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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I live in a duplexe house with a mid-sized rooftop which is provided with a proper dog shelter. Our house is in a moderately noisy- yet predictable- suburban environment with passing cars, chat and sounds from neighboring houses all day long....BUT NOT DURING THE NIGHT .

So after i spent hours after hours carefully researching this breed's temperament , i realized that their temperament fits EXACTLY what i want in a dog.

I am planning to get it as a puppy, and looking forward to SELF TRAIN it and socialize it to the MAX to become a beloved family companion for me and my parents, as well as my personal jogging companion, guard dog and best friend:)

The only thing is that the dog will be staying during the night at the rooftop in his shelter(dog house). The rooftop is fairly large and there is plenty of room for him to run.

BUT, i am really worried that the caucasian starts barking when left on the rooftop (especially at night) because i know THEY ARE VERY ALERT GUARD DOGS BY INSTINCT...and that could cause me some nasty & mouthy arguments with neighbors....

So my question is: IS IT POSSIBLE FOR A CAUCASIAN TO GET USED TO OUR SURROUNDING ENVIRONMENT FROM PUPPYHOOD AND NOT BARK AT ANY PASSING NEIGHBOR OR HUMAN WHEN ALERTED ? because i know it's an instinct this breed has....

The male puppy i like is now 35 days old and still at the breeder's. I am planning to get it when it reaches 8 weeks old.

thanks and help is appreciated.
 

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I would say probably not. You can't train instinct out of a dog, if they are bred to be a guard dog then naturally they'll be suspicious of anyone going by. It's what they're supposed to do, so they will. Plus, on top of that, they are meant to be a livestock dog, similar to a Great Pyrenees. A Caucasian will be miserable in a city, it is meant to be in the country with room to roam. A dog like this needs a JOB, and if it doesn't bark to be protective it WILL bark because it's bored.

have you owned a dog before? The Caucasian is a very dominant breed, and since they are so large they will absolutely be a handful for an inexperienced owner. No matter what your intention, unless you're getting professional help (which I assume you wouldn't be since you said you wanted to self train), if this is only your first or second dog, and especially if you've only owned small dogs or 'easier' dogs, I'd advise you to choose one that is slightly less dominant.

Good luck!

http://www.flockguard.org/cmd/cmdowner.htm

there's a link to some stories by a few owners, hopefully that will solidify for you that right now this is not the breed for you.
 

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I agree. This is not the right breed for city dwelling. They are also very much working livestock guard dogs and very dominant. Definitely not for the inexperienced dog owner and not even for most experienced ones.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
This is not the right breed for city dwelling
Well i live in a suburban "busy" neighborhood, not in a city like u're imagining. And the country and forest are just 5 minutes away in the car.
Also, like i mentioned in my post, i am planning to take the dog on walks(in the forest), socialize it with everyone i know and obedience train it from the moment i get it.
Just thought i would mention this:)
 

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Well i live in a suburban "busy" neighborhood, not in a city like u're imagining. And the country and forest are just 5 minutes away in the car.
Also, like i mentioned in my post, i am planning to take the dog on walks(in the forest), socialize it with everyone i know and obedience train it from the moment i get it.
Just thought i would mention this:)
It's also not a very good choice for suburban dwelling.

The Caucasian Mountain Dog has a keen sense of hearing and is quick to alert to strange sounds. This means that the breed is often noisy and barks a lot, especially at night. These traits must be carefully considered by the potential owner. Because the Caucasian Mountain Dog has functioned as a livestock guardian and a predator animal, he will protect the yard from a wolf, a coyote, a mountain lion, and the neighbor's dog.

The Caucasian Mountain Dog will get along with family pets in a pack situation as long as he is "second in command". But keep in mind, this breed has a history of fighting off with wolves and is very, very large and strong. If a fight breaks out amongst family pets, the Caucasian can easily hurt another family pet. An owner must be the alpha figure in the family, in other words, the "top dog" and must lay down the law to the pack.

Be very sure that the breeder is a member of the Caucasian Ovcharka (Mountain Dog) Club of America, Inc. (C.O.C.A.) and is listed under current approved breeder list. This is your only guarantee that the dog you are getting is an authentic, purebred (see History) and that strict breed practices have been followed. Be sure to get details about the temperament/character of the parents, whether they are working farm dogs or family pets, and also the results of the hip x-rays.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
We don't have any family pets around the neighborhood, neither in the house.
And regarding the parents, well the puppy's father has a VERY aggressive temperament, and used to be stock guardian.....His mother is even tempered.
 

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I don't think this sounds like a good choice for you at all.

If you like the big fuzzy guardian idea, what about a Leonberger?

I think the barking is a major dealbreaker. CMDs are not meant to live within earshot of neighbors. I think that you could train a dog to deal with the rooftop- but asking them NOT to bark when someone walks by or a car drives by is like asking the sun not to shine. Being a guard is what they are FOR.
 

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2+ on Leonbergers over the Caucasian Mountain Dog. They're a much mellower dog that's better suited to the situation you describe.
 

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100% agree on the Leonbergers. If you read any of the stories in the link I sent you, you will understand that the CMD is really not meant to be a pet. They are a working dog, period.
 

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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
100% agree on the Leonbergers. If you read any of the stories in the link I sent you, you will understand that the CMD is really not meant to be a pet. They are a working dog, period.
Wow, just very healthy info on that link you gave !
Thank you!
I guess i have to think twice about this.
How about a HUSKY? that was actually my first choice and i have intensively researched everything about its temperament and i was willing to take the plunge. That was before i met the CO....
See, there's something that i did not mention in my thread: I AM WILLING TO DEDICATE AMLOST ALL MY TIME TO TRAIN MY FUTURE PUPPY ( husky or CO).
And also, my bro has owned more than 8 dogs over the years, ranging from rotweilers to pitbulls to german sheppards and he can really help me in training almost ANY breed i get...
So, a husky? what do u think?
 

