories, whatever you can best estimate. There's a big difference between a puppy 'not eating' as in refusing food after five kibbles and 'not eating' as in now eating one 'plate' and is then full. I'd also be careful about making mealtimes a big production. You could be overpressuring her by going through all these hoops and coaxing her to eat, and causing food time to actually be stressful. I'd put down a portion that's appropriate for supporting her current weight and age, walk away for twenty minutes, then calmly pick up the leftovers and try again next mealtime.

Her parents were not 80lbs. She's a female, which tend on average to be smaller in dogs than males of the same breed. If she does not have the genetics to be 80lbs at her ideal, healthy weight or even her heavily conditioned, most muscular weight, she may just not be interested in eating the same amount a puppy who is going to be 80lbs would. This is good. Overfeeding a puppy does not get you more muscle or a bigger skeletal structure - it gets you a fat puppy. Which can lead to early arthritis, hip and elbow issues, diabetes, heart problems, and more. A dog that is 'bulked up' by overfeeding is a sad thing indeed, and not at all impressive compared to a dog that is actually muscled through careful, safe conditioning exercises.

And yes, I've seen the before vs after Bullymax ads. I am extremely skeptical that it's possible to get those results from diet alone, just like the fakey human diet ads that show someone magically going from scrawny to bodybuilder because they change one 'simple' thing like cutting carbs. I'd bet you anything those dogs are also doing conditioning exercises to get those results. Additionally, even if it's a great food for healthy muscle development, if you feed too much of it you'll still get a fat dog or a ton of poop or both. Just like it's possible for someone who eats lots of healthy veggies and lean meats to gain weight if they're eating massive amounts of calories.

I said it before and I'll say it again. If her hitting a certain number on the scale was that important to you, you needed to have picked a dog from a breed and lineage that almost always reaches 80+lbs. But you didn't, and now you have her. You need to accept her and do what's best for her health, no matter how she develops, and regardless of whether she tends towards being skinny. In fact, she probably will have kind of a scrawny, awkward period during her adolescence, which could last up to a couple years, assuming you do keep her at a healthy weight. Many dogs don't settle into their 'adult' structure until they're two, and the bigger the dog, the longer that can take.
Her mom is 75 lbs, dad is big too. I give her lots of hard exercise. 75-80 lbs should be safe. She's already enormous for an 8 month old


But everything changed after me giving her that blue buffalo food. Before that, she used to want 10 bowls of bully max
 

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I'm not sure why you're here. You seem absolutely determined to ignore any advice you're given - even after you ask for advice. That isn't specifically against forum rules, but it's very bad forum etiquette to waste everyone's time and - at some point - the moderators are going to pull the plug on whatever game you're playing.

It could be very soon.
 
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Her mom is 75 lbs, dad is big too. I give her lots of hard exercise. 75-80 lbs should be safe. She's already enormous for an 8 month old


But everything changed after me giving her that blue buffalo food. Before that, she used to want 10 bowls of bully max
an 8 month old does not have closed growth plates and should NOT being doing a lot of "hard exercise" at risk of doing permanent damage to her joints.

10 bowls of a 500+ kcal/cup food is insane amounts for anything short of a sled dog basically. Aside "bowl" being a wildly imprecise measurement.

Run a calorie calculator, be careful of over exercise, and feed to appropriate body condition.

If you think she is not feeling well, have a vet check.
 

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an 8 month old does not have closed growth plates and should NOT being doing a lot of "hard exercise" at risk of doing permanent damage to her joints.

10 bowls of a 500+ kcal/cup food is insane amounts for anything short of a sled dog basically. Aside "bowl" being a wildly imprecise measurement.

Run a calorie calculator, be careful of over exercise, and feed to appropriate body condition.

If you think she is not feeling well, have a vet check.
Is it possible there is something wrong with her even though she's very energetic and her poops are very healthy looking and solid? She's in a great mood all the time

I didn't feed her 10 bowls. She wanted 10 bowls, she never stopped wanting to eat. Everything changed after the blue buffalo switch of the dog food
 

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She's also still very young and her growth may be slowing down, eg she's not as hungry. I'd still like to know how much she's actually eating, to get an idea of whether this is an issue that needs veterinary intervention or just a very normal shift in appetite/metabolism as she enters a different stage of growth.

