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Discussion Starter #1
I´ve noticed that sadly,alot of people have a breed bias and usually,it´s just a matter of them not being educated or because they had one or two bad experiences with a certain breed and suddenly,all said dogs are "bad".
The outlook people have on breeds like Pitbulls (I LOVE this breed) and staffys really bothers me,but the ones that bother me the most,and because it affects me personally,is the one people have about yorkies.

It bothers me when people say they literaly cannot stand yorkies because they´re "ankle biters","yappers" (I´m guessing they mean the high pitch sound of the bark?),"nippers",they´re "hard to train",that they´re agressive and bad with kids and that they have an "attitude"
...I often have to ask myself if they are talking about the same breed I´ve always owned and grown to love.All dogs bark,mine have always been fantastic with my kids (I have 3) and other people,and their "attitude" is what I love about them.Training? It´s never been a problem.
Infact,I think what bothers me the most are the insults..like "only gay men have small dogs" or "A yorkie isnt a real dog" (my husband has been called all kinds of names whilst walking our pups).I actually joined a forum a long while back where people refused to even aknowledge I was there because aparantly,yorkies are an embarasment to the species

I mean,I know all breeds have their traits,but as a rule it´s people who usually end up screwing up the dog,not the dog its self that´s so unbearable that no one would want to own it.

Have you ever heard someone say something about your dogs breed that you know through experience is totally wrong?
 

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I had a person tell me once that Lab's don't "DO" protection, and unless I was going to use one for hunting it was stupid to have one.

*points to my intro thread and the serial killer my Lab almost had for dinner as proof this is not true*

I also had someone tell me once it's impossible to teach one not to chew on *everything*. Hmm....my 5 month old puppy already knows what's 'hers' and what to leave alone. At least in the living room/kitchen....the rooms she has access to.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I had a person tell me once that Lab's don't "DO" protection, and unless I was going to use one for hunting it was stupid to have one.
Oh the hunting thing..I hate that one too! I had a pointer mix years back,and people kept telling me that she was "useless" unless we were planning on keeping her outside where she could kill birds o.0

I´ve heard something similar about Huskies.I´ve heard people say "Huskies are snow dogs,thats why they have polar bear coats..what good is a husky elsewhere??".
 

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I had a person tell me once that Lab's don't "DO" protection, and unless I was going to use one for hunting it was stupid to have one.

*points to my intro thread and the serial killer my Lab almost had for dinner as proof this is not true*
Um... a long time ago, I adopted a 3 year old yellow otter tail lab from my neice (RIP Bluto!). When driving home with him from VA to GA, I stopped at a rest stop on I-95. My young son and I were walking him down the sidewalk and had to pass by 3 men, that Bluto apparently didn't like the looks of. The dog literally shoved my son and I off the sidewalk, away from these men as we passed by them. He was staring at the men, almost daring them to come any closer. Remember, I'd just met and adopted this dog 2 days earlier - AWESOME!!
 

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I had pizza delivered last night. My pekingese had to go sniff the delivery boy's shoes. He asked what breed she was then he tells me that its chihuahuas you gotta watch out for. He said he owned a big dog and big dogs don't bother him.

I really don't have a breed bias, but my husband doesn't like big dogs, because he's had bad experiences with them as a child. Not sure what he considers big, but the three breeds he doesn't like are Great Dane, Golden Retriever, and Doberman.

I recognize there are breeds I'll never own, basically any dog with a high energy level, which is about every breed out there except the few couch potatoes. However I'm not biased, I think all breeds are great and kudos to those who have the energy to keep them.
 

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It's funny I am not a fan of Yorkies because of the one I grew up with. I have never understood everyones infatuation with them. The one my mom owned was mean and hated everyone and smelled something awful. I don't hate the breed and don't go around insulting people because of it, but I would never own one.

I also grew up with a Samoyed in Florida and looking back although he was an inside dog, it had to be awful for him when he was outside. But that doesn't mean you can't own working or sporting breeds as pets.

I have mutts and it's hard to tell what is in them so no one has ever really said anything about their breed. I did have a BC owner one time tell me I was lying that my dog was a BC/Hound mix. I agree he is tall and colored like a hound but that dog's ears are all BC and he has other traits of the breed. If she wasn't having to scrape her dog off the floor because it was so scared I might have been offended.

