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I live in Australia and last year our summer reached 44 degrees celcius which i believe is about 112 Fahrenheit. anyway I was working at the local vet at the time and everyday about 4-9 dogs would come in with heat stroke, out of this number on average 2/3 were sled dog breeds, eg huskies,malamutes and samoyeds. about 4 of those dogs died that week, whereas all the shorter haired and even golden retrievers with a longer (but very much thinner coat) pulled through. The vet said that it should be illegal for hotter climates to own sled dog breeds, as she sees so many die each summer, and it's not from negligent ownership, 99% of the time it is just due to heat stress, most are inside dogs, with airconditioning. but these dogs I suppose are used to Arctic climates, I wonder if we did this just thinking of ourselves and not the dogs. I am not in any way ridiculing owners of said breeds, just asking the question, as I'm not even sure where I stand.
 

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Absolutely ridiculous.

I did Sibe rescue for three years here in Texas. Despite having a outdoor kennels on the board member's property where most the dogs were housed, we NEVER had a dog get heat stroke or anything like that. Texas regularly is in the 105ish range in August, with VERY high humidity and not much breeze during the hardest part of the day. If you've got shade and water available and dogs are acclimated properly (this means NOT just turning tem out mid-afternoon in august but having them out enough to get used to the heat), northern breeds aren't any more prone to heat stroke than any other breed- and they're at significantly LESS risk than brachecephalic breeds!
 

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You can keep a sled dog in those temps, but you have to be careful about what you let them do.
 

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Provide shed and cold water,and strokes won't happen.

Sled dogs have an insulation coat for both cold and heat, the owners probably didn't have appropiate shelter for the dogs.
 

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Your username is GSDGAL, so I'm assuming you have a GSD? They are a double coated breed just like a Husky. ;-)

I have a GSD/Akita mix and I do know that she gets seriously unhappy if the indoor temp gets above 70*F. We have central air and keep it quite cool, and have a fan blowing on her in her crate at night. During the day, she prefers to be outside so she has adequate shade/shelter and a kiddie pool filled with cool water.

As long as appropriate measures are taken, I see no reason why people in hot climates shouldn't own Northern breeds. ANY dog can get heat stroke if not given the proper amount of shade and water.
 

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I have a siberian husky, and I live in Texas. He does fine.
I also had a samoyed mix, and another husky.

There are many huskies here.
 

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If you run any dog in those temps, they'll get heat stroke....maybe the Northern breeds are more likely to run themselves into trouble.

Although, in my experience, Willow (Lab) was perfectly willing to run herself into heat stroke, and we had to watch her carefully when it was hot out. Penny (Husky mix) is a lot better about that and will just lie around if it's too hot for her. So I think it depends on the individual dog too.
 

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The only reason why Akira gets really hot it's because he's black. I used to live in eastern Canada which is a land of extreme temperatures and he did just fine. I am careful about him not getting too hot (but he never gets to cold lol) and he's been ok.
 

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I don't think it matters- dogs belong indoors and that's why we have air conditioning.
 

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I live in Florida and I often see people out cycling and/or jogging with their huskys--I always say "those idiots-what are they thinking??????"
 

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Air conditionning is pretty rare in Europe, I don't know about Australia but dogs lived thousand of years without AC (humans too for that matter)
AC (in houses) is pretty rare here too and we and our dogs get along just fine...mind you it doesn't get too hot here in summer compared to the States and Austrailia.

That being said, we will get up to around 30 or 32 C sometimes in the summer and most huskies or other northern breeds still seem fine outside. Just no running around! Shade, plenty of water and they should be okay.
 

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Willow did just fine in the late summer heat last year. She spends the majority of each day outdoors, so in the spring and fall she has plenty of time to adjust to the changing temps. I think that is key.

We live in a densely wooded area in a valley, so our daytime highs are much lower than the surrounding area. Also, her "kennel" has a full roof and ceiling fan, which keeps her out of the direct sun and heat. In the afternoons in the summer, I'll often grab a garden hose and spray down the kennel with a fine mist, making a point to get Willow too. ;) It really gets the temperature in the area to drop, and the cool water on her fur helps keep her more comfortable as well.

When we put up the new fenced area in a few weeks, I'll be digging out a shallow pit and building a little cabin around it to make a little earth shelter for the dogs. The ground dug out of the inside, then sloped around the outside of the shelter, will really help to keep the doghouse cool in the summer and warm in winter.

I don't think it matters- dogs belong indoors and that's why we have air conditioning.
Well, I don't have AC here so my home is usually just as warm as the surrounding property! I understand your comment in regards to people living in the city, but in a rural situation like mine, if my dogs were indoors the majority of the day, they would never see me!! I work from home maintaining a small hobby farm. That means I'm usually outdoors from 7:00 am to 4:00 pm, with short breaks throughout. This way, even though the dogs can't be off-leash by my side, they can at least watch me and sometimes join in my chores on a long line.

Also, because I sled and scooter with my dogs, they have to stay acclimated to the current season's temps. I don't ever run them in the heat of the day, but it's important that they aren't exhausted by 65 - 75 degree temps in the mornings.
 

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We live in FL with a husky and I've seen more huskies in Florida than I ever did when we lived in Washington (where our husky is from). Part of what I love so much about the breed is how highly adaptable they are to extremes, be they cold or hot, provided they have suitable time to acclimatize. When we lived in WA and visited FL in the dead of winter we took our husky from 30's (Fahrenheit) to mid 70 degree temps and he had a tough time dealing with it due to the shock of such a temp change. However when we moved from WA to FL during the warmer months (Sept) he did not have such issues since he was already used to the warmer summer temps. So as long as the dogs have time to acclimatize AND are provided with shade and plenty of water there's no reason they should be kept out of warmer climates or having heat strokes.
 
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