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I wanted rats very badly, as it's almost my birthday, but mum asked me what it is that appeals to me, and I said it was because they're small, cuddly,and the like. She said since she isn't partial to rats that if that was what I wanted we could get another dog<33

This excited me, a dog is always my favorite pet, but I didn't know she would let me get one.

I want a small breed that likes to play but is also content to be petted sometimes. I know all puppies are playful, so I'm prepared for that.

I don't want anything mega-large, we have 2 (well trained) dogs (one black lab mix, i guess, she never really turned into a lab xD and then a golden retriever-cocker spaniel mix.)

the goldie/cocker spaniel mix is male and was fixed, the lab-ish isn't fixed yet but we have a date set next year to get it done. our vets is very good but it's a small office and they have many appointments :O

anywayss, I know I could fit time for a new pup into my life, ptty training, getting et acclimated, walks, playtime, etc because I'm responsible with my time and I have a lott of free time on my hands.

btw, I'm 12, but I'm bery good with animals and such. I've owned a bird, a few guinea pigs, and a few dwarf hamsters, all which have outlived their lifespan by awhile. I clean cages as often as need be and am prepared with an emergency stash of cash for any emergency vet things.

i was googling and saw pocket beagles, and fell in love with them. but I'm not sure if this is the right choice.

here's what qualities I need.

  • not alot of shedding, mum doesn't want a lot of hair to clean up
  • is good with kids, i have many cousins (note that I would be sure ears/tails aren't pulled, the dog isn't violated in any way)
  • enjoys both playing and cuddling/petting
  • would work well with a medium sized and a large sized dog (both are very sweet and will accept a newcomer)
  • won't jump to kill small rodents, I might get a hamster or soemthing in the future (I wouldn't be placing the cage open on the floor, for pete's sake, but I don't want a dog that will immediatley go to kill.)
 

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I'd stay away from the Rat Terrier if you intend to get a hamster; their primary purpose in life is to hunt rodents. Actually, I'd stay away from all Terriers. They can be loyal & affectionate, but they're working dogs at heart, and not really suited to being cuddled by strangers - particularly children.

What about a Shih-Tzu? They're small, moderate energy, affectionate, and low-shedding.
 

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Just to let you know, there's really no such thing as a pocket beagle. There was once such a thing in the 14th and 15th centuries, but they are no longer legitimately bred today.

The "pocket beagles" that you see on the internet and in newspapers are poor quality puppies bred just so irresponsible breeders can make money. They are produced by bad breeders who just breed runts to runts. In the end you get a litter with poor health and temperament, that are sold to customers for big bucks as cute, miniature beagles.

Good breeders should breed to the AKC breed standard, which call for beagles to be either 13" or 15" at the withers.

When you buy a pocket beagle from an irresponsible breeder, you support an irresponsible breeder who is steadily worsening the dog overpopulation problem... The majority of "pocket beagle" breeders do NOT conduct the relevant genetic tests on their dogs, which also makes for a more unhealthy puppy.

Edit:

Sorry, I also wanted to add a couple of things... Beagles are great with kids and other dogs when raised the right way. However, they shed a lot, and they are very bad with small animals. They were bred as hunting dogs and as a result they instinctively chase and kill any animals they see as prey. This includes rabbits, cats, chinchillas, hamsters, guinea pigs, etc.
 

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Stay away from 'fads' such as pocket beagles, they are VERY poorly bred and riddled with health problems not to mention over priced. I'd suggest the Pug, mine has been an excellent companion for my daughter since she was 6 years old (she's now 12), they're sturdy, clownish, and have wonderful temperaments and though they can have health problems (mostly stemming from their flat faces), most can be avoided by finding a good breeder. If you're low on cash and don't mind an older pup, they can often be found in Breed rescue. If you'd like I can give direction to a good breeder as well as rescues for most any breed you're interested in.
 

