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Discussion Starter #1
I have Bentley were he will leave the treat on his nose but won't snap it up. He drops his head, lets it fall off his nose and then eats it,lol. If I through a treat to him he will jump up and catch it, but not if it is on his nose. Is there a way to train him to through the treat up himself and catch it? My aunt got her pit bull to do it and it is neat. Bentley is a fast learner and I am trying to think of different things to teach him and this is one I thought of. He got the "leave it on nose" part down in about 10 minutes. He isn't really food motivated, although he loves it, he likes his toys better. So that has been the hardest part in finding something he is interested in. I found he has a love for cheese and it doesn't fall off easy so it has been working.
 

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Use a very tiny toy on his nose. :) Like a bar-bell squeaky type toy ... easy to balance.
 

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Some suggestions.

If your dog is limber enough, you can start with his head oriented more vertically, so his nose is pointing upwards as opposed to horizontally. This may encourage him to 'snap it up', initially. Then gradually move towards a more horizontal position. Variation: tilt head sideways a bit and place the treat more on the side of the muzzle rather than directly on top of the nose, to begin with.

Also, it will help if you can prevent your dog from self-rewarding incorrect responses (eating the treat from the ground). Working with the dog sitting on an elevated perch will allow you, yourself, to easily retrieve the treats which are not snapped up.

Yes, cheese or meat or something similar is a good choice to use, since it's slightly sticky and can be cut into a flat shape that's conducive to balancing, unlike for example, semi-rounded kibble. Perhaps even one of those small, traditional milk bone biscuits could work.


With one of my past dogs, I cut a slice of bologna into long thin strips, then just tucked one end of the strip into the dog's mouth and draped the other end over top of the muzzle, before releasing him to 'slurp' it up. This worked well as a basic starting point in his particular case.

EDIT:
So that has been the hardest part in finding something he is interested in. I found he has a love for cheese and it doesn't fall off easy so it has been working.
Sorry, re-read your post and I'm slightly confused. If the cheese has actually been working, then why not stick with that for the time being ?
Is it possible to teach him to balance and flip a favourite toy ? ... just to build the neccessary mechanical skill AND ENTHUSIASM, then transfer that same skill and enthusiasm to using a food treat.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
He likes cheese but he doesn't have a drive for it as he has for his toys. he also gets "tired" of a treat and I have to switch it up regularly. I will try and find a toy.
 
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