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Discussion Starter #1
Really need to cut down on the coffee, it's making me think too much!

I'm working out some of the basic details of the website, and figuring out wording...

Co-owning each pup with the new owner until they are spayed or cleared for breeding, both with AKC and CKC (they are in the misc class with CKC so have to be AKC reg'd first) to save hassles and allow showing in the US if things work out.

Having my name on the microchip information as a second owner/conctact? I know someone who didn't like that idea, but honestly if a dog gets lost or dumped and I'm the breeder, I want to know and have the right to the dog as a co-owner.

Picking the pup, the sex, the colour unless the owner has a specific 'heck no' response in the application - how do other breeders handle that situation since they have no control over what colours they do get (with goldens and wiems it's not that difficult!).

Requiring the owners to commit to training for the first 2 years - I see a lot of people take one set of puppy classes then stop, then at three the dog is a nutcase. I know there's not much I can do other than maybe the dog remains on a co-own with me unless that's done.... asking too much? They are border collies..... not bassets (no offence to bassets...).

Requiring owners earn at least one title by the age of 2 - this could be as easy as a herding instinct test (one hour, $50 bucks) or whatever. Trying to avoid the lawn ornament people, can you tell?

Suggesting an alternate vet care schedule with me knowing the results - so (as an example) instead of booster shots at 2, they do hip xrays and get ofa numbers, at 3 bloodwork for thyroid...... and anything else that might come up with my lines so I have a good idea of what I'm doing/producing.... I don't want owners to vaccinate the heck out of the dogs anyway, so having a 'do this' plan...

That's about it. Feel free to comment or suggest other things or ideas!

I don't want to be sooo picky that I don't get many homes, not that I'd have need for a ton, but still. I'd like to have really, really good homes and avoid the ones where the dog gets ignored by the time it's six months.
 

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This is all IMHO only ....

Not a breeder ... but from reading what may become your contract it seems to me that actual people who are serious about giving a dog the perfect home and life should have no qualms about your expectations.

What about when people move ... should they always leave a forwarding address? Just because the micro chip is in both names ... couldn't they still skip town regardless? ... just a random thought. Of course I guess you take that chance no matter what you do to safeguard a pup/dog IRL. :/
 

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Picking the pup, the sex, the colour unless the owner has a specific 'heck no' response in the application - how do other breeders handle that situation since they have no control over what colours they do get (with goldens and wiems it's not that difficult!).
I like it when breeders give you choice in what color/gender you want. I don't want a male, and if the breeder would only offer a male to me I would likely go to a different breeder or wait for another litter. I am looking at AKKs right now and I know I want a black and white, blue or brown eyed(no partis) female. I wouldn't want anything else, and it would irritate me if a breeder tried to shove a grey and white parti eyed male down my throat.

Requiring the owners to commit to training for the first 2 years - I see a lot of people take one set of puppy classes then stop, then at three the dog is a nutcase. I know there's not much I can do other than maybe the dog remains on a co-own with me unless that's done.... asking too much? They are border collies..... not bassets (no offence to bassets...).
I have problems with this one too, I don't think classes are necessary personally. Especially because we don't have one within a couple hours of here (conservative estimate). Some owners are perfectly capable of training their own dogs outside classes, even BC's.

Requiring owners earn at least one title by the age of 2 - this could be as easy as a herding instinct test (one hour, $50 bucks) or whatever. Trying to avoid the lawn ornament people, can you tell?
This get rid of all buyers that want pets or people that want working ranch dogs. Again, there isn't anything like that (test wise) here short of at least a 2 hour drive, more likely more hours, and then you have to open your schedule up for that particular day.
I know you are trying to find only the best homes for your pups, but you are really limiting them to performance homes that are within close proximity to shows and towns with classes and don't care about the color/gender of their puppy.

Everything else seemed reasonable to me.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
They could skip town totally, but as far as I know (going to check on that) the microchip would still list me as a co-owner. So unless they moved, the dog got lost and they got the call and got the dog first, I'd hear about it. If the dog got lost and they didn't claim it, then I'd hear about it. I think it would also give me the right (have to check) to bail the dog out of a shelter if required.

It happened to a friend who is a breeder, the dog got out of the yard, the owner figured he could 'learn his lesson with jail time' and let him sit for the weekend, and the breeder couldn't go get the dog. But then again, I don't want to be paying an arm and a leg because the owner ran up a ton of tickets, so I'll have to figure out the 'what ifs' of that one. I don't expect it to be a huge issue, and asking them at the age of 2 to have hips cleared instead of just vaccinating seems reasonable. I am guessing the vet would give a discount for having all the dogs come in at the same time for their xrays too.....
 