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Terriers in general are energetic and so they aren't that great with small children. And short hair dogs shed just as much as long hair dogs just shorter hairs. Actually a lot of short hair dog shed year round while some long hair dogs only shed heavily a few times a year.
Toy sized, "hound" breeds I don't really know of any. I would recommend a dog like the toy poodle or bichon frise. Personally, I like shiba inu and american eskimo dogs. They are still small dogs but not quite that small. American eskimo dogs can be toy sized. Pugs are good and my friend has a "puggle" a pug/beagle mix.

All that said, I would say adopt a dog from a shelter. Shelters have pure bred dogs but mutts can be just as adorable as a pure bred dog and you never know, you might just find a mix that perfect for you. They aren't all old dogs. I've seen puppies as young as 2 months at my local dumb friends league up for adoption.

Puppies raised around small children should be good with kids but puppies need more attention. Despite your good track record, I would recommend that with multiple pets, adopt an adult dog.

You can always look at and play with the dogs at the shelter to see if any fit what you're looking for. New dogs are available for adoption almost every day at a big shelter.
 

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Stay away from Puggles or any other so-called designer breed unless you get one from a rescue or shelter. Like the so-called Pocket-Beagle they are overpriced, most often poorly bred puppies. No responsible or ethical breeder intentionally breeds mutts.

Check out the AKC website and the sites for the National breed clubs for any breeds that interest you. You'll find a wealth of accurate information that way. A few breeds that came to my mind were Cavalier King Charles Spaniel, Toy Poodle, Maltese, Pug, and English Toy Spaniel.
 

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I'd suggest you look at getting a Papillon. I'm not a toy breed kind of person (I like them fine, I'd just be concerned about breaking one), but after seeing member Laurelin's picture threads, I suspect a Papillon may somehow appear in my house at some point. They are typically ranked among the smartest breeds of dogs (with poodles, the only toy breeds in the top 10) right up there with the top retrievers, workers, and herders. Intelligence rankings usually put a higher value on "trainability" than IQ--IMNSHO.

There's just something about those little furballs that is hard to resist.
 

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Like others said there is no such thing as a pocket beagle anymore and it's sad when I see people trying to sell these so called "pocket beagles" because you can normally tell by looking at them that they have stunted legs and don't always come in the standard beagle colors because they have been bred with other breeds of small dogs. They normally aren't even full beagles. Anyways...

I would suggest getting a poodle or possibly a papillon. They are both loving and highly intelligent dogs, but can sometimes take longer to potty train from what I hear. As long as you are willing to work with the dog and do crate training this shouldn't be an issue. I can't say much for the papillon as I haven't owned one yet. I will be picking him up next friday. I have been reading a lot about them though and really think they are the right breed for me. If I were you I would definately start looking up a few different toy breeds that interest you and just read up on them to find out which is best for you and your family.

Also for the shedding. Poodles do not shed much at all, but require monthly grooming. Papillons tend to shed quite a bit...so just putting that out there.
 

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I think it would be a great idea for you and your mom to visit a few local shelters and check out the small dogs they have! A dog's personality is individual, you can't say all beagles are good with children, all bulldogs are lazy, etc. However, when you go to the shelter, you can meet individual dogs and get a feel for their unique personality. Also, there are no other dogs that are exactly the same as a shelter dog! They are so unique, with their own looks and stories. Plus, there are so many wonderful dogs in need, you'd be doing a great thing by saving a life!

Also, there are plenty of puppies in shelters if you've got your heart set on a puppy. Be careful, though, that you check out the breed and ask how big it may get! I've seen tiny 5lb lab puppies grow to be huge!! Lol!
 

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I'd suggest the Pug, mine has been an excellent companion for my daughter since she was 6 years old (she's now 12), they're sturdy, clownish, and have wonderful temperaments and though they can have health problems (mostly stemming from their flat faces), most can be avoided by finding a good breeder. If you're low on cash and don't mind an older pup, they can often be found in Breed rescue. If you'd like I can give direction to a good breeder as well as rescues for most any breed you're interested in.
I'd agree that Pugs would be a good fit except for one thing. The OP mentioned that her mom wants a low shedding dog, and that is definitely NOT a Pug, lol. They shed ALL the time. We sweep several times a week and our floors still have a fine layer of Pug hair more often than not. I think personality wise, Pugs would be a great fit, but they definitely are very heavy shedders.
 

