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Discussion Starter #1
At the dog park, a little female bichon was repeatedly humping Kabota. He didn't really seem to care. He was playing with other dogs, she would hump him any time he was standing still, and he would just walk off when something interesting caught his eye.

The bichon's owner was getting very upset and kept apologizing to me and stopping her humping when he could get to her in time. I told him that as long as Kabota wasn't upset about it, I wasn't upset about it. (As to why he had her in the park, she apparently only does this to some dogs, not all dogs. Kabota was the first to inspire her to humping in a few months. Quite the lady's man, my dog!)

My feeling is that it's a training issue with his dog, I'm not stepping into that. It's just not my place if no one's getting injured. I don't want to confuse someone else's training by doing it differently. (Used to drive me nuts when people did that with Muggsy. When I want training help, I'll ask.) If Kabota had seemed the slightest bit upset, I would have stepped in, but really, he didn't seem to notice.

Opinions?
 

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Humping/mounting behavior is generally a way that dogs display dominance. I'm not sure it's necessarily a training issue...though I guess it could be. If your dog isn't upset by it, I'd just let it go. I will say that if it was my dog doing the mounting, I'd stop the behavior because if she did it to the wrong dog, it could start a fight.
 

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If it's really getting on your nerves, I'd stop the dog or ask the owner to stop it. But you said she does stop her dog. Is her Bichon spayed/neutered? I hope so! But yes, this is a dominance trait; your dog seems really good about it. I usually stop my dog from "hugging" another dog and apologize or joke around saying, "I swear to you he's neutered!"

I would either take your dog to the dog park when that lady isn't there (I know it's hard to tell when you don't know the person) or just wait till she leaves the dog park so you can go in with Kabota. That would really annoy me if another dog did that to Luke or if Luke did that to another dog, but that's me.
Btw, what does Kabota's name mean? It's different, but cool.
 

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To me it really depends on the situation. In yours I'd have done the same and not cared. When we still went to the dog park Jubel would mount, usually not actually hump just mount, to try and initiate play with other dogs. Sometimes it works and sometimes they are annoyed and tell him off. The majority of the time I stepped in and stopped him. He never seemed to mind if another dog humped/mounted him, he'd just turn around and start wrestling with them.

A few times and third dog, usually small, would come and hump Jubel while he was already playing with another dog. Jubel would just ignore the third dog and keep playing. I've never stepped in to stop a dog from mounting/humpping Jubel as he's never seemed to care and it's something he does to other dogs himself so I'm less inclined to "protect" him from his own behaviors.

Very rarely but it did happen Jubel would hump on a small dog, usually a beagle or beagle mix no clue why them specifically, and I'd stop him right away. If he persisted we'd leave the park. It was very rare for him to ever bother any dog significantly smaller than him but there were no second chances when he did.

He goes to daycare now so I don't really know if he humps or mounts there as I can't see the webcam from work but they've never mentioned any 'bad' behavior from him and I've asked a few times. Haha I even asked about his play growling and vocalizing in play and they laughed and said he wasn't even close to as 'bad' as some of the other dogs there in play growls. One of the many reasons I stopped going to the dog park were some owners convinced Jubel was being aggressive with his play growling nevermind the relaxed, playful body language he displayed.
 

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Not a training issue IMO. It's a dominance gesture and I have a feeling the owners are embarrassed because they either think it is a sexual display or that others perceive it that way. There is no need to stop it from a safety or behavioral statndpoint; the dog who is being humped will react if s/he has an issue with it ;). My little rescue humps a lot of dogs, usually big ones. They either ignore her or once in a while make a big and loud stink about it and Blue gets the message and stops doing it (with them).
 

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Marley humps sometimes. He is getting A LOT better but we're still working on it. He now responds to leave it (most of the time). I think he does it mostly out of play. He's 9 months old and he'll be playing with a dog and once they start ignoring him and won't respond to his play bows and hopping around he'll try and hump them.

He's had a dog tell him off for it before and he stopped. If he won't leave a dog alone we just leave the park and come back later. And also there are a few dogs I know that he is just obsessed with. When we see them come in we leave before he can start. Most owners tell me they don't care as long as their dog doesn't care. Which makes me feel better but we're still working on stopping it completely, it isn't something I want him to do to every dog he meets at the park.

We go to a fairly good size park and its hard to always stop him right away. Its impossible to always be right there next to him so if he's on the other side of the park and he tries to hump someones dog, I usually appreciate it if they block him until I can redirect him or tell him no, leave it. I just prefer they don't say anything and as long as they aren't rough with him lol. But since this dog is only humping your dog, maybe she just really likes him =) If you really don't care about it you could strike up a conversation with owner and maybe it would help put them at ease about it.
 

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I am curious why you feel the need to stop it. It is part of their dog interaction, establishing a sort of hierarchy in the loose pack they are at the park. I don't understand why anybody would have an issue with it. Is it because it looks like mating? I am not trying to be snarky here, I really would like find out why this is an issue.

The park I frequent has about half the people pulling their dogs off and the other just ignore it. I find it interesting to watch the dogs; some don't mind it, and the size of the humper (or the humped) varies tremendously, sometimes it turns into play and sometimes it turns into telling the humper off. Those who have been told off usually stay away from that dog. IMO the dogs seem to be dealing with it just fine and there is nothing to be embarrassed about. I have to admit though that my dog is little and she cannot immobilize another dog. I might feel differently if she were a large dog. But even then, unless the humped is physically unable to shake off the humper, I'd say let the dogs deal with it.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I don't feel a need to stop it. Kabota has proven he will tell off another dog that's bothering him, so I figure he must not care. The other owner was so embarrassed and stressed about it, I was just wondering if I should have done something about it. Really, I don't feel a need to avoid that dog since it wasn't an issue for the dogs, but I do feel bad that the owner was apologizing to me and making a fuss. (I've quickly learned that it's not the dogs at the park that are the problem, it's the owners.) He was making such a fuss I started to wonder if it really was a problem. I'm guessing other people probably have reacted badly to his dog humping and he was afraid that I was angry about it. Which I wasn't at all.

