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:nono: I am not sure what it is. I think it is dominance or poor socialization. I have a Siberian Husky female that I rescued. She is a very people and child friendly dog. BUT she seems to not like other dogs.. She is FINALLY okay with My English Bulldog. But they still have little scuffles. I know it starts her fur goes up on her back and her tail is brought up high on her back. And then it starts. Usually over food or a toy. But now it is with him running ahead of her or him trying to play with her. Sometimes she seems like she wants to play by grabbing my other dog and then letting go and running ;; But when he catches up she then does her little dominance pose. It is so frustrating because I take my dog to the park and I would like to take her with.

I do know she HATE being alone also. She will wine and wine if Brock (bulldog) does not stay in the house with her. One time it was so bad she actually broke out of her wire kennel.


Other than this she is almost perfect. She is calm in the house and only high energy outside. She plays well with my baby and doesn't get fussy when she tugs or takes toys from her.. She stays off of furniture etc.

Any advice on how I can fix her issues would be nice.


 

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You say they are good together in house and this is good. You need to work on firm and consistent obedience training as this will go a long way in solving your problem especially with the Husky. Exercise helps as always. Toys should belong to you and put up when not in use. Feed separately for sure.

Beautiful Dog......................

Best , oldhounddog
 

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Thanks.
I can give her little exercise. I should have put that in there. I have to keep her calm during heartworm treatment. And the Bulldog, Lol, He likes it at first then we end up dragging him back sometimes.

But I am going to try the toy thing. And they are fed seperatly now. While one is out potty in the morning the other is eating :3 And I guess rawhides or any toys seperate or they just dont get anything. Hopefully this will end up working. Thanks for the toy advice.
 

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Even if you can't exercise as much as she'd need during heartworm treatment, you can certainly give her mental stimulation. Teach her tricks or something so she has to think. Google "clicker training" and you should find plenty you can do with her to make her mentally tired. Also, work on "leave it" and recall so you can call her off when she gets too pushy.
 

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Good idea. I am definitly going to try it. I see it on that show it's me or the dog, but will look more into it. She is a very smart girl. Will be good for her. I also try to give her some toys she has to work to get treats out of. The kongs and the big plastic wobble kong one. Seems to like them. This sounds like it will help me a bit.

Also I do take her for daily walks. We just dont let her run too much or get too excited. She is doing very well with this though and her treatment :3
 

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A husky is a dog that needs a job ... Working dogs are notorious for getting bossy and getting into things they have no business getting into unless they are kept busy. They need a job and that can be anything you think is fun. :)
 

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From what I know of Huskies, the calm inside and high energy outside is completely normal for this breed. My advice would be to keep high-value items off the floor. Don't just leave bones and toys the dogs really love lying around, or fights are nearly certain to follow. It's a lot like leaving prize toys out for two 3-5 year old kids and hoping they'll share and play well together. It's a nice thought, but in real like this isn't very likely. I would feed them separately and give toys to them while you're able to supervise, and them pick the toys up when play is done. Get each dog a few toys they really love and rotate leaving one in each crate (if you use crates) when they are put up for the day or asleep. I use crates for nighttime and if I'm going to be gone more than an hour, and found that putting a partial board between the crates to block visibility is an easy way to prevent snarling and barking when toys are in the crates. Even though they can't get to them, if there's line of sight, barking and snarling are certain.

Other than that, work this dog like she's 5 normal dogs. Huskies are one of the highest-energy dogs when it comes to required exercise. They were bred to pull weight across long distances, but a lot of people forget this fact when bringing one home. If you don't exercise your dog enough (and with a Husky this will require some thought and planning so as not to take over your life), she will become a terror over time. Think of a time when you were really excited about some upcoming event, and found yourself stuck in a long, mind-numbingly boring meeting at work. Remember how difficult it was to stay focused on anything that was said or even to remain sitting still. Take that and regress your self-control to that of when you were 5 years old, and crank up the volume on your energy about 10 times. Now you have what your dog will experience if not taken care of properly.
 

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From what I know of Huskies, the calm inside and high energy outside is completely normal for this breed. My advice would be to keep high-value items off the floor. Don't just leave bones and toys the dogs really love lying around, or fights are nearly certain to follow. It's a lot like leaving prize toys out for two 3-5 year old kids and hoping they'll share and play well together. It's a nice thought, but in real like this isn't very likely. I would feed them separately and give toys to them while you're able to supervise, and them pick the toys up when play is done. Get each dog a few toys they really love and rotate leaving one in each crate (if you use crates) when they are put up for the day or asleep. I use crates for nighttime and if I'm going to be gone more than an hour, and found that putting a partial board between the crates to block visibility is an easy way to prevent snarling and barking when toys are in the crates. Even though they can't get to them, if there's line of sight, barking and snarling are certain.

Other than that, work this dog like she's 5 normal dogs. Huskies are one of the highest-energy dogs when it comes to required exercise. They were bred to pull weight across long distances, but a lot of people forget this fact when bringing one home. If you don't exercise your dog enough (and with a Husky this will require some thought and planning so as not to take over your life), she will become a terror over time. Think of a time when you were really excited about some upcoming event, and found yourself stuck in a long, mind-numbingly boring meeting at work. Remember how difficult it was to stay focused on anything that was said or even to remain sitting still. Take that and regress your self-control to that of when you were 5 years old, and crank up the volume on your energy about 10 times. Now you have what your dog will experience if not taken care of properly.
Oh now I understand this. And I have been keeping things up now. Seems to be helping. Thanks for the advice. I will do the crate thing also. ANd I suppose you're right it is usually over things that sqeak and raw hides ( the best toys ). She does give warning though before a fight. Her fur stand up and she does kind of a howling yelping thing into the other dogs face. So I can try to stop it before it starts. It hasnt happened though since all of the advice. So I think I am doing something right.