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i think a husky will spend most if not all of its time trying to excape. :rolleyes:
 

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I think the leonberger is better looking than the CMD. I realize this is not the main thing the OP is basing their decision on, but its just my two cents.
 

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If you're new to dogs, I really think you should look into getting a less difficult dog.

If you want the fluffy wolfy look, what about a Keeshond?

Or if you're looking for a big dog, what about a St. Bernard or a Newfoundland?

Whatever you choose, I'd REALLY look into puppy obedience classes. Training a dog by yourself, no matter what the breed, can be a difficult task. You may even unknowingly reinforce bad behavior!! If you want a well mannered dog, look into professional training!

And.. did you say you were keeping your dog on the roof? Umm.. that doesn't sound like the ideal environment for any animal other then a pidgeon. Please, if you get a dog, keep it as an indoor dog, at least for most of the time. Dogs are pack animals, and need your love an affection!! Don't banish him to solitude on the top of your house.... Plus, it could get very hot during summer. All of the breeds everyone has suggested do bad in heat, and if there is no shade/water/dirt for them to lay in... you're gonna have a VERY unhappy dog.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
If you're new to dogs, I really think you should look into getting a less difficult dog.

If you want the fluffy wolfy look, what about a Keeshond?

Or if you're looking for a big dog, what about a St. Bernard or a Newfoundland?

Whatever you choose, I'd REALLY look into puppy obedience classes. Training a dog by yourself, no matter what the breed, can be a difficult task. You may even unknowingly reinforce bad behavior!! If you want a well mannered dog, look into professional training!

And.. did you say you were keeping your dog on the roof? Umm.. that doesn't sound like the ideal environment for any animal other then a pidgeon. Please, if you get a dog, keep it as an indoor dog, at least for most of the time. Dogs are pack animals, and need your love an affection!! Don't banish him to solitude on the top of your house.... Plus, it could get very hot during summer. All of the breeds everyone has suggested do bad in heat, and if there is no shade/water/dirt for them to lay in... you're gonna have a VERY unhappy dog.
Hi and tx for the message and for the concern:) :

1- Well, the reason i thought of a husky is because of the fact that they are the cleanest of all dogs(no doggy smell or very little) and they can also tolerate heat as they can tolerate cold because of their undercoat.

2- The dog will be staying only at night on the rooftop. And there is plenty of shade, not to mention its own dog house and a fairly large space to run around.

3- I'm currently living with my parents and they are both NOT dog enthouthiasts . That's why i thought of a husky(clean, no barking, occasional howls= easy to introduce to parents)

4- I am ready for training! just bring it on! i've been studying online all the tricks how to teach puppies housebreaking and obedience training.

5- I am getting a puppy, not a 10 months old dog.

6- The puppy will be brought inside the house most of the day and taken on daily jogs and walks.


That's why the husky was and, now, is back to be: my choice....
 

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Um....

You realize that huskies, while not prone to doggy odor, shed a TON, right?

I volunteered for husky rescue last in 2001. I was finding husky hair in that car until I sold it FOUR YEARS LATER.
 

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If your parents are not dog enthusiasts... please don't get a husky. Living in northern minnesota and being actively involved with many mushers has given me the opportunity to meet literally hundreds (probably thousands) of huskies, alaskan and siberian.

They are absolutely terrible pets for a first time dog owner (no matter how much you've studied) with parents who don't like dogs. Who told you they don't bark? They're 100% wrong. Huskies are one of the most vocal breeds you will ever find. Granted, most of it isn't barking persay, but it is loud and dang near constant - especially when they want something. They may not smell, but they SHED SHED SHED. They like to DIG. They are master escape artists, and once their gone... good luck. They can easily clear 30+ miles before even stopping to think "Where the heck am I?".

I REALLY like the suggestion of a Leonberger for you. Here's a couple links to some info on them, please give them a serious look, I'm convinced you will be pleasantly surprised.
http://www.leonbergerclubofamerica.com/breedinfo.aspx
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leonberger

 

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Discussion Starter #18 (Edited)
I REALLY like the suggestion of a Leonberger for you. Here's a couple links to some info on them, please give them a serious look, I'm convinced you will be pleasantly surprised.
But why underestimate my strong will, desire and focus to train my puppy to be a great obedient HAPPY husky???

I can succeed!...

Anyway, I WILL take a look at the Leonberger.

Thank you very much for your message))
 

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Your parents are not dog enthusiasts? Oh my gosh, please, please don't get a husky. Yes, they may not smell, but they need SO much stimulation and excersize, and they are NOT for a beginner, especially if you want to train them yourself!! I'm certain that a crazy terror ripping up your house is much worse then a little doggy odor!

What about a schipperke? They groom themselves like cats, and I was under the impression that THEY were the cleanest of all dogs ;)
 

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Time and dedication are probably the LEAST important traits when it comes to ability to train a husky. Creativity, a sense of humor, major persistance, and possibly an ability to work miracles would all rate higher on my list of 'Traits Needed To Train Huskies" list. They're great dogs but the more detail you go into about your situation, the more I think they're a poor choice for you.

If it's the 'wolfy' look, what about a Eurasier? They're a LOT lower-key, much easier to motivate and train for a novice dog owner, and generally overall an easier dog to own. They would NOT be able to be an outside dog- they're much more people-oriented than the husky. I really don't know that ANY dog is going to be happy as an outside dog in the situation you've described though.

 
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