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Agreed with the above. It's very normal for adult dogs not to be 'dog park dogs', and that's okay. Especially when it comes to "thunderdome" style dog parks where there's limited space and the only activity is interacting with other dogs. It gravitates dogs to each other and doesn't give them space to avoid each other if you have a personality or play style clash. As group activities go, something structured like parallel walks/play (where the dogs are walking or playing with their owner, near but not interacting with another dog) or an off-leash hike tends to work much better for adult dogs.

And, sadly, it does matter that you have a bully breed mix. The sad truth is that these dogs are both boisterous, physical players that often clash with other dogs' play styles, and are apt to be blamed for any altercation that happens. Whether it was their fault or not. They're currently the bugaboo 'aggressive breed' of the dog world, despite loads of research and statistics showing that they don't cause any more bites than any other breed, which means they get less social leeway in group situations. It sucks, but it's important to protect your dog by being careful with who they interact with.

Personally, I use dog parks pretty much as a training tool (where I'm outside and the other dogs are inside, so I can work with my dog-reactive dog without worrying he'll get rushed by loose dogs), or when they're completely empty so my boys can go stretch their legs. I've used them in the past, mostly with my eldest dog, and frankly I think they're partially responsible for his poor dog-dog social manners today. He gets overstimulated and overhyped, pushy, and snarky and stops listening to other dogs' signals. Recipe for a disaster, especially with a smaller dog, because he'll start fights and I'm worried about who's going to finish them.

Pre-covid, we did arrange co-walking groups around our local trail park, which I think was much more successful and socially healthier for many of the dogs who attended.
 
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