And for the exercise, I really cant work her too hard. She is on a long term heart treatment and the vets want me to keep her calmer. I do take her on daily walks though. Nothing too ridiculous. Or play with her. Rops toys and squeakers. I also give her the kong puzzle toys to get treats out of. And she hasnt become a terror yet. Lol. Knock on wood. She is very mellow in the house and doesnt chew on anything when bored like some Huskies.
 

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Oh now I understand this. And I have been keeping things up now. Seems to be helping. Thanks for the advice. I will do the crate thing also. ANd I suppose you're right it is usually over things that sqeak and raw hides ( the best toys ). She does give warning though before a fight. Her fur stand up and she does kind of a howling yelping thing into the other dogs face. So I can try to stop it before it starts. It hasnt happened though since all of the advice. So I think I am doing something right.


And for the exercise, I really cant work her too hard. She is on a long term heart treatment and the vets want me to keep her calmer. I do take her on daily walks though. Nothing too ridiculous. Or play with her. Rops toys and squeakers. I also give her the kong puzzle toys to get treats out of. And she hasnt become a terror yet. Lol. Knock on wood. She is very mellow in the house and doesnt chew on anything when bored like some Huskies.
Certainly limit her work to what she's able to handle given her health conditions. I'm glad things are getting better! My dogs nearly always get along, but when I put toys down, I monitor them closely, especially if those toys are chew toys or bones. I swear, each dog suddenly turns into a clepto and will leave their bone to steal someone else's. Drives me nuts. Generally speaking, I only give bones or really high-value treats if I can keep them separated somehow. I'll throw bones/toys into their crates, or just give them each one if they decide to hang out in different rooms, which often happens if my wife and I are in different rooms. I never leave bones on the floor, or my normally peaceable dogs turn into psychos. I swear, the company selling those things is probably putting something highly addictive in them. At least they don't resource guard with me or my wife! They'll growl at each other, but drop them on command if I've had enough. Thank goodness. Anyway, if your dog can't take a lot of exercise, I'd still grab a Kong or three. Get the black one that's heavy-duty, some dog treats your dog likes, and some peanut butter. Put a bit of peanut butter on each dog treat and stuff it in the Kong, and when it's pretty full - freeze it. Give that to your dog and she'll lick at it for hours. This helps with mental stimulation and cuts down on problem behaviors.
 

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And for the exercise, I really cant work her too hard. She is on a long term heart treatment and the vets want me to keep her calmer.
What heart problem does she have and what kind of treatment is she on?

My Siberian has had subaortic stenosis diagnosed as a heart murmur at 12 weeks and then diagnosed as stenosis at 6 months. She gets multiple walks a day and even pulls me on a bike every few days for about an hour. The exercise helps to strengthen their heart. She's also on Atenolol (Beta Blocker) and fish oil pills to help with her heart as well.

Something you might not also realize is that what "calm" to say, a golden retriever is, is not "calm" to a Siberian. A Golden's highest energy point could be the "calm" of a Siberian Husky. They're bred to work. They're bred to pull. They're bred to be extremely high energy for those reasons. Bred to pull loads on a sled very long distances in freezing weather. She's probably a lot more capable of doing activities than you realize. I know if I'm not having Bella pull me on the bike she is hardly tired from her walks anymore. But since we've been doing 2-4 mile walks and 2 or 3 mile pulls on the bike, along with numerous training sessions throughout the day - She's very mellow in the house.

Just some things to think about :)
 

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Oh wow. Made a typo. Heart worms. She is on the ivermectin and doxycycline treatment. She had heart worms when we got her. We found an ad for her for free on craigslist and I didnt want someone who wouldnt treat her to get her :c it's not expensive at all.

But I suppose you are right that she should get more. I am affraid to let her pull me on a bike, I see people do it on youtube and TV and wonder how they dont tip over. Lol. I would need training wheels the first few times xD Lol. But it seems like a good idea. I might ask the vet if she is good to do those things. I was just told to keep her calmer.


And Wil.Wish

We do have the kitchen gated. I could always keep one in there and the other in the living room. Lol. We have a toddler that loves getting into the trash can more than the dogs would. So we keep it gated most days.

Also we got her one of those really huge plastic kongs that wobble and the treats spill out of it if she gets it right. And the rubber one too. She tore all the green off of the tennis ball bone though c: Had to kill the squeaker !!
 

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Well now everything makes sense :). Like I said, Siberian's are bred to work, to pull and to continue doing it over great distances for a long time. So what's calm to one breed of dog isn't for a Siberian. She can handle a lot more than you (or the vet) give her credit for.

Quite a few people bike/scooter with their dogs on here and have made several threads about it. Sassafras has a great thread http://www.dogforums.com/dog-pictures-forum/97098-scootering.html and I believe +two just started a thread about their adventures! There's set ups that you can get to maximize the safety of both you and your dog while doing it. It's great, especially for Siberian's who it is hardwired into their being to pull.
 
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