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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I woke up this morning around 6am like normal do to let the dog out. He had solid poops and peed.

I brought him back in and he started to vomit and threw-up in his cage. I quickly ran him to the bathroom where he threw-up a little in his mouth and swallowed it. (lol dogs are so groose :) ). I went back in his cage to clean up and I noticed a piece of (edit) (onion) in his vomit which was just a white foam. I figured he was fine so I gave him water and went back to sleep.

My girl friend woke up at 800 to go to work and she let him out and he pooped fine again outside. so she fed him his breakfast so we stay on schedule.

I woke up around 11am to let him out again and he ran to the door and sat down. I put on the leash and he RAN to his pooping spot and had diarrhea, after he was finished I brought him back in and he played a little and ran back to the door. I let him back out and he finished up.

I have him sitting in his cage right now wondering if I should just let him chill or if I should take him to the vet. I think he just ate something he shouldn't have and how he is just getting it out of his body and its nothing crazy but other opinions are welcome.
 

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This is copied and pasted from http://www.missouriscenicrivers.com/baddogfoods.html


"Onions cause hemolytic anemia, which means that the red blood cells break down leaving the dog short of oxygen. Onion poisoning can occur with a single ingestion of large quantities or with repeated meals containing small amounts of onion. The condition generally improves once the dog is prevented from eating any further onion. The poisoning may occur a few days after the dog has eaten the onion. At first dogs affected by onion poisoning show gastroenteritis with vomiting and diarrhea, weakness and show little or no interest in food. The red pigment from the burst blood cells appears in an affected dog's urine making it dark colored. The dog will experience shortness of breath because the red blood cells that carry oxygen through the body are reduced in number. Other symptoms are elevated body temperature, confusion, and increased heart rate. Seek veterinary care immediately.

The quantity of onions, raw or cooked, required is high enough that dogs can generally tolerate small doses of onions without any problem and moderate amounts of onion without apparent signs of onion poisoning. All forms of onion can be a problem including dehydrated onions, raw onions, cooked onions and table scraps containing cooked onions and/or garlic. Left over pizza, Chinese dishes and commercial baby food containing onion, sometimes fed as a supplement to young pets, can cause illness.

While garlic also contains the toxic ingredient thiosulphate, it seems that garlic is less toxic and large amounts would need to be eaten to cause illness."
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
This is copied and pasted from http://www.missouriscenicrivers.com/baddogfoods.html


"Onions cause hemolytic anemia, which means that the red blood cells break down leaving the dog short of oxygen. Onion poisoning can occur with a single ingestion of large quantities or with repeated meals containing small amounts of onion. The condition generally improves once the dog is prevented from eating any further onion. The poisoning may occur a few days after the dog has eaten the onion. At first dogs affected by onion poisoning show gastroenteritis with vomiting and diarrhea, weakness and show little or no interest in food. The red pigment from the burst blood cells appears in an affected dog's urine making it dark colored. The dog will experience shortness of breath because the red blood cells that carry oxygen through the body are reduced in number. Other symptoms are elevated body temperature, confusion, and increased heart rate. Seek veterinary care immediately.

The quantity of onions, raw or cooked, required is high enough that dogs can generally tolerate small doses of onions without any problem and moderate amounts of onion without apparent signs of onion poisoning. All forms of onion can be a problem including dehydrated onions, raw onions, cooked onions and table scraps containing cooked onions and/or garlic. Left over pizza, Chinese dishes and commercial baby food containing onion, sometimes fed as a supplement to young pets, can cause illness.

While garlic also contains the toxic ingredient thiosulphate, it seems that garlic is less toxic and large amounts would need to be eaten to cause illness."
Nice information! thank you very much, Jack seems to be doing better. All his poop is solid now and he hasn't vomited since this morning. Thank you for those who helped.
 
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