Puppy Forum and Dog Forums banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
98 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi- I love my dog but a/I am not an experienced owner and b/puppy is a little dim.

My concern is her complete lack of fear of busy roads. If she ever gets away (again, my mom fell with her last week and she was lost briefly), she has no hesitation about traffic

Can anyone offer a simple routine I can do to train and forever the rest of her life reinforce the need to stay out of traffic?

Thx
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,927 Posts
Tofu_pup gives good advice.
You could try this too: Invisible barriers
Give your puppy some credit, might not be as dim as you think....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,367 Posts
I've never seen a dog who was sharp enough to realize on their own accord that two tons of rolling steel could possibly hurt them. That is, not unless they've already experienced the consequence of being hit once or twice. I think all inexperienced dogs could be classified as "dim" in that regard, if that's the way you wish to define it, although I would advise against it.

Yours is not unique by any means, but he is special. Refer to him as a "genius" often enough and he will eventually become one. Promise. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
We had issues with our three dogs running outside the yard and to goodness knows where once they got outside the garage without a leash on. We have a large kennel attached to the back of the house so they can be outside anytime they want. But we bought one of those wireless fences from TSC. That is a lifesaver for us. We got the more expensive one that gives them a vibration warning if they get to close and it also has 5 "shock" levels so you can find out which one your dog needs. It's the stubborn dog PetSafe one.
http://www.tractorsupply.com/petsafe-reg-stubborn-dog-in-ground-fence-trade--3690197
This has saved us a lot of frustration on chasing down dogs that get out because they used to like to run once out. They only got shocked a few times before they learned what that vibration means. Now they run in the yard and don't even get close enough to get that vibration warning and they are a joy to have outside with us when we are out with them to supervise. Because we do have dogs in our neighborhood that do come into our yard once in a great while. We don't want an issue with other dogs should that happen so they are never out alone. Which is why we have the regular tall kennel fence in the back yard.

I know many are anti-shocking products but this has worked wonders for our dogs and after the first few shocks they learned. We still keep the collars on just in case they get a wild idea to run, but they don't. But they sure do love it when the collars come off and the harness goes on for a regular walk for exercise!

I really like this because when I come home from shopping I can leave the doors open and the dogs can run in the yard as I go in and out bring my purchases in the house without having to worry about the dogs taking off down the street.

The receivers for the Stubborn Dog are rather large especially on a small dog, but our 12 lb dog doesn't have issues with wearing hers. But we liked this version better because the regular (cheaper) version I believe didn't offer a vibration warning and only offered one maybe two shock levels. We felt the vibration warning was VERY important to give them a chance to turn around before it got the shock. One of our dogs has the lowest shock setting, one is in the middle and the medium sized dog is at the top.

I hope you find a solution since I'm not sure you can teach a dog to avoid walking in the streets when you talk them for a walk for exercise along the edge of a street. Our small town doesn't have a lot of sidewalks and many are cracked so most people walk along the curb around here.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,849 Posts
Puppy isn't dim at all. How are dogs supposed to know they can get hurt by cars? It's like expecting a toddler to automatically know when the stove is hot or not to play with a knife. Invisible barrier or fence is a good idea if you live along a road.

I know how scary it is. One of my dogs is an escape artist. Last time she got out, she ran across 4 lanes of busy traffic. Twice. I was literally running in the road, waving at cars to slow down.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,946 Posts
Your dog is not dim, and dogs generally don't naturally come with a fear of large moving objects. The (debatably) smartest breed out there, the border collie, often chases moving vehicles in an attempt to herd them.

This is a management issue. As a dog owner, it is your responsibility to keep the dog leashed around roads until you have a solid recall.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top