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Discussion Starter #1
Am I doing my 3 month old pup harm when I bring him with me most everywhere... Work every day, most family activities/outings, well, he comes with me unless I know that he would have to wait in the car, ie, grocery shopping. I do not want him to be spoiled. If that is even possible. I'm wondering if I should not be bringing him to work with me every day, give him alittle "alone" time? I dunno, I would just like some opinions about it.


Thanks,

Ana
 

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I don't know a whole lot about raising puppies because I'm more into the behavior/training of adult dogs, but I'd venture to guess that he DOES need some alone time or else you're setting yourself up for attachment issues. If not right now, then soon.

Can't you just leave him home, possibly crated, and run a short errand or two? Start slow, and then eventually as he's older the time will increase.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Yes, I fear that he is becoming a little protective of me and my children... and maybe he feels like one of them lol. But hey, I love him that much, short of the fact that he doesn't look like my other children, a bit more hair, lol. I will start with leaving him in when we do tball, and little outings. Tough love :)
 

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You won't hurt a dog by spending too much time with him, but rather by neglecting to teach him independence. Learning how to be left alone, without freaking out, is an important part of the training/socialization process.
 

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Hmmm if you are ALWAYS going to keep bringing him everywhere then I don't really see any harm in it. But if in a couple months, or a year you stop bringing him to work and on your outings it is going to be really terrible for the little guy. So I agree with the above, give him a chance to be happy and content being alone so that if things change in the future (maybe a new work place that wont allow him to come along) it wont be traumatic for him.

I must say, you have one lucky puppy! :)
 

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You won't hurt a dog by spending too much time with him, but rather by neglecting to teach him independence. Learning how to be left alone, without freaking out, is an important part of the training/socialization process.
And I would also question whether the problem behavior was reinforced by you (OP) or others.
 

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I don't think it's a bad thing to bring your puppy to work and social functions with you (as long as the dog is welcome).

My hubby grew up working in his dad's family-owned machine shop, they took their dog along and he would just lay around. The shop was named after him I think, Bear...it was cute :)

And at 3 months, if you leave him at home...I HIGHLY recommend using a crate for the pups safety.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
And I would also question whether the problem behavior was reinforced by you (OP) or others.
I am not sure what you mean by this. (I obviously know his problem behavior, which is being too protective) but I don't know what type of behavior would be reinforcing this...Can you explain?
 

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I am not sure what you mean by this. (I obviously know his problem behavior, which is being too protective) but I don't know what type of behavior would be reinforcing this...Can you explain?
The question would be: how do you handle things when he displays excessive protectiveness/possessiveness? Many problem behaviors develop (or escalate) as a result of owners unwittingly reinforcing them.
 

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Well, I handle it in a few different ways I suppose... First when he shows that behavior, I say his name, and say no, which usually makes him get back under my desk. If he continues, I usually pick him up and bring him to the person. Then if and when it continues, I put him in the fenced back yard to cool down, and the person usually leaves by the time he is let back in.

I am open to suggestions :)
 

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If he continues, I usually pick him up and bring him to the person. Then if and when it continues, I put him in the fenced back yard to cool down, and the person usually leaves by the time he is let back in.

I am open to suggestions :)
It depends on a couple of possibilities. If the dog is excessively possessive of you, then picking him up could present a problem. If the pup is reacting to others out of fear, then putting him out could be complicating things. Picking up the pup is probably not helping, in either case.

We could guess that it's this or that, but it's hard to say without seeing the behavior. Without more to go on, I would operate on the assumption it is a fear reaction. You could recruit some volunteers to approach you and the pup (without acknowledging him at all) and have the ringer drop liver treats as long as the pup is not barking or growling. Best to start out on neutral ground. At his age, it should be fairly easy to overcome, but it can also become "set in" and very difficult to deal with later.
 

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I would agree with previous opinions that it is important to teach your dog that he can function without you. You have kids, so perhaps you can imagine a parallell scenario: For the first few years of their lives, you are never out of their sight. You even sleep in the same room as your children. Then you have to go on a weekend business trip. Or you have an overnight hospital stay. Or your new beau wants to take you to Paris for a week. So you take the kids to gramma's house...and it's the most traumatic experience they have ever had because, as far as they are concerned, they can't live their lives without you.

If you think you may ever have to leave the dog alone for a bit, then you want to start getting him used to that feeling now!
 

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I have no problem with those here who say that your pup needs to learn to be by himself. If only because as he gets older, that will just be the case. And the earlier you teach him that it is OK to be by himself for a little while, the better it will be.

On the other hand, the more places you take your puppy, the more different people that he meets, the more different things that he experiences in a non-threatening way, then the more socialized he will become. That is an important part of puppy training as well - just as important as teaching him to be by himself.
 

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The question would be: how do you handle things when he displays excessive protectiveness/possessiveness? Many problem behaviors develop (or escalate) as a result of owners unwittingly reinforcing them.
If your 3 month old puppy is showing signs of protective/possessiveness, you need to up his training in a big way. Would probably be a good idea to spend some of that "together time" in dog training classes. :) I agree that puppy needs to learn to be comfortable alone as well. It is great that you have the option to spend so much time together though.
 

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I take two of mine with me everywhere that I can. They were starting to be a little "unhappy" when I COULDN'T take them- so now I occasionally will put them in their crates for a short period of time even when I am home (so they know that they can't be with me EVERY minute).
I like to have them with me and I don't see taking them along as a problem. They are very well socialized and have met a lot of nice people. When they can't go they have each other for company.
 
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