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Your intentions are awesome and admirable.

I think you can screen potential owners using those criteria and weed out/scare away alot of people who you dont want owning a dog. Enforcing certain requirements like committing to training for two years (seems a bit long--I would think 9 months of training would be enough to teach any reasonable human how to handle and train a dog) and earning a title are going to be difficult. How are you going to enforce those requirements and what action will you take if they are not met? Are you going to lay out a detailed plan of action and remedial steps to take if they end up failing to meet your requirements? Will you ultimately repo the pups and give refunds if one of the progeny dont earn a title by the age of two for example? How much time are you willing/able to invest in each pup and owner in order to help them meet your requirements?

I like the way you think. I just don't know how you would go about enforcing your requirements after someone makes a purchase. But then, I've never entered into a purchase agreement for a blue blooded dog so I have no basis on which to make a judgement and could be talking out the tail end. :) Just MHO.

Ron
 

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To be honest, all that would scare me away. The only one that I am okay with is the one where the breeder can pick the best puppy for me.

ETA: You can't protect your pups from everything unless you keep them. I like breeders that will talk to you without so many requirements and will get an idea of what kind of owner you will be from the conversations. There comes a point in which you have to trust in your puppy buyers imo.
 

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KodiBarracuda - if it was an amazing home that said 'I want a blue dog with purple eyes, nothing else' then I'd certainly work towards that. If it was a 'we can't get there to see you in person till two months from now between soccer and dance classes with the kids and there's no way we'd be able to do classes....' then they can go elsewhere. I would of course try to make things work with people as much as possible but would keep in mind the home and that I can't promise I won't end up with ten black and white boys with five people wanting merle girls. Certainly a consideration.

Training is based on this area - there are a ton of classes going on in everything, and even if they are in nearby areas, there's a lot of contacts and things they can do. Nothing is set in stone and yes, some people can train the dogs themselves but it doesn't hurt for them to take a class or two either and get out there. I am flexible with these things but for the average pet owner who says 'oh I want a border collie' I want them to have the idea that they're going to have to get off the couch. Same goes for titles, there's lots to do here and around. I'm assuming most puppies would go around her locally (I'd prefer it!) so going with what's here. If an owner can't make a day to take their dog for a herding test, perhaps camping in the area and we'd meet them there, then there's lots of border collie breeders around who would sell them a pup without even asking for their address.

As for ranch dogs, most of the ones that are ranch dogs here are not well treated or housepets that work, they are stock and the typical ranch owner isn't going to want a 'show' border. Not that I'm ignoring instinct, Ticket (if I use him) has worked sheep as a youngster and I might do more with him, he's from working lines, and Kilt will get her feet in manure as well to see what she's like. Agility and rally are more of what I'm interested in, along with conformation, and most of the stock dog breeders around here will not sell to a home that will participate in CKC events (some ban ALL dog related sports other than herding).

Not wanting to get into the 'working dogs ruined by conformation' thing, if someone was a great home and wanted a pure working ranch dog, I know of a few other breeders I'd be comfortable refering them to. None that do all the health testing I'll do, but still reasonable people and breeders to work with.



I know you are trying to find only the best homes for your pups, but you are really limiting them to performance homes that are within close proximity to shows and towns with classes and don't care about the color/gender of their puppy.

Everything else seemed reasonable to me.
 

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To be honest, all that would scare me away. The only one that I am okay with is the one where the breeder can pick the best puppy for me.

ETA: You can't protect your pups from everything unless you keep them. I like breeders that will talk to you without so many requirements and will get an idea of what kind of owner you will be from the conversations. There comes a point in which you have to trust in your puppy buyers imo.
I agree - I think you might miss out on some fantastic owners. Not everyone - people and dogs want to compete. One of mine is show quality but hated showing hence we got her when she was 1 yo as we don't show. In the beginning I had house visits from the breeders and when we went around to meet them they asked for our dogs to come too. Seeing them healthy, well behaved and happy in their skin said loads... We are contracted in many things i.e. no breeding, let them know if we move, if we -for some reason can't keep them - they want them back, etc... I do have a hurdle as far as living in a city but how horrible if I was completely overlooked. We are great friends with all the breeders of our girls.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks guys!

