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Yesterday the truck had to be serviced so I took my young dog with me to work and parked the truck in the close by concrete parking garage (it is cool in there). It gave me an "excuse" to walk at lunch and work and play with my dog. We had a nice walk and it was a good day.

After work I went to the dealer to have the truck serviced and while that is going on we wait in the waiting area (it is dog friendly) and my young dog gets the "sometimes you just have to chill and hang out" lesson. He is such a goof.. it took him about 20 minutes to figure out the "job" was to just lay there and do not much of anything (not lay on your back waving all fours in the air, untying my shoelaces with his teeth or playing with his own back feet).

Of course people walk through and it was late enough in the day that kids also came through. Except for a couple of questions and telling one (older lady so an adult!!) to please not pet my dog when they approached without asking, everyone was either mildly interested or ignored. Two or three asked what kind of dog (they had never seen an all black German Shepherd). Thew KIDS were the best behaved of the lot!

I thought "this is great for training..." but then it happened. This guy who works in the parts Dept. came out and practically RAN toward my dog with his hand out to pet him.. and I said, "Please do not pet my dog." He stopped... and said, "Oh.." with his mouth left in an "o" and stood there. "I have a 'way' with animals" he said. I said all fine and well, but please do not pet my dog.

This guy was older.. like in his 60's but he acted like a petulant child. He stood there, just barely far enough back bent over at the waist and stared at my dog and started talking to him a little (crap like "your Mommy won't let me pet you and I know you want to be petted" (NOT. He does not want to be petted.. but I kept silent). Mostly he just stood and stared intensely HOPING the dog would break his Platz and come over to him (and he was just at the right distance for it to happen).

Now my dog is balanced and confident but at 15 months old he is still young in the head and platz is usually good but here we are in a strange place with strange ppl and this weirdo is standing there STARING at him for MINUTES. It was pretty unfair to the dog. Most dogs would have been creeped out and reacted either negatively OR positively to this guy (depending on the dog) to ease their own tension.

I give a LOT Credit to my dog and his genetics. He stayed in a platz. He started back at the guy with intensity and then chose to turn away and ignore him and stare at me instead staying in a platz. Such a GOOD boy. His demeanor let me know that when he is older he might not be as tolerant of staring and he might read it as a challenge.

In another location I would have told the guy to back off and quit creeping my dog out. The issue here is I do not want the place to become dog UNfriendly (especially to MY dogs) as making a dog learn to take a chill pill is all training and this place is relatively quiet but has sufficient traffic to make it a challenge. It is also training to learn to ignore people who do what this guy did. This guy must have stood there for over 5 minutes.. bent over at the waist and staring at the dog. This is a bit over the top and verging on WEIRD.

Another time I will just get up and take the dog outside.

When I paid the cashier at the end they asked about my dog. I got to do a little heeling demo (again.. more training in a completely different place) and he was such a good boy snapping his but around on left hand pivots and so forth. He was impressive and I was surprised as well considering his age (and my skills.. or lack thereof at times.. as a trainer).

Thank goodness for good breeders and confident dogs with good genetics. That combo can make even me look pretty good!
 

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Good grief. That guy is going to stare down the wrong dog one day! Beau wouldve held his down in that scenario.....but he wouldve been up and in that guys face telling him off for it the second I allowed him to. It those kinds of people that get dogs in trouble. Ugh.
 

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That kind of bad human behavior gives dogs a bad rep. Not the dog's fault the stranger refused to listen to the dog's owner and back off when asked to do so. DO NOT pet, feed or otherwise interact with a dog without permission, or in situations where that is clearly what you are supposed to do, like at a dog park or dog social event.

Any one of my four would have growled to warn the human off, then snapped if the human didn't listen at that point and, I wouldn't have corrected my dogs for it - they are allowed their personal space from strangers just as I am. Don't like them, don't have to be petted by them. Dogs have good instincts, if they mistrust or dislike a person right off, there is a reason, even if we don't know the reason. Sometimes you need to trust your dog.
 

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I discussed this with my training partner and she said that I should NOT get up and walk away as it tells the dog the wrong thing (retreat). Instead I should tell the guy to back off as it is creeping my dog out. In fact, even tho he was being a good boy, I should have gotten up and gotten between the dog and the person and told him to back off.

This is a young dog and he is pretty impressionable. My telling the guy to back up or getting up so he does back up actually helps my dog to know two things:

1.) I have his back.
2.) WE are a team.

Both those things are important. I could have and should have handled this better. If the dog was older his reaction would likely not be so mild.

The scenario will present itself again in that place (the guy works there and I go there but not often). It will also present itself in other places..

Nalluh is a very pretty dog and (for a reason I have yet to grasp) people want to pet dogs they do not own. Apparently most of "the public" thinks all German Shepherds are black and tan with a black saddle. Nalluh is pure black. I had three people ask me we breed he was.
 

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Ugh, that's the worst!