I got Kabota from a rescue. He's from Kentucky. I think the original owners named him after the tractor company.
 

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My dogs also little, and honestly I have a good laugh when he's trying to hump the Great Dane mix. I really think he does it out of play but sometimes he can't take a hint. I don't want him to get hurt by a dog 3 times his size.

A lot of owners at the park we go to find it rude and don't appreciate it, even if their dog doesn't mind. Since it is getting better and it seems to be something we can train him not to do, I'd rather just train it. He also isn't neutered and I'm still on the border of whether I want to even get him fixed or not. If I decide to I want to wait until he's at least 2. I feel a lot better about my decision to wait to neuter him if I know we can go to the dog park and he isn't going to try humping every dog. Also when he's trying to mount someone's dog and they ask if he's neutered yet and I say no, they don't seem very happy about it.

I understand what you're saying and it doesn't bother me if another dog tries to hump mine. I just don't want to feel pushed out of the only park we both enjoy.
 

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Agree, a lot of owners find it rude, especially if it's a bigger dog humping a little dog. Actually, that's the only time I find it bothersome. Usually Biscuit is feisty and will tell off another dog that's bothering her, but that's difficult if the humper is twice her size!

I will say...Biscuit is a spayed female dog, and there was one day a couple of weeks ago at the dog park that she and her two doggy friends (both also spayed females) were basically taking turns humping each others' faces. I know it's not sexual, but I still can't help but laugh at things like that. Like, "Hey, ladies? You're doing it wrong!"
 

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Humping can mean all sorts of things. domience, sexual, play, excitment ect

solo will hump dogs that ignore him. if he was playign with a dog first, and that dog goes off and plays with another, he will hump it then play bow to try and bring the dog back to him. I still discourage it, as it can cause a issue with the wrong dog.

Blaze doesnt hump, but he will do the one paw thing, I stop that as well. As again it can cause issues. I stop all dogs from humping Blaze, as he will only tolerate it for about 30 sedoncs, then his teeth will come out, plus he is older, and his back legs/hips are not what they used to be. So i try to keep dogs off him for fear of harming him.
 

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Honest with you, if the humpee isn't objecting to it, I don't think it's a problem at all. I try to discourage my dogs from doing it, just in the interest of human social acceptability. I'm pretty sure that if my dog appeared intimidated, I'd want it stopped. Guess that applies to pretty much any behavior.

But, I've noticed that both my dogs are quite adept at communicating their displeasure without starting a fight.

Also when he's trying to mount someone's dog and they ask if he's neutered yet and I say no, they don't seem very happy about it.
I don't think that should matter at all. Let 'em be unhappy. Neutering won't stop humping, and he's not going to impregnate a dog at the dog park -- after all, the rules prohibit bitches in season, right? My pup is keeping his balls until he's finished growing, too.
 

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Um, why is it more of an issue if the dog is unneutered? Neutered males hump and females will hump, too. It's not a neutered/unneutered issue. (Kabota is 3 or 4 and was neutered a month ago and he doesn't hump at all.) I guess my confusion is that I don't view humping as a sexual, and therefore embarrassing, issue, so it was confusing to me when I had to talk to someone who does.
 

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I know Tankstar said it, but I'll say it again. Humping isn't ALWAYS out of dominance. SOMETIMES it's other things, like excitement, play, or just plain bad dog manners.

Whatever the reasons, a great many dogs consider it rude behavior for another dog to hump them. The only issue I'd have with it is that, someday, your dog may grow tired of it and try to warn the other dog. If the other dog doesn't heed the warning it could cause a problem.
 

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Have you ever seen humping out of so called dominance? It looks completely different to regular old humping.

I would be willing to say that 95% of humping has nothing to do with "dominance".
 

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Agreed. An aggressive dog humping another will growl if disturbed, and may put his (her) head on the other dog's neck before humping. As Tankstar said, there is also play humping that leads to a playbow (or sexual behavior). And, there's purely sexual humping usually encouraged by an unneutered female... to an intact or neutered (!!) male.

My dog is the latter ... he's 11 yo, neutered, and humps for play but will escalate to sexually excited humping (yes, I learned the birds and the bees again, when he learned to hump at age 8 yo !!!). I encourage other people to pull him off of their dogs when he humps, simply b/c he's being a pest, if the other dog won't play.

For a similar reason, I encourage you to gently remove the Bichon female, even if your dog ignores her. It may not hurt, but I don't see any positive reason for allowing a behavior that may pester your dog.
 

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This is a great article about humping - note that 'dominance' doesn't appear once ;)

http://www.michaelbaugh.com/?p=347
Thanks for sharing! That was an interesting article.

I don't think that should matter at all. Let 'em be unhappy. Neutering won't stop humping, and he's not going to impregnate a dog at the dog park -- after all, the rules prohibit bitches in season, right? My pup is keeping his balls until he's finished growing, too.
I don't think it should matter either, guess I just care too much about what other people think =P lol.
 

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Yea I usually put an end to it. Partially because it's rude and I don't think my dogs should have to put up with rude behavior or get pushed to the point where they feel a need to correct another dog. And partially because (especially if there is a big size difference between humper and humpee) there's potential for a back injury or something. A small chance, but it's not like dogs need to hump... they can learn some self-control.
 
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