I realize that really, I have no control once a pup leaves here. Legally someone could hand the pup off to a puppy miller and I'd have nothing I could do unless they wanted the papers. And I do trust people or I wouldn't consider breeding.

I have seen much more strict requirements from breeders, one that I didn't like was the pups had a full vaccination at the breeder's house at six weeks, owners were expected to have a vet vaccinate again at 9, 12 and 15 weeks, with the all in one vaccine cocktail, AND provide a copy of such to the breeder for each one. Too much for my comfort level.

Some of the things I've put will likely be more of a suggestion, I can't make them do it all but would likely lean towards the homes that are willing to do more of course. But then again I don't have to give them a full refund if they've done zero with the dog and then complain about behavior issues, etc. I won't do a 'replacement puppy' contract deal either but will likely take each situation as it happens, if it happens. Some of the application questions will help weed out things too, I will ask if they're willing to do a home visit to see their home, but not sure I'd feel the need to do so by the time I've gotten to know them. If they aren't willing to let me see their home or find that too 'nosey' then that's fine too, not likely the person I'd want to have a puppy go to.
 

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First, I want to say it's great that you're gathering so much information about your audience / potential buyers. Second, I can tell that you care deeply about all your dogs - current and future. Based on my experiences on reading this and other dog forums, talking with breeders, and knowing a little bit about border collies, I absolutely understand why you've outlined the requirements above. I can also say that my "no BS" husband would balk at just about everything, yet he'd be a wonderful dog owner.

I'm not a breeder (and never plan to be), but in searching for our puppy, I learned a great deal about breeders and their rationale for certain requirements. I can share my thoughts based on my recent experiences.

Really need to cut down on the coffee, it's making me think too much!

I'm working out some of the basic details of the website, and figuring out wording...

Co-owning each pup with the new owner until they are spayed or cleared for breeding, both with AKC and CKC (they are in the misc class with CKC so have to be AKC reg'd first) to save hassles and allow showing in the US if things work out.
How does this differ from limited registration? That's what we have with Katie. Our contract stipulated that she would be spayed by 6 months (although the breeder kept telling me to wait until she was closer to 12 months) and, obviously, she wouldn't be bred.

Having my name on the microchip information as a second owner/conctact? I know someone who didn't like that idea, but honestly if a dog gets lost or dumped and I'm the breeder, I want to know and have the right to the dog as a co-owner.
Our breeder required this, but my husband resisted. I understand the breeders' position - she does not want her dogs to end up in a shelter or rescue - and having her listed on the microchip helps to ensure an abandoned dog is returned to her. My husband, I suspect, can't fathom the idea of abandoning a dog and thinks that listing a local secondary contact would result in a faster reunion should something happen. I ended up listing my MIL as second contact because the breeder never answered my inquiry about what phone number to use for her.

Picking the pup, the sex, the colour unless the owner has a specific 'heck no' response in the application - how do other breeders handle that situation since they have no control over what colours they do get (with goldens and wiems it's not that difficult!).
For the most part, I agree. I've read enough to know that, in general, the breeder is better equipped to make appropriate matches. However, the owner may have a valid reason for a preference. We have a female; our second dog will be male as a mixed gender pairing is generally recommended. Of less importance is color. For example, I absolutely did not want a light colored poodle, so I actively sought breeders of blacks and browns. I'm not sure how color genetics works in BCs, but with poodles, most breeders have a pretty good idea of what colors will result from a specific breeding.

Requiring the owners to commit to training for the first 2 years - I see a lot of people take one set of puppy classes then stop, then at three the dog is a nutcase. I know there's not much I can do other than maybe the dog remains on a co-own with me unless that's done.... asking too much? They are border collies..... not bassets (no offence to bassets...).
I understand this, but I would approach this on an individual basis. If you educate and screen buyers, they should know what they are getting into with a BC. I'd work with potential owners on a plan that works for both of you. Maybe one family would do advanced classes and agility; another might do a basic class, but have the knowledge and experience to continue training independently (perhaps agree to a specific training goal and schedule); yet another family might take a basic class, but then have a specific job in mind that will occupy their dog. I know you said you intend to sell locally, but that may not always happen. I live in a fairly populated area, but am having a difficult time finding advanced training classes locally. What if there are limited / no classes available? How much would you work with owners to find appropriate activities?