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If grooming is not a prohibitive factor, I would definitely suggest a toy poodle. They are definitely fun, and mine has great fun romping with my other dog who is twice his size, so bigger dogs aren't usually a problem.

Good luck with your decision and let us know what you choose. :)
 

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I'd suggest you look at getting a Papillon. I'm not a toy breed kind of person (I like them fine, I'd just be concerned about breaking one), but after seeing member Laurelin's picture threads, I suspect a Papillon may somehow appear in my house at some point. They are typically ranked among the smartest breeds of dogs (with poodles, the only toy breeds in the top 10) right up there with the top retrievers, workers, and herders. Intelligence rankings usually put a higher value on "trainability" than IQ--IMNSHO.

There's just something about those little furballs that is hard to resist.
My world domination plot is working! ;)

Seriously, they really are good dogs and I am totally not a toy dog person yet I've managed to have 6 so far. The concerns I'd have with ANY toy breed (paps included) are the big dogs. Are they gentle enough for a dog so small? I know many people that have large and small dogs and it works fine. (I will hopefully soon be one of them since I'm planning on adding a much larger dog) Paps are sturdy for their looks but I would never leave a big dog and a small dog out unsupervised. I know that's common sense but it's something I wouldn't chance and thought I'd mention it.

Also, papillons DO shed. Sometimes I've seen them listed as non to low shedding but they do shed. the good news is they don't shed nearly as much as a double coated breed and they don't need much grooming. But we do have quite a few white hairs floating around the house.

But other than that, they vary a lot within the breed. I have one couch potato papillon that would be fine just hanging all day and one that is a turbo dog and always on the go. The other two are in between leaning towards the energetic side. They are HIGHLY intelligent dogs. I can't say that enough. I've had shelties, retrievers, and a GSD and I think the paps and GSD have been the smartest. They are usually pretty trainable but they get creative sometimes and can be good problem solvers. They are also very sweet personalities and very social. Everyone is their new best friend. Overall they're just fun happy little dogs. They really just want to do what you're doing and be involved with it.

My 11 year old sister has a papillon and they're great together. Mine also get along fine with my chinchilla with supervision. My oldest papillon is terrified of the chin though!

Other breeds I might suggest are bichons, poodles, shih tzu, and maltese. Of course they all need grooming regularly.
 

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Not going to lie...I was totally going to suggest a Papillon too.

I think a good Cavalier could also fit the bill!
 

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My world domination plot is working! ;)

Seriously, they really are good dogs and I am totally not a toy dog person yet I've managed to have 6 so far.
I have to admit - every time I see your signature, I think of the Hitchcock movie, The Birds.

I also think that getting crushed beneath the weight of a couple hundred Paps might not be the worst way to go.
 

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Oh! If you don't mind hair that is low shed and just needs brushing, a Havanese could also be awesome! They are LOVELY little dogs!
 

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Ha, it matched me with a Basset, a Shih Tzu, a Bulldog, a Norfolk or a Llasa. The only one I'd consider from that list is the Bully.
 

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I got:
Black and Tan Coonhound
German Shorthaired Pointer
Rottweiler
Kuvasz
Sussex Spaniel

The Rottweiler is the only one I'd consider (Heck, I'm pretty sure I'm going to get one xD), MAYBE the GSP...everything else is a NO!

Can any of you see me with a Black and Tan? LMAO!!
 

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I didn't actually say that I would own the dogs the quiz recommended. I simply said I felt they were accurate choices. Just because a particular type of dog would fit my lifestyle doesn't mean I'm going to like it enough to own it...and just because I like a dog enough to own it doesn't necessarily mean it fits my lifestyle all that well!
 
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