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We are picking up a dog today and I bought a crate yesterday and put it in the basement. We plan on feeding him there, though I was wondering where we should put him when we are gone. Should we just crate him or put him in an empty spare room? In a few years we would like to have kids so that room would turn into a kids room. Would it be better to start him on the habit of using the crate down stairs or just let him use the empty room? Any cons to letting him use the empty room? The floor is laminate and easy to clean.

Also, he is currently crate trained.

Regards,

Hostage
 

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I'd crate him in the spare room to start with and then do some "test runs" with him out of the crate in the spare room for a short time to see if he's destructive or has any issues. If he is fine for 30 minutes say, work up to a few hours over the course of a week or so and then he could start staying loose in the spare room with his crate door open. Since you're talking several years before kids, if he can safely be left loose, it will be comfortable for him to have more space and you can have room to put a dog bed and leave water for him more easily.

I think crate training is a good thing, but if you have a dog-safe room and the dog is well behaved, I much prefer giving a dog some stretching space once they're ready for it.
 

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The crate should be in the main part of the house, not a basement. Put it in the living room, den, diningroom, bedroom or the spare room. Put it somewhere where he can access it when he wants a safe place to go to.
 

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I agree about not having the crate in the basement. Dogs are very social, and like to be with the rest of the family. AND, crates do give dogs a place to go if they feel overwhelmed or stressed.

I'd also suggest, if you end up letting him roam free in the spare room (providing he's not destructive) that you block the door to the spare room with a baby gate rather than close the door all the way. Many dogs feel isolated and anxious behind closed doors, and you certainly don't want to encourage him to be anxious in his new home.

A baby gate across the doorway of the spare room will confine him without isolating him.
 

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We only get like 4 - 5 hours every evening with our dogs, the 8 hours spent sleeping is like free bonus bonding time... I like my dogs to sleep in our room. Putting him by himself, in the basement is setting him up for a lot of behavior problems the rest of his life.
Confining him to the kitchen during the day makes all the sense in the world... but when you're home, he really wants nothing more than to be with you!
 

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We only get like 4 - 5 hours every evening with our dogs, the 8 hours spent sleeping is like free bonus bonding time... I like my dogs to sleep in our room. Putting him by himself, in the basement is setting him up for a lot of behavior problems the rest of his life.
Confining him to the kitchen during the day makes all the sense in the world... but when you're home, he really wants nothing more than to be with you!
I agree, plus with people too often it is "out of sight, out of mind". Dogs need to be near their people as much as possible.
 

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Just to be contrary, my dog does not sleep in our bedroom. After the dog is trained and trustworthy, I don't think that he needs to sleep close by, only within hearing distance, so he can hear you, and so that you can hear him whine to go outside, if needed.

The reason my dog doesn't sleep with us is b/c he talks and runs in his sleep... He makes more noise barking and yipping while he's asleep, then he does while awake. And, sometimes it's funny to 'listen' to him dreaming in the other room...
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Well the first night we found out that it would be best for both parties involved that he sleep in the same room with us. The first night I got very little sleep more that I was worried than anything. The second night was great and when we woke up, he made an usual bark that almost seemed like he was saying, I need to go potty.

Between my fiance and I we are only gone for about 8 hours a week, only two days a week at the same time. Then gone for a few hours. He does seem to have some seperation anxiety. If I go to the bathroom he will jump on the door, so I am going to crate him. Though I am now considering where to put the crate. He tore up a blanket I put in the crate and the one I put over it.
 

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Don't assume that he actually has some separation anxiety just because he is upset when you're away from him. True separation anxiety usually is pretty severe and includes drooling, scratching the doors or crate until the paws bleed, barking/crying until they're hoarse, peeing/pooping all over the place (out of anxiety, not because of lack of potty training).

It's most likely NOT separation anxiety, but rather nervousness in his new home. Right now, you and your fiance are his security blanket. He's afraid and upset about the new home, and he having you there is comforting to him. So, when you have to leave, even just to the bathroom, he freaks out a bit, not knowing if you're coming back. As he settles in, he may grow out of being upset when you're gone.

It's important for him to learn to be independent. One way to do that is to give him something to do when you need to be away from him. Try giving him a bully stick or a frozen, stuffed kong. That way, he has something yummy to keep him busy while you go to the bathroom or do a few chores.

I think I remember that the dog is older, not a puppy, right? Depending on his past, he may or may not do well with crate training. If his previous owner abused the use of the crate, and kept him in it too long, he may be afraid you will do the same. OR, on the other hand, if he has never been in a crate, it may freak him out. So, he may take a bit of getting used to it.

But, yes, crating or confining him is a great idea when you need to do something. Just try the bully stick or kong, to keep his mind off of you being gone.
 

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Get a crate with a divider.

My Dog hates being in the spare room and will sleep happily in his crate.

Each is different though. :D
 
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