Requiring owners earn at least one title by the age of 2 - this could be as easy as a herding instinct test (one hour, $50 bucks) or whatever. Trying to avoid the lawn ornament people, can you tell?
I've seen breeders who offer a rebate of sorts to buyers who title their dogs. That option encourages owners to work with their dogs, but isn't as overbearing as requiring may appear. Or, could you work with a local breed club to make it easy for owners to participate in their events? (I'll admit I don't really understand how dog events work, so this may not be applicable.) What about owners who don't have access to events? How much will you help find an event or will you modify this requirement?

Suggesting an alternate vet care schedule with me knowing the results - so (as an example) instead of booster shots at 2, they do hip xrays and get ofa numbers, at 3 bloodwork for thyroid...... and anything else that might come up with my lines so I have a good idea of what I'm doing/producing.... I don't want owners to vaccinate the heck out of the dogs anyway, so having a 'do this' plan...
This is really more of a benefit to you and, I suspect, a substantial expense for the owner. If you can get a vet to give a discount, that would help. What about clinics through local breed clubs (I think several of the poodle clubs in my area offer some type of screening tests at a discount). Also, are you willing to deal with the vets who insist on annual vaccinations? Again, a personal example, I very often find myself caught between following my breeder's advice and the vet's advice. It's uncomfortable and I'd love to have "backup" for my preferences.

That's about it. Feel free to comment or suggest other things or ideas!

I don't want to be sooo picky that I don't get many homes, not that I'd have need for a ton, but still. I'd like to have really, really good homes and avoid the ones where the dog gets ignored by the time it's six months.
Do you have a puppy application yet? If you ask the right questions (e.g., describe a typical day with your dog, describe your ideal dog, what are your plans for your dog, how will keep your dog physically and mentally stimulated), you might be able to identify families who would be amenable to the requirements listed above or find a way to individualize a plan that will work for everyone.

Good luck! From everything you've written, you sounds like a fabulous breeder!
 

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I'm no breeder but I can give tips from what I've seen and what I like
Co-owning each pup with the new owner until they are spayed or cleared for breeding, both with AKC and CKC (they are in the misc class with CKC so have to be AKC reg'd first) to save hassles and allow showing in the US if things work out.
I actually like when it says they withhold papers until proof of spay/neuter is presented for pet homes. As for the co-ownership for showing - if it's a new person to the breed I would probably like to see the breeder remain on as co-owner regardless of clearances. It's an added insurance as the person would most likely come back to you for mentoring and for your help on finding a dog/bitch that compliments their dog/bitch for the breeding. You know your lines best. (the breeder I'm looking at offers a small refund of money that you put towards the puppy if you show proof of spay/neuter by 6 months of age)

Having my name on the microchip information as a second owner/conctact? I know someone who didn't like that idea, but honestly if a dog gets lost or dumped and I'm the breeder, I want to know and have the right to the dog as a co-owner.
I like breeders that do this.

Picking the pup, the sex, the colour unless the owner has a specific 'heck no' response in the application - how do other breeders handle that situation since they have no control over what colours they do get (with goldens and wiems it's not that difficult!).
Most breeders I've seen/talked to will have on their puppy questionnaire a few questions about the potential buyer's preferences towards coat and eye color and sex. (for pets) they'll match puppies to their buyers based on personality and suggest to the buyers what puppy would be best suited to their family - but we'll keep the coat/eye color options open and they'll also allow the buyers to "pick" on their own if they really like a puppy that isn't what the breeder suggested - but only as long as the puppy they pick isn't reserved to another buyer. Even for show quality dogs - from what I've seen the breeder will pick the puppy for you (not really a choice in that matter - unless you absolutely hate a specific color they MIGHT bend on that) unless the breeder knows you've been in the breed for a long time.

Requiring the owners to commit to training for the first 2 years - I see a lot of people take one set of puppy classes then stop, then at three the dog is a nutcase. I know there's not much I can do other than maybe the dog remains on a co-own with me unless that's done.... asking too much? They are border collies..... not bassets (no offence to bassets...).
A better thing than requiring a training commitment for such a long period is to reimburse the buyer for doing things like this. I haven't talked to any breeders personally that do it - but I read that some breeders, as an incentive for their puppy buyers to take their puppies to classes, will pay back the cost of the classes. i.e you take your puppy to a 6 week puppy K course at $100 - at the completion of the course the breeder will give you (the buyer) $100 to cover the fee of the course. I like this idea. But I don't like a breeder putting in my contract that I HAVE to take TWO YEARS of training - I would turn away from that in a heartbeat especially if I lived in an area that a training facility/instructor was an hour away (unless you only plan to sell to people in your area)

Requiring owners earn at least one title by the age of 2 - this could be as easy as a herding instinct test (one hour, $50 bucks) or whatever. Trying to avoid the lawn ornament people, can you tell?
As a pet buyer...No. Especially, again, if doing these things requires quite a bit of traveling because they aren't available in the owners area (unless you're only selling to people in your area). I think by putting too many requirements (even if they're small like this one) you'll lose out on a lot of quality homes.