Hard exercise can actively hurt a growing puppy - that is not a safe or appropriate way to condition a dog. Free play on a soft surface (grass or dirt) is usually fine, but there should be no forced running, pulling, jumping, weight bearing, etc. unless you want a high risk of lifelong joint issues and a dog who cannot be fit and active no matter what. Especially if she's exceptionally 'huge' or has grown very fast. You want to see slow, steady growth on larger breed puppies, especially if you want to do sports or other hard exercise with them as an adult.
 

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She's also still very young and her growth may be slowing down, eg she's not as hungry. I'd still like to know how much she's actually eating, to get an idea of whether this is an issue that needs veterinary intervention or just a very normal shift in appetite/metabolism as she enters a different stage of growth.

Hard exercise can actively hurt a growing puppy - that is not a safe or appropriate way to condition a dog. Free play on a soft surface (grass or dirt) is usually fine, but there should be no forced running, pulling, jumping, weight bearing, etc. unless you want a high risk of lifelong joint issues and a dog who cannot be fit and active no matter what. Especially if she's exceptionally 'huge' or has grown very fast. You want to see slow, steady growth on larger breed puppies, especially if you want to do sports or other hard exercise with them as an adult.

I just have her do tug of war and fetch up the stairs. Nothing else. Her muscles are growing very large though. I think she is half or quarter lab. She's very very big for a female pitbull puppy

Any thought on why she stopped wanting to eat after this switch of the dog food brand ?
 

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Stairs are very high on the list of things NOT to let puppies run up and down on excessively. Please try to find a grassy area to play fetch with her instead - on a long line, if necessary.

How much is she actually eating right now?
 

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Her mom is 75 lbs, dad is big too. I give her lots of hard exercise. 75-80 lbs should be safe. She's already enormous for an 8 month old
Her dam being 75 pounds doesn't mean that her dam is at a healthy weight or condition. Her sire being "big" doesn't mean that he is at a healthy weight or condition, either.

Giving a puppy "a lot of hard exercise" can damage growing bones and joints, leading to lifelong orthopedic problems, including early onset arthritis and may contribute to hip dysplasia. Being overweight as a puppy also contributes to orthopedic issues.
 
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First off, if her parents where that large they are not pitbulls.

Second omg answer how much does the really eat?

what you think isn't enough is probably plenty based off what you've said
 

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I just have her do tug of war and fetch up the stairs. Nothing else. Her muscles are growing very large though. I think she is half or quarter lab. She's very very big for a female pitbull puppy

Any thought on why she stopped wanting to eat after this switch of the dog food brand ?
Fetch on stairs is one of the highest impact (most problematic for the joints) exercises you can do, short of basically weight pulling.

Tug can be OK in limited amounts.

aim for lots of loose leash walking on grass or dirt trails, free play on grass or dirt either in a fenced area or on a long line, and some gentle medium type hill walk or hiking.

and


tell us how much she is actually eating

like, measurements dude

can't help a dang bit otherwise

could be slowing growth makes her less hungry esp since you seem to have no idea how much she should be eating and maybe let her eat more than needed (?)

or she could be barely eating enough cals to get by and needs a vet
 

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weight pulling is low-impact and one of the safest activies you can do.

Wouldn't reccomend for a puppy though
Safely done with proper equipment, proper weight amount for an adult dog it can be quite safe.

For someone who is trying to bulk up a puppy, I really don't want them to even consider "switching" to some homemade weight pull setup to muscle up in a haphazard way.

There are higher impact sports but those typically aren't viewed as a muscle building bully dog thing like weight pull can be seen in some circles
 

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Yes, you said that weight pull is short of running up stairs, and its not. You can even do it safely for puppies, I've seen breeders introduce harnesses and have dogs pull milk cartons as young as 8 wks and its totally safe.

Obviously weight isn't added til 12 months, but for a 8 month old dog, in theory you could do introduction.

Saying weight pull is high impact is quite the opposite of the truth though.

My dog was muscly as all of the APBTS I see on the internet when we where doing daily agility.
 

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ok, sorry I did not perfectly word it.

Weight pull done wrong is really bad.

This poster is already selecting exercise options that are risky and feeding with a specific goal of having a big dog ("can't have her be skinny")

I was making a quick highlight to help head off what is a common mistake in people looking to overly quickly muscle up young bully breed dogs which is tossing weighted items on them or behind them.
 
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