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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hello I wanted some opinions as I am worried sick about anaesthetic.

We think our springer is about 12 or 13 (rescue). As far as I know he is healthy, just typical older dog arthritis but slim, bright and still walking 4 miles a day.

Would you go ahead with a dental at this age, as you can never be aware of all health issues?
 

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This is something that you really need to talk with your vet about. If you're noticing coughing, you definitely need to call your vet. Your vet will be able to evaluate your dog and point out any health issues that could cause problems with a dental cleaning. Vets are more than happy to discuss potential risks with you, and they are far more knowledgeable than a bunch of internet strangers who have never seen your dog before.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you. Yes I will speak with the vet tomorrow. I just thought the forum can help me feel less alone. I am not looking for an alternative to vet advice, just some thoughts from fellow owners to help organise my racing mind and be ready before my appointment tomorrow.
 

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If the problem with the teeth is more cosmetic or superficial, I probably wouldn't have a dental done at that age. But if the teeth are causing the dog pain, or the condition of the mouth is raising the risk of infection or heart disease, the dental procedure really just needs to be done. Are they doing pre-op bloodwork? I would definitely pay the extra or that, considering the dog's age.

You can mitigate some risk by having the procedure done by a team that includes a professional veterinary anesthesiologist.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Hello. Yes pre op bloods and fluids throughout. I am just worried that a new cough may be a sign of something which was not apparent before booking him in. Maybe I should ask to postpone? I am worried it could be the beginnings of heart failure…he just woke up honking / gagging again now, it’s been an issue occasionally for many years but only if he was playing a lot. It seems worse suddenly in the last 24 hours.

I would never forgive myself if I went ahead and I am worried the vet will brush over it and I will feel silly and thrn something happens.

I hate nights when you can’t be proactive.

thanks so much for replying.
 

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I can't answer your concerns regarding anesthesia on your dog any better than has already been said. But!! If you have concerns, a truly compassionate vet will absolutely, positively, NOT (say it louder for those in the back) NOT!!! dismiss your concerns or brush your fears aside. They will listen, discuss & weigh out the pros/cons with you before the procedure. If you feel 'silly' discussing very important decisions with your vet.... IMO, you need to find a different vet that will help you understand things & put your fears to rest (or, reconsider what the treatment plan for your dog is going to entail)

PS - Allowing your dog to be put under anesthesia is always something that causes us to thing very carefully & weigh out the various options. Is it scary? Yeah, it definitely is, but... if you trust your vet & have had an in-depth conversation about this, it's way less so.
 

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If the dog has suddenly begun coughing, etc, then I would definitely ask the vet for a follow up. It may be the coughing is caused by the dental issues and getting those resolved will be better than not.

It may also be a sign of something else going on and that could potentially be dangerous for him to undergo surgery at this point.

As @parus mentions, if the dog is healthy, not coughing, etc, I would base my decision on the impact of the teeth. My Mom had a policy that basic teeth cleaning was only done if the older animal needed to go under for an actual health issue. But if the teeth were abcessed, impacted, etc, then the dental work was deemed necessary to risk the anesthesia.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks so much everyone. I will go to the vet feeling much more in control now. I really appreciate your time and advice. luckily Dexter hasn’t needed the vet and had been extremely healthy, but age is catching up and I need the establish a trusting professional relationship for the good of my dog, which I will endeavour to start tomorrow.

thanks again everyone. It is 1.20am here so I had best get some sleep!!
All the best.
 
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