Suggesting an alternate vet care schedule with me knowing the results - so (as an example) instead of booster shots at 2, they do hip xrays and get ofa numbers, at 3 bloodwork for thyroid...... and anything else that might come up with my lines so I have a good idea of what I'm doing/producing.... I don't want owners to vaccinate the heck out of the dogs anyway, so having a 'do this' plan...
I don't know if I would require ALL of that - especially on a pet owner. Many people don't have the money to do all of the routine testing a breeder does - it's not a cheap hobby. You could somehow work it into the contract maybe for people that wouldn't mind doing it - so you have the numbers as a reference for your next breeding or if there is ever a repeat breeding done you could say "well - their last litter produced pet dogs that had X, x and x graded hips scores that went to pet homes and x and x scores that went to show/working homes" etc what have you.
 

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Very well said - all the breeders I know have a fantastic gut feeling of good homes... and I think being human... but I would never spay or neuter a dog at 6 months and any breeder that said this I would walk away....
 

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I really want to have my own BC within the next year or year and a half so I've been doing some heavy internet stalking of BC breeders. So I'll throw in my two bits based on what I've seen and what I want.

Co-owning each pup with the new owner until they are spayed or cleared for breeding, both with AKC and CKC (they are in the misc class with CKC so have to be AKC reg'd first) to save hassles and allow showing in the US if things work out.

I'm not sure I follow. Does the co-ownership end when the dog is speutered? I would be okay with co-owning a potential breeding dog, however, I'd want a pet/performance dog to be mine. I see no reason for co-ownership in pet/performance.

Having my name on the microchip information as a second owner/conctact? I know someone who didn't like that idea, but honestly if a dog gets lost or dumped and I'm the breeder, I want to know and have the right to the dog as a co-owner.

Again, I'd be okay with the breeder listed as a contact on the microchip but I don't want to feel as if I'm losing the rights to my dog via co-ownership.

Picking the pup, the sex, the colour unless the owner has a specific 'heck no' response in the application - how do other breeders handle that situation since they have no control over what colours they do get (with goldens and wiems it's not that difficult!).

I'd prefer that my breeder pick the pup for me on the condition that it will be female. They know the pups better than I do. They have more experience than I do. So I trust that they can pick the right puppy for my home.

In my favorite breeds, color doesn't make much of a difference to me. It seems like most breeders ask for the preference and give the option of passing over a litter in hopes of getting the right pup in future litters.

As long as the puppy picked for me is a good performance prospect and female, I will be a happy camper.


Requiring the owners to commit to training for the first 2 years - I see a lot of people take one set of puppy classes then stop, then at three the dog is a nutcase. I know there's not much I can do other than maybe the dog remains on a co-own with me unless that's done.... asking too much? They are border collies..... not bassets (no offence to bassets...).

This might be unreasonable for pet homes.

Personally, I feel perfectly capable of training a puppy through the CGC and socializing them better than any puppy K class could so I might skip those altogether. Though I would be enrolling in agility foundations for a pup and getting into more serious training when she matures. Still it feels like... micromanagement.

I like some of the ideas about rebates listed above.


Requiring owners earn at least one title by the age of 2 - this could be as easy as a herding instinct test (one hour, $50 bucks) or whatever. Trying to avoid the lawn ornament people, can you tell?

The CGC is a title and that's a cake walk for many dogs. That doesn't mean you've dodged the lawn ornament dog owners.

Suggesting an alternate vet care schedule with me knowing the results - so (as an example) instead of booster shots at 2, they do hip xrays and get ofa numbers, at 3 bloodwork for thyroid...... and anything else that might come up with my lines so I have a good idea of what I'm doing/producing.... I don't want owners to vaccinate the heck out of the dogs anyway, so having a 'do this' plan...

I would be happy to relay OFA results and what have you, however, I will vaccinate as much as my vet suggests.

That's about it. Feel free to comment or suggest other things or ideas!

