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Hi, everyone! I have decided to adopt a puppy and become a first-time dog owner this summer. I've become especially interested in a six-month old puppy who might have coloboma in one eye. The folks currently looking after the pup is getting her checked out a second time due to past discrepancies they've uncovered with the former doctor they used. Apparently, they recently learned that this doctor has misdiagnosed various eye diseases with other dogs and they feel this may have happened with this particular dog.

In my understanding, if the first diagnosis was correct, a mild case might just distort or diminish vision in that eye. In the worst case scenario, she could be blind in that eye. A major part of me is happy to take her home with me regardless the outcome, but I am a little nervous since I've never owned a dog of my own before (only lived with roommates' dogs). I know that raising a puppy is a huge responsibility and commitment, which I'm prepared to undertake. But am I asking for trouble looking after a pup who might be blind in one eye?

Note: Edited to add that she seems like a normal, sweet, and playful puppy that loves people and toys and gets along with everyone so far. The people looking after her haven't noticed any odd behavior related to vision loss, but I'm not sure what telltale signs there could be or if her vision is fine now but she could lose it later in life.
 

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Dogs aren't affected by vision loss like humans are. Obviously they don't need to drive, or read, or work on a computer and their hearing and scent abilities are way better than ours.

My opinion would be that if whatever is causing her vision problems doesn't have any other related health problems, then it wouldn't concern me at all. Mild vision loss would probably be unnoticeable by you and even being completely blind in one eye won't make much difference in daily life. I've heard of people having completely blind dogs for months without noticing (esp. dogs that were used to their home and yard so they didn't have trouble getting around)

If you are not interested in certain dog sports (since it might affect her depth perception, making it harder to catch a frisbee in midair for example), then it is unlikely to restrict any normal dog activities IMO.
 

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I wouldn't worry about it personally. I would recommend googling the condition and reading up on it a little before making your decision. That way you will know if any extra care is required. But I definitely wouldnt let that stop me if I really liked that particular puppy.
 

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What kind of dog - if it is a mostly white puppy with some merle (silver and black or sand and brown patches) be aware that there may be more wrong (like deafness or hearing impaired) I don't think vision impaired in one eye would be a major problem for this dog unless you were planning to do something like agility (decreased depth perception)
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Hey, everyone thanks for the replies! I appreciate them very much since I really wasn't sure what to do.

I don't plan on doing things like agility and whatnot, and if I threw a frisbee it would just be for fun (so not a big deal at all in that regard). To my understanding, there is no treatment for coloboma so there wouldn't be ongoing expenses associated with it, nor are there any additional complications. The pup is a sable rough collie with brown ears, and neither parent had merle markings so I don't believe the dog is deaf or hearing impaired.
 

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Hey, everyone thanks for the replies! I appreciate them very much since I really wasn't sure what to do.

I don't plan on doing things like agility and whatnot, and if I threw a frisbee it would just be for fun (so not a big deal at all in that regard). To my understanding, there is no treatment for coloboma so there wouldn't be ongoing expenses associated with it, nor are there any additional complications. The pup is a sable rough collie with brown ears, and neither parent had merle markings so I don't believe the dog is deaf or hearing impaired.
Then you should be okay for a pet. Collies have lots of eye problems, some aren't progressive and would only be an issue if you were breeding. Instead of a second opinion, I'd get a CERF exam to be sure there aren't other problems. They really are not very expensive to have done.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Pawzk9 - Thanks! I know that they said she has mild CEA in her other eye, but that shouldn't affect her vision. The second opinion is kind of out of my hands. They're taking her to a veterinary ophthalmologist to get checked out. Should that be as good as getting a CERF exam? Or is that the same thing?
 

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Pawzk9 - Thanks! I know that they said she has mild CEA in her other eye, but that shouldn't affect her vision. The second opinion is kind of out of my hands. They're taking her to a veterinary ophthalmologist to get checked out. Should that be as good as getting a CERF exam? Or is that the same thing?
Probably the same thing. That's where I've always gotten CERF exams. All it is is a really thorough eye exam with specialized equipment most GP vets don't have.
 

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Go for it! Even fully blind dogs get along just fine, you'll be unlikely to notice much with a dog that's blind in one eye.

Thanks for considering adoption, especially a (somewhat) special needs dog. You're doing a good thing.
 

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I actually just found out the dog we adopted is blind in the right eye. I was kind of suspicios that he was when he ran into my leg when I turned left (he was on my left). I would recommend walking him so his good eye is next to you and he'll do fine.
 
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