It's crazy how people don't take you at your word that you know what your dog wants!

People do this with Mouse all the time. He's a pretty boy, but he doesn't want to be pet by strangers, but when he is sitting nicely as I tell people that he doesn't want to be pet people definitely think I am just a jerk who is depriving her pup of their pets.

It's no fun that this happened when you are in a service situation, so you can't just tell him to f off. I hope that he realizes how awkward what he did was and refrains next time!
 

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The guy was definitely creepy. That passive-aggressive thing he did where he talked to your dog about how mean you were would really irritate me.

I don't mind if people ask to pat my dogs, but I hate it when they act like a jerk if I say no. My AKK will bite if he feels threatened, and I've had more than one person tell me, "I wouldn't mind being bitten by such a cute dog" as they tried to push past me and stick their hand in his face. I've had a guy lecture me about how all dogs are friendly and I basically shouldn't project my feelings onto my dog. That didn't go over well.

I don't think it's weird that people want to pat a dog, though. I don't often do it myself (I'll ask at a show sometimes, especially if it's a breed I haven't met before or it looks super soft -- I patted an afghan hound and it was the nicest thing to touch), but I get it. Maybe the people can't have a dog of their own, or they're in my area for school and missing their dog back at home, or whatever. As long as they're nice about it, I don't mind. I let them pat my papillon because she has that good temperament where she's polite but mostly uninterested.
 

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I had a similar experience at a dog show earlier this month.
I was standing ringside with my fully done up standard poodle. It was quite windy out so my dog was a little up.
Suddenly, a guy who seemed to be with the shih tzus turned around and put his fingers on my dog's rosette with no warning!
I immediately shoo'd his hand away and told him 'Don't do that!'
What does he do? He immediately puts his hand right back on my dog's rosette! As I'm again shooing his hand away and telling him to stop he goes 'Oh I know not to squish them'. GRR.
Thankfully my dog is super even tempered and even being up he did not react to a stranger coming up from behind and without warning touching his hind end, which is very good cause we were about to go into the ring where he would have to be examined!
 

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I board dogs in my home and we always do a "meet and greet" to see how everyone, human and canine will get along. One owner seemed like a dream based on emails. Understood dog behavior and child/dog interaction. When they arrived, we went through the usual routine (take visitor into back yard and let dogs stiff through the fence of the dog run before introducing my dogs one at a time). I always let out my usually very submissive lab, Grace, out first, but within seconds, his dog was aggressively trying to dominate her, so much so that she turned and told his dog off.

I immediately separated the dogs, but his dog kept trying to get to Grace. I calmly explained that it would not work out. (any dog that does not get along with Grace WILL NOT get along with Abby!!!) He kept insisting that they just needed "a little more time" and let go of his dog, who tried to get to Grace again! I ended up gently grabbing his dog's collar and clipping on a leash. Then I let Grace stay loose in the back yard while I took his dog inside and quickly ushered them out the front door.
 

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I board dogs in my home and we always do a "meet and greet" to see how everyone, human and canine will get along. One owner seemed like a dream based on emails. Understood dog behavior and child/dog interaction. When they arrived, we went through the usual routine (take visitor into back yard and let dogs stiff through the fence of the dog run before introducing my dogs one at a time). I always let out my usually very submissive lab, Grace, out first, but within seconds, his dog was aggressively trying to dominate her, so much so that she turned and told his dog off.

I immediately separated the dogs, but his dog kept trying to get to Grace. I calmly explained that it would not work out. (any dog that does not get along with Grace WILL NOT get along with Abby!!!) He kept insisting that they just needed "a little more time" and let go of his dog, who tried to get to Grace again! I ended up gently grabbing his dog's collar and clipping on a leash. Then I let Grace stay loose in the back yard while I took his dog inside and quickly ushered them out the front door.
I would never board my dog (any dog) in a situation like this (loose with the owner's dogs).
 

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I would never board my dog (any dog) in a situation like this (loose with the owner's dogs).
This was not the point of my post, so I didn't think it was necessary to explain, but I NEVER leave dogs loose together! I have a large, shaded, outdoor, fenced dog run that is 20'x30' connected to an 8'x4' run inside the garage for MY three dogs. For visiting dogs, there are several options: a similarly shaded 10'x10' outdoor dog pen that's about 8 feet away from my dogs' run, a guest bedroom, or a multitude of crates to choose from. It all depends on what the owners want. However, I NEVER leave visiting dogs and my dogs loose and unattended.

When the weather is good, mine are out in their run and visitors are in their containment area. If it's above 90, below 40, or there are storms expected, all dogs are inside (mine in their crates and visitors in a crate or bedroom).

The ONLY time visiting dogs are loose with mine is if I'm present and able to pay attention.

I think your confusion is that we did the meet and greet in the back yard (it's as close to "neutral" as possible, because my dogs don't get to be out in the yard all the time.) but the dogs were leashed until the owner let his dog go.
 
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