I don't want to be sooo picky that I don't get many homes, not that I'd have need for a ton, but still. I'd like to have really, really good homes and avoid the ones where the dog gets ignored by the time it's six months.
IMO, you're going to drive a lot good homes away in an effort to protect them from everything. I would love to breathe down the neck of every home I ever adopted a foster dog out to but it's just not reasonable. In that situation, I settled for the occasional email and that they return the dog to me if they cannot keep him/her.

Talk to prospective puppy buyers. Visit them, have them visit you, etc. Build a relationship. Learn about their background with dogs, how they rear them, what vet they use and get references, etc.
 

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You hit the nail on the head with how I was feeling Tofu_pup. Micromanagement was the perfect word. I know in my next puppy, I don't want "big brother breeder" watching my every move. I mean its my dog dagnabbit and I will decide how much training it needs and which shots/tests it gets. If you feel comfortable enough with me to sell me your puppy, you should be comfortable enough to let me make the executive decisions.
(not you as in the OP, but you as in my next puppy's breeder whoever that may be.)
 

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Really need to cut down on the coffee, it's making me think too much!

I'm working out some of the basic details of the website, and figuring out wording...

Co-owning each pup with the new owner until they are spayed or cleared for breeding, both with AKC and CKC (they are in the misc class with CKC so have to be AKC reg'd first) to save hassles and allow showing in the US if things work out.

I honestly don't understand co-owning. Even for a show and breeding prospect but I can at least sort of see why in those cases. For a pet home though, I wouldn't touch a "co-owned" dog. Yes, I would be happy to keep in touch with the breeder and provide friendly updates but once I buy something, it is mine

Having my name on the microchip information as a second owner/conctact? I know someone who didn't like that idea, but honestly if a dog gets lost or dumped and I'm the breeder, I want to know and have the right to the dog as a co-owner.

Depends on how many contacts the databases allow. I would want my cell phone and info to be first contact and someone local and reliable second. If the breeder was very local, it would be okay but even a couple hours drive and I'd want a better local contact

Picking the pup, the sex, the colour unless the owner has a specific 'heck no' response in the application - how do other breeders handle that situation since they have no control over what colours they do get (with goldens and wiems it's not that difficult!).

Color, no big deal and the personality should be far more important and I'd let the breeder pick for personality. Sex however, no, if I want a female dog, a male dog is not an appropriate substitute. Particularly if my household already had a dog with same-sex aggression or issues

Requiring the owners to commit to training for the first 2 years - I see a lot of people take one set of puppy classes then stop, then at three the dog is a nutcase. I know there's not much I can do other than maybe the dog remains on a co-own with me unless that's done.... asking too much? They are border collies..... not bassets (no offence to bassets...).

Training for 2 years?! Do you mean regular classes that whole time? Or just to be a active in training or what? I'd happily agree to a puppy or CGC type class but training after that should be my prerogative. There are many ways to get good training and socialization outside of formal classes (which cost money and are scheduled at particular times and might be a distance from the owner). For example, I provide continuing training to Chester a few times a week one-on-one and provide socializing via friends dogs, foster dogs, dog events, monthly pack walks etc. Some dogs need more formal training, some owners are more experienced than others, but in the end, it should be up to the owner to decide what suits their dog and their lifestyle. For example, if someone works nights or swing shift, it is nearly impossible to find a formal group class at a good time.

Requiring owners earn at least one title by the age of 2 - this could be as easy as a herding instinct test (one hour, $50 bucks) or whatever. Trying to avoid the lawn ornament people, can you tell?

Meh, not going to avoid the lawn ornament people with that anyway. What's the point of it otherwise? (For pet homes that is). Maybe someone wants a dog to run with and can provide a great home with plenty of exercise, why should they drop money on something that doesn't apply to their needs?

Suggesting an alternate vet care schedule with me knowing the results - so (as an example) instead of booster shots at 2, they do hip xrays and get ofa numbers, at 3 bloodwork for thyroid...... and anything else that might come up with my lines so I have a good idea of what I'm doing/producing.... I don't want owners to vaccinate the heck out of the dogs anyway, so having a 'do this' plan...

For a breeding prospect, sure. For a pet dog or show (non-breeding) dog, why force the owner to spend more money and put the dog under for the x-rays? Bloodwork, no problem as its simple and inexpensive

That's about it. Feel free to comment or suggest other things or ideas!