After I adopted my first dog and found out he was a Catahula mix I panicked a little. I had never heard of the breed and after researching I was worried I was going to have this aggressive out of control dog that needed exercise I couldn't provide.

I think a lot of breed bias that doesn't come from a "dangerous dog" angle but more the "you shouldn't own that breed because" is because a lot of Herding, Sporting and Working breeds were bred to do a job and most pet owner's don't understand the amount of exercise and stimulation needed to keep these breeds purely as pets.
 

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I hate when people dislike a breed because they have met examples that are aggressive or badly behaved. I'd be willing to bet those traits are not in any breed standard. :/
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I really don't have a breed bias, but my husband doesn't like big dogs, because he's had bad experiences with them as a child.
My husband is the same.He´s not affraid of big dogs though,he just isnt fond of them.I adopted a Great dane mix (he was ill with Corona) and at 5 months old,he was H U G E! After he died,he (my husband) knew that we wouldent adopt another big breed :(
I LOVE big dogs,but I cant just grab my keys and go out every time my dogs want to pee.I have 3 kids and leaving the house quickly just isnt an option,so potty pads are a must and with big dogs,it doesnt work like that.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
It's funny I am not a fan of Yorkies because of the one I grew up with. I have never understood everyones infatuation with them. The one my mom owned was mean and hated everyone and smelled something awful.
It´s funny that you say he smelled..yorkies have a single coat that is very similar to human hair..infact,my dog allergic friends have no problem around my yorkies and they dont smell even when wet.Maybe your mums yorkie had a skin condition? Ear mites? (one of our past yorkies had an ear infection that made his head smell awful until he was cured)
I am super sensitive to smells (especially animals) which is one of the rasons I love this breed lol.When wet,they dont smell any different than a persons wet hair,and when dry,they smell great :D
 

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Have you ever heard someone say something about your dogs breed that you know through experience is totally wrong?
People tend to think poodles are frou-frou dogs who prance around, but don't do any real doggy things. I was proud of my girl when she raced around the dog park - leading a pack of boxers and labs. The other people at the park said they had no idea poodles were so athletic. Given the chance, I honestly believe she'd make a huge dent in the crow, squirrel, and rabbit populations in our neighborhood.
 

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Poodles. The bias against poodles as frou frou fluffballs only fit for old ladies and gay men makes me very angry. Poodles are fantastic all around dogs well suited to any activity you might want to engage in, including hunting. They're also wonderfully loyal and quite protective. They're the perfect pet for most dog owners, coming in 3 sizes, and most people will laugh if you suggest a poodle.
 

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It´s funny that you say he smelled..yorkies have a single coat that is very similar to human hair..infact,my dog allergic friends have no problem around my yorkies and they dont smell even when wet.Maybe your mums yorkie had a skin condition? Ear mites? (one of our past yorkies had an ear infection that made his head smell awful until he was cured)
I am super sensitive to smells (especially animals) which is one of the rasons I love this breed lol.When wet,they dont smell any different than a persons wet hair,and when dry,they smell great :D
I am pretty sure he was a puppy mill dog and that is why he smelled. He had lots of health issues.
 

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Poodles. The bias against poodles as frou frou fluffballs only fit for old ladies and gay men makes me very angry. Poodles are fantastic all around dogs well suited to any activity you might want to engage in, including hunting. They're also wonderfully loyal and quite protective. They're the perfect pet for most dog owners, coming in 3 sizes, and most people will laugh if you suggest a poodle.
I know what they groom them the way they do but I don't think it helps the general public's opinion of them being fru fru.
 

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I know what they groom them the way they do but I don't think it helps the general public's opinion of them being fru fru.
In some ways, it would be nice if poodles could be shown in a sporting or retriever clip in addition to the continental and English saddle clips.
 

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Poodles. The bias against poodles as frou frou fluffballs only fit for old ladies and gay men makes me very angry. Poodles are fantastic all around dogs well suited to any activity you might want to engage in, including hunting. They're also wonderfully loyal and quite protective. They're the perfect pet for most dog owners, coming in 3 sizes, and most people will laugh if you suggest a poodle.
This ^ ... ^ ... ^ is so well stated ... just what I was thinking. :)

I used to be bias to Poodles. Having had two Poodle mixes in my life now that I am older ... I wasted way too many years not having Poodle/mixes in my life! The mixes are wonderful dogs! If purebred Poodles are anything like my mixes ..... I will probably have a purebred Poodle before I die. XD

Now being much older ... IMO .... a dog is 90% what the owner makes it. I love all dogs.

