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Discussion Starter #1
Eddee is 11.6 pounds. Is he considered a toy or just a small mixed breed? I am sure he is about as big as he is going to get.

Thanks ... need it to consider food with. :)
 

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Eddee is 11.6 pounds. Is he considered a toy or just a small mixed breed? I am sure he is about as big as he is going to get.

Thanks ... need it to consider food with. :)
Toy is > 10, I believe. So, small.
 

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The term "toy" is used for dogs anywhere from 4 to 12 lbs.For anything smaller the term "teacup" is used :) From 12lbs up,they are considered small.

Edited to add-Some breeds are considered "toy" breeds even if they exceed 12lbs ;) Some yorkies,chihuahuas,toy poodles etc can exceed that weight yet they´re still toys ;) If you are talking about a mix,then I´d just go by the standards.

If you dog is a mix,and weighs 10lbs,then yes,you can certainly consider him a "toy".
 

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The term "toy" is used for dogs anywhere from 4 to 12 lbs.For anything smaller the term "teacup" is used From 12lbs up,they are considered small.
No no no! :) "Teacup" is not a legitimate term in the dog world, not at all. It does not appear in any breed standard, and the yorkie, chihuahua, pomeranian, maltese, etc. breed clubs specifically caution against buying dogs labeled as "teacup." It's just a term that unscrupulous breeders use in order to make their tiny dogs (often runts) sound special. Examples from a couple of the American breed clubs:

If you are interested in purchasing a tiny Yorkie, sometimes called a Teacup, Micro Mini, Teeny, or any other name that means “extra small”, there are several things you should consider. The YTCA’s Code of Ethics precludes the use of the words “teacup”, “tiny specialists”, doll faced, or similar terminology by its members, and for good reason. All breeders may occasionally have an unusually small Yorkie (hopefully healthy), though no responsible breeder breeds for this trait.
Unfortunately, the additional adjectives used to describe the size differences and physical appearances are many and have been misused for so long they now seem legitimate. Teacup, Pocket Size, Tiny Toy, Miniature or Standard - are just a few of the many tags and labels that have been attached to this breed over the years. The Chihuahua Club of America is concerned that these terms may be used to entice prospective buyers into thinking that puppies described in this way are of greater monetary value. They are not and the use of these terms is incorrect and misleading.

Occasionally, within a litter, there may be a puppy that is unusually small. That puppy is a small Chihuahua and any other breakdown in description is not correct. To attach any of these additional labels to a particular puppy is to misrepresent that Chihuahua as something that is rare or exceptional and causes a great deal of confusion among those new fanciers who are looking for a Chihuahua.
The Pomeranian standard calls for a dog which is between 3 and 7 pounds; has small erect ears; a thick double coat (long guard hairs held off the body by a soft fluffy undercoat) which is an all-weather protectant against heat, cold, rain or snow; a tail covered with long hair which lies flat over the back; and a pronounced stop which gives it the appearance of a high forehead. Most correctly sized Poms - there is no such thing as a Teacup or Toy Pomeranian; they are a toy breed - are between 4 and 7 pounds.
There is no such thing as a "teacup" or "pocket" Maltese. The Maltese is a TOY breed. Our Standard calls for the Maltese to be "under 7 lbs. with 4-6 lbs. preferred". Some Maltese do mature at under 4 lbs. while others mature at over 7 lbs.
From here, here, here, and here. :)

Interestingly, there is no minimum size in the chihuahua or yorkie standards, just a maximum:

Chi:

Size, Proportion, Substance
Weight – A well balanced little dog not to exceed 6 pounds.
Yorkshire Terrier:

Weight
Must not exceed seven pounds.
Therefore, there could be no such thing as a "teacup" yorkie or chihuahua even if the term were legitimate. The tiniest example of the breed is still just a plain old yorkie or chihuahua.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Are you aiming to give your dog a complex? :p
Hehehe!!! .... he already has that. :D ... Runs around looking "up" and barks at anything taller than himself. Lol!
 

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No no no! :) "Teacup" is not a legitimate term in the dog world, not at all. It does not appear in any breed standard, and the yorkie, chihuahua, pomeranian, maltese, etc. breed clubs specifically caution against buying dogs labeled as "teacup." It's just a term that unscrupulous breeders use in order to make their tiny dogs (often runts) sound special. Examples from a couple of the American breed clubs:









From here, here, here, and here. :)

Interestingly, there is no minimum size in the chihuahua or yorkie standards, just a maximum:

Chi:



Yorkshire Terrier:



Therefore, there could be no such thing as a "teacup" yorkie or chihuahua even if the term were legitimate. The tiniest example of the breed is still just a plain old yorkie or chihuahua.
Couldn't have said it better myself.

Eddee would be a small dog, I don't think he is "toy" size.
 

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No no no! :) "Teacup" is not a legitimate term in the dog world, not at all.
I know ;) But it´s still mainly used to explain size.There´s no such thing on paper,neither are toy breed seperated into sub-categories..a toy breed is a toy breed,but using certain terms,you can quickly let people know what size (more or less) you are talking about once you know that basic standards.
Like,if I told you (lets say you are a yorkie lover lol) that I had a "tea cup" yorkie,you´d know that what I mean is that my yorkie is on the small end of the standard ;) Not that I have a special kind of dog at all lol.