I don't want to be sooo picky that I don't get many homes, not that I'd have need for a ton, but still. I'd like to have really, really good homes and avoid the ones where the dog gets ignored by the time it's six months.
I think you have to talk to people and take each home as an individual case rather than trying to micromanage them. Have a solid contract that allows you to take back a dog in case of neglect, provide a refund once the dog is spayed/neutered (a nice chunk of change will be a good motivator - charge more upfront, give more back) and ask nicely to keep up with the dog and owner later via email or facebook or such. Potential breeding prospects maybe are different, but for pet homes, a good caring owner is enough, they don't have to be "perfect"
 

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In addition to other great remarks here, I particularly agree with those regarding alternative vaccinating/testing schedules and titling.

To the first: You are not the vet. I would think you would prefer owners who will listen to their vet, to those who would listen to a breeder. I'm sure you've done research but you are not a vet, you do not have the degree.

To the second: You seem to be discounting the possibility of having low-drive, or otherwise disinterested pups. Yes, they are border collies, but the reality is you are breeding show dogs, not working dogs, and even if you were: You are going to have some, probably in every litter, who are not cut out for even flyball/agility/obedience. Requiring the owner title the dog is unrealistic for several reasons, but chief among them that all of your puppies simply are not going to be prospects for any kind of ring. It just does not work that way.
 

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To be honest, I think your heart is in the right place, and as many previous posters have said these ideas aren't bad, just unrealistic. It seems to me you're trying to keep a hold in every aspect of the dogs' lives once they leave your home, but honestly I would never buy a puppy from a breeder that seemed to want to control it's entire upbringing even after they chose to sell me their dog. When I buy a puppy I expect it to be fully mine. I don't want a breeder hovering around trying to micromanage what I do with my own dog. Once it reaches this level, I feel more like I'm paying you for the privilege of raising your dog for you.
 

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Co-owning each pup with the new owner until they are spayed or cleared for breeding, both with AKC and CKC (they are in the misc class with CKC so have to be AKC reg'd first) to save hassles and allow showing in the US if things work out.
This would be a reasonable request. However, if you want every puppy to have an AKC title, most AKC competitions are exclusive to purebred dogs that meet the breed standard, and most require that the dogs are unaltered, as the purpose of AKC competitions are generally to evaluate the quality of breeding stock. You might want to lower your expectations if you expect every single puppy to not only be perfect breeding stock, but to be a competition standard dog. Some dogs just aren't suitable as competition dogs, which is why they earn titles and not stickers that say "good job."

Having my name on the microchip information as a second owner/conctact? I know someone who didn't like that idea, but honestly if a dog gets lost or dumped and I'm the breeder, I want to know and have the right to the dog as a co-owner.
Microchip companies do not allow multiple owners or contacts. Most will only allow a single contact number. This one is also a little controlling. If you would like all of the puppies to be properly identified by the breeder, the standard method of doing this is through a tattoo, i.e., a permanently inked number that traces directly back to the breeder and lineage. This will ensure that if any puppies are found by a shelter, they will be able to contact the breeder.

Picking the pup, the sex, the colour unless the owner has a specific 'heck no' response in the application - how do other breeders handle that situation since they have no control over what colours they do get (with goldens and wiems it's not that difficult!).
I don't think it is unreasonable for you to refuse people who want to choose their dog based on appearance. However, I know that I would not personally even consider adopting a dog if I was not allowed to choose the one that I wanted. I would turn around and walk away if I decided that I liked a particular puppy and the breeder told me that I was not allowed to choose, I had to take the one that he gave me. This is not reasonable, unless you are selling the puppies online, which might not be a good idea if you have such high standards of care.

Requiring the owners to commit to training for the first 2 years - I see a lot of people take one set of puppy classes then stop, then at three the dog is a nutcase. I know there's not much I can do other than maybe the dog remains on a co-own with me unless that's done.... asking too much? They are border collies..... not bassets (no offence to bassets...).
Training classes generally last a few weeks, not years, so it is not a reasonable request that the owners commit to two full years of training. Requiring that they put their dog through a Puppy Socialization and Training Class and Basic Obedience, on the other hand, is a great idea.

Requiring owners earn at least one title by the age of 2 - this could be as easy as a herding instinct test (one hour, $50 bucks) or whatever. Trying to avoid the lawn ornament people, can you tell?
Again, AKC titles are usually only available to breeding stock, so if any of the puppies do not qualify for AKC registration, they might not be able to compete in title competitions. I think that, rather than a competition title, the dogs might be required to pass a Canine Good Citizen Test. This is a better indicator of properly socialized and trained dogs. On the other hand, just because your dog can pass a herding instincts trial, does not mean that they are properly behaved dogs, but rather they just have natural herding instincts.

