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Discussion Starter #1
Hello,

After reading Equinox's thread, I find that I am somewhat fascinated at everyone's response.

I was always told that 8 weeks is the prime age to get a puppy. With my mom's dogs, that's the age we used to bring the puppies home and I always thought that held true with any breed.

Now, I'm learning differently- so for a large breed is 7 weeks acceptable?

Why would a toy breeder hang on to the puppies longer?

Is it a breed thing?

:) Thanks for any responses
 

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I don't have any input here, but where IS Equinox?!?! She was supposed to go pick up Trent a week ago, but I haven't seen any posts here! I hope everything is alright...
 

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I have never heard of large dog breeders letting them go at 7 weeks either (reputable breeders that is). I have heard of quite a few who keep their pups as long as 10 weeks.
 

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I don't have any input here, but where IS Equinox?!?! She was supposed to go pick up Trent a week ago, but I haven't seen any posts here! I hope everything is alright...
I was thinking the same thing...either she is absorbed in all things Trent, or something is up...I'm hoping for the former.
Hopefully a thread with billions of pictures will show up sometime soon.
 

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I just sent her a PM, hopefully she will get an e-mail notification and fill us in.
 

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Most breeders that keep pups 10-12 weeks either have very small, delicate toy breeds that need to be with the dam/breeder much longer than usual, OR, a show breeder who is determining which pup to keep back. Around 3 months, the pup will be a miniature of what it would turn out as an adult ... hence those pups are kept back longer. My pet pups usually go around 8-9 weeks. I have sold a few pups as young as 7 weeks tho, and politically correct or not, have to admit they usually do adjust better. When I wait until 10-12 weeks to sell a pup it will only be because I have not fully decided which pup I want to keep back yet. Those pups do adjust of course, but seem to go through a rough patch at first. They have a harder time transitioning out of their old routine & switching over to the lifestyle of the new family. For pet purposes, 7-9 weeks is perfect to let a pup go. Dam usually looses a great deal of interest when teeth come in around 3 weeks. Not that she doesn't teach them afterwards - most do, but some just play around with their pups and not much else after they start eating/walking. Littermates learn from each other, yes, but can become rivals if left together too long. Especially same sex pairings. All the important lessons are taught by 8 weeks and at least one vaccination & several wormings can be administered by then so I don't see a problem with selling 8 week old pups. In fact I think it's better and try to avoid holding back pups to 10+ weeks as often as possible. JMHO.
 

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For pet purposes, 7-9 weeks is perfect to let a pup go. Dam usually looses a great deal of interest when teeth come in around 3 weeks. Not that she doesn't teach them afterwards - most do, but some just play around with their pups and not much else after they start eating/walking. Littermates learn from each other, yes, but can become rivals if left together too long. Especially same sex pairings. All the important lessons are taught by 8 weeks and at least one vaccination & several wormings can be administered by then so I don't see a problem with selling 8 week old pups.
IMO, vaccinations should not be started until 8 weeks, so that would be my preference for the youngest age a pup should be sent to his/her new home. :)
 

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For pet purposes, 7-9 weeks is perfect to let a pup go. Littermates learn from each other, yes, but can become rivals if left together too long. Especially same sex pairings. All the important lessons are taught by 8 weeks and at least one vaccination & several wormings can be administered by then so I don't see a problem with selling 8 week old pups. In fact I think it's better and try to avoid holding back pups to 10+ weeks as often as possible. JMHO.
As I have said before, this is not true across the board. Flatcoats are very slow to mature, mentally and physically, and my pups do far better if I keep them until 10 weeks. I don't know of many Flatcoat breeders, if any, that will let pups go at 7 weeks, and most keep them until 9 or 10.

We do not have any problems with littermates becoming rivals, pups attacking other pups, moms losing interest, etc. If anything, mom is still way too motherly, regurgitating the minute she sees her kids!

I think this is very breed specific.
 

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I know of a Pug breeder that I heard keeps all her puppies until they're close to 12+ weeks... That seems a little long to someone like me, but if I were really interested in a pug, I'd probably go through her. I think the longer the puppies stay with the breeder, and stay with each other, the more healthy they are all around; But that's just my opinion.
 

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I think it's breed specific and also depends on the state. In some states it's illegal to sell under 8 weeks. However, I know some good working border collie breeders that sell at 7 weeks. It wouldn't deter me from getting a pup from them if that was the only thing I didn't agree on.

Toy dogs are very small and tiny so they are generally held onto longer. I have not met a reputable toy breeder that sells dogs under 10 weeks. How long toy breeds are held depends highly on the dog. 10-16 weeks is the range I've seen.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
:)The reason I ask is just that most Samms seem to be let go a bit earlier then that- usually at the 7 or 8 week mark. I have met a few breeders who keep them a bit longer, but usually no longer then 9 weeks.

Thanks so much for the replies. :)
 
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