EDIT: I forgot to mention that I was bitten by a Dachshund while I was riding a bike as a child ... still love all dogs. :) All dogs can bite ... the little ones are just quicker! Lol! :)
 

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I can honestly say that if I consider it, there are no specific breeds that I am biased against. I've had negative experiences with several different types of dogs. I was bitten by a GSD when I was 3 or so (my fault, I stuck my hand through the fence), we had a neighbor growing up who had some sort of lab mix that would chase us if he got off leash and once nipped my brother on the shoulder...I could go on and on. Now, I can say there are probably some breeds that annoy me (poodles and yorkies immediately come to mind), but I'd never completely discount owning a particular dog of a certain breed based on that or any other negative experience I may have had. It doesn't seem fair to the dog. Even though I will admit that bully breeds make me uneasy, I know that is the fault of the owners that I've encountered who have encouraged their dogs to act aggressively for "protection" (I can spit in any direction in my neighborhood and hit someone with a Pit bull-type dog).
 

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I have no breeds that I dislike/fear, but there are many that I wouldn't own. I very rarely announce which ones I wouldn't own because I don't want to hurt anyone's feelings. I will admit to using more caution when approaching when certain breeds, but for the most part, I let the dog stand as an individual.

My worst extended bite came from a "bassador." It took maybe 15 long seconds to get the dog off of my arm. Fortunately, the dog grabbed and held and didn't rip me up much. I don't hold it against the breed combination. I didn't particularly hold it against the dog. I was totally safe hanging with him. I just couldn't touch him. I wish they would have mentioned that before I started the "grooming" portion of a pre-screening for therapy dog class! (never mind the question of WHY someone with a known aggressive dog enrolls the dog in a therapy dog class!!!!!! Please be real about the dog you own!)
 

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There are all kinds of dogs I have no desire to own, because they would be a bad fit with my personality or lifestyle, but that's about my extent of bias.

However, I get a lot of gruff from other rat terrier people about Jack. Apparently, because he's a rat terrier I shouldn't bother expecting anything of him - because he's a terrier. ...Um, No. How about I expect some minimal standards of obedience training and then you don't act shocked that he's got a good recall, mostly solid stay (in progress) and is safe off-leash.

The biggest thing that gets me is the breed I wanted, and was going to get before Kylie showed up, was a Springer Spaniel. I can not tell you the number of stories I heard about Springer Rage. Except the supposition was they ALL have it and why would I do that? ...I'm still getting a springer some day. I just am. Unless I switch to a herding breed. Who also apparently all have attitudes. Or a rottie - which will eat my family for lunch.

(People are just weird.)
 

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When I was a kid/teen I've was bitten by a St. Bernard, Doberman, Chow and more than one Pekingese. I don't worry too much about St. Bernards and Dobermans since they're pretty good about telegraphing their intentions. Chows and Pekingese still make me nervous since they always seem ready to snap and are hard to read.
 

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Yeah I've been asked by a few people why on earth I would want a Kelpie/Australian Shepherd/Border Collie mix if I wasn't intending to do any kind of sports or herding with him.. like, who cares? He doesn't "need" to be a working dog, or a competitive athlete to show off his skills..he's plenty good at showing off his athleticism on a daily basis with our routine lifestyle.. He gets regular 5 km runs, walks at the dog parks, hikes, swims A LOT, plays fetch with balls, frisbee's, and has gotten pretty damn good at herding all the flies in the yard. I may enter him into a dock dog competition when another one comes up this way, but still that is more so just for fun and to do something he's good at and loves to do (jumping off docks into the lake to retrieve his ball/frisbee)

Cash's breeder often says I should just enter him into sheep herding trials, so that it teaches him to only herd sheep and not other animals or things, but he doesn't really have a herd drive, and in fact he's quite timid with any animal larger than him.. he doesn't chase other animals or people, the only thing he chases are toys or bugs. We attempted agility classes a while back but Just couldn't commit to it with all our other extra curricular activities and busy lifestyle, and he seems to be a perfectly content dog and is an excellent house pet even with his constant high energy, he easily entertains himself when we are not exercising him, he is not demanding what so ever nor does he get destructive if he's bored, so he's good proof you CAN own a high energy/herding/working breed without all the classes, or tons of vigorous exercise and still have a great house pet :)
 
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