Suggesting an alternate vet care schedule with me knowing the results - so (as an example) instead of booster shots at 2, they do hip xrays and get ofa numbers, at 3 bloodwork for thyroid...... and anything else that might come up with my lines so I have a good idea of what I'm doing/producing.... I don't want owners to vaccinate the heck out of the dogs anyway, so having a 'do this' plan...
The standard vaccination schedule for dogs is a DHLPP shot series beginning at 6 weeks (started by the breeder), not two years of age. Puppies must also be vaccinated for Rabies and Bordetella. Without these vaccines, dogs are susceptible to disease, and will not be permitted in any training class, and cannot go to the dog park or any other public place with a high volume of dogs without the risk of contracting a disease. Take it from anyone who has had a dog that contracted Parvovirus or Distemper. DHLPP vaccines really are necessary. However, the need for annual booster shots varies upon the individual dog. Some dogs develop the full antibodies after the initial vaccination, others never develop natural antibodies to these diseases. This is why vets recommend that you vaccinate your dog every year, since without extensive testing they have no way of knowing whether the vaccines are still effective. The likeliness of the dog dying from the vaccine is much lower than their chance of dying from a contagious disease, hence why they vaccinate dogs in the first place. I think x-rays, blood work, and testing of hormone levels are great ideas - but for YOU to test them yourself, not leave this expense to the new owners. These procedures are usually done to the breeding pair before allowing them to mate, not done on the puppies after they are born. If you aren't confident that your dog's have solid lineage and good genetic health, you shouldn't be breeding them in the first place. It is, on the other hand, reasonable for you to request that your dogs have vet check-ups every 6 months, since they are only about $50 for a standard exam.

Edit: Regardless, I think it's unreasonable to request that all dogs be titled, since some dogs simply aren't cut out for rally, competition obedience, agility, or herding. They might just not have the skills, patience, or work drives to compete. Just because your dog is a purebred Border Collie doesn't mean they are cut out for herding cattle. In fact, Border Collies are somewhat known for aggression towards small animals, and even in herding competitions, it is not uncommon to see a few of the dogs behead the livestock rather than herd it into a pen. Of course it results in immediate disqualification, but it just goes to show that not all dogs are suitable as working dogs. Just because Border Collies are supposed to be good at herding, Labradors are not supposed to eat the duck instead of bringing it back, Golden Retrievers don't usually get shot in the face running after the bird before the owner has shot it, or Basset Hounds aren't supposed to run blindly in the opposite direction of the tracking scent, doesn't mean that any of those statements will prove themselves to be true. Having a "pedigree" doesn't mean that all of your puppies are going to be perfect specimens of their breed.
 

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The only AKC venue that requires your dog to be intact (and a purebred) is conformation. The AKC also lets mixed breeds compete in Rally, Obedience and Agility through the Canine Partners program. But any dog registered with the AKC can compete in any of their venues (spayed/neutered obviously can't do conformation - and also no dog with limited registration can do conformation - regardless of spay/neuter. But a dog with limited registration can still do any of the other events)
 

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I think the two years of training is way overboard.

I'm not sure what type of titles you expect every puppy you breed to earn. I know with what most of my breed is involved in, titles are pretty hard to earn. Most go as working dogs, so they are not going to go to puppy classes, or compete for a title.

I have no problem keeping my pups from going as lawn ornaments, just by interviewing the buyers. Though pet quality pups are just pets.

I also would not buy a dog with a co-owner. When I sell, if there is a reason they are not breeding quality, the contract holds them to spay.

The health testing... I don't see many doing.this unless they plan on breeding. I know most of mine are not sold locally. It honestly would be impossible to keep up and enforce the contracts. Trusting who purchases the pups is my goal. I have kept in touch with each puppy/dog's owner I have sold.

Picking.the pup for the home is best. To a point. The buyer should tell you what they are looking for, and you can best match that within two or three pups usually. You can also refuse certain pups to some homes.

I had a man insist on a female pup, who needs to be doing some sort of bite work. This home is not going to deal with this hard pup. He wants an airscent dog. He didn't like my choices, and didn't buy a pup, since I wouldn't sell the one he wanted.
 
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