I had 3 yorkies at one time.As adults (2+ years old) they were 2lbs,4lbs and 6lbs in weight.All toys regardless of size,but people still reffered to the smallest one as a teacup ;) I also have friends who own yorkies that weigh up to 14lbs,and although they exceed the standard,they´re still "toys" :)
 

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I know ;) But it´s still mainly used to explain size.There´s no such thing on paper,neither are toy breed seperated into sub-categories..a toy breed is a toy breed,but using certain terms,you can quickly let people know what size (more or less) you are talking about once you know that basic standards.
Like,if I told you (lets say you are a yorkie lover lol) that I had a "tea cup" yorkie,you´d know that what I mean is that my yorkie is on the small end of the standard ;)
Actually, I'd probably think something like, "Oh no, that poor woman bought her yorkie from an awful breeder. I hope it doesn't develop any bad health problems!"

Also, like I pointed out, there is no small end of the standard, only a large end. :)
 

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Actually, I'd probably think something like, "Oh no, that poor woman bought her yorkie from an awful breeder. I hope it doesn't develop any bad health problems!"

Also, like I pointed out, there is no small end of the standard, only a large end. :)
I sometimes forget I´m not on a yorkie forum lol.You´d understand me alot better if I were ;)
ALOT Of people get VERY small yorkies form great breeders and had no idea their dog would end up being so small.I got Lady (my 2lb yorkie) from a great breeder (still in contact 10 years later)..she had sibblings that grew up to be 6pounders,Lady was just the runt I guess.
Now,when people purposely go out to buy themselfs a "teacup" (without understanding that it´s just a fancy name-not a category) and spend thousands thinking they are buying something amazing and rare,then you have a problem ;)

Editing to add-In my original post I said "For anything smaller the term "teacup" is used"..what I should have said was "usually" used ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
Lol! Eddee next to a mouse pad . Lol!

 

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I sometimes forget I´m not on a yorkie forum lol.You´d understand me alot better if I were ;)
ALOT Of people get VERY small yorkies form great breeders and had no idea their dog would end up being so small.I got Lady (my 2lb yorkie) from a great breeder (still in contact 10 years later)..she had sibblings that grew up to be 6pounders,Lady was just the runt I guess.
Now,when people purposely go out to buy themselfs a "teacup" (without understanding that it´s just a fancy name-not a category) and spend thousands thinking they are buying something amazing and rare,then you have a problem ;)
I understand exactly what you're saying. I just think it's a very bad idea, especially for knowledgeable yorkshire terrier owners, to refer to their dogs as "teacups." You know it's not a legitimate term, but most people don't. When people like you use it, it makes the general public think that the term is legitimate, and then when they go looking for a yorkie of their own, they could very well end up buying a "teacup" at a pet store or from a terrible breeder. A good breeder -- a member in good standing of the Yorkshire Terrier Club of America (or wherever else), who subscribes to the code of ethics -- is not allowed to use the term.
 

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I understand exactly what you're saying. I just think it's a very bad idea, especially for knowledgeable yorkshire terrier owners, to refer to their dogs as "teacups." You know it's not a legitimate term, but most people don't. When people like you use it, it makes the general public think that the term is legitimate, and then when they go looking for a yorkie of their own, they could very well end up buying a "teacup" at a pet store or from a terrible breeder. A good breeder -- a member in good standing of the Yorkshire Terrier Club of America (or wherever else), who subscribes to the code of ethics -- is not allowed to use the term.
You´re right.
I just want to clarify that I have never reffered to any of my own dogs as teacups...other people have,and after years of doing alot of explaining (on walks,sitting in the waiting room at the vets etc),you usually just end up nodding and saying "yeah fine,whatever" you know? I use the term lightly when I want to explain a certain weight now.

Like,I will always say <4lbs "tea cup" (always using quotation marks because its just a term) just so people know that I´m talking about an under 4lb dog ;)
 

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Why not just say "I have a four-pound yorkie" or even "I have a yorkie"? No extra descriptive term, especially not such a loaded one, is needed at all. If people care about the size, they can ask. :)

And I know what you mean. When people ask if Casper is a "mini husky," I mostly just say "yeah" now because I don't feel like explaining what a klee kai is for the six hundredth time. But if someone actually asks what he is, I will always say "Alaskan Klee Kai" and explain further from there if they ask. :)
 

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Why not just say "I have a four-pound yorkie" or even "I have a yorkie"? No extra descriptive term, especially not such a loaded one, is needed at all. If people care about the size, they can ask. :)
I dont usually mention the size of my own at all..age,yes,but not the size (unless someone asks and I´ll just tell them what they weigh).
If I´m explaining the size of another dog/any dog,then I will be sloppy and use the term if I think they´ll have heard it and understand what weight I´m talking about.

My last vet actually had Lady down on her records & computer as "teacup" next to her name,so that when I phoned in for anything,she knew what size she was without going right down to the weight/size section of her history.This was handy when I was asking about doses of certain meds,how much food I should give her etc etc.I guess she found it quicker that way... ?

Anyhoo,just on a lighter note,I did actually encounter a german woman who owned a "tea-cup" spanish water dog :p Yes,she bought him (very over priced by the way) because he was smaller than his littermates.Now,this is where I did actually take the time to explain (with not much luck) that this is just a term,a nickname if you will...
Not everyone wants to hear that they´ve just spent over a thousand euros on a dog that doesnt exsist lol
 

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Discussion Starter #20
So .... this is a good education going on. I knew these were just selling points as titles .... but I see dog foods for "small breeds" and am wondering if it is all it is cracked up to be .... or is it